Showing posts from tagged with: trucking news

FMCSA Grants Exemption to 30-Minute Rule for Truckers Hauling Fuel

Posted December 27, 2018 by Administrator

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA’s) hours of service (HOS) regulations dictate that if drivers can’t complete their duty within twelve hours under the 100 air-mile radius exemption that they have to take a 30-minute rest break. However, this rest break poses problems for carriers transporting hazardous materials. They can’t leave the cargo unsupervised, and attending the CMV doesn’t qualify as resting. The parking shortage also prevents drivers from finding a safe and secure area to park trucks toting hazardous material.

To address these challenges, FMCSA offered exemptions to the rule for carriers transporting specified fuels. However, propane didn’t make the initial list. This put drivers transporting petroleum-based cargo in a difficult situation. While most of them load their vehicles in the morning with the intent to finish several deliveries by the end of the day, outside circumstances can prevent this from happening.

These drivers operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) on interstate highways so traffic and accidents can impede their deliveries. Since they can’t leave their hazardous cargo to rest but they also can’t push beyond the 12-hour regulation, the National Propane Gas Association (NPGA) petitioned FMCSA for an amendment. The transportation agency granted the request, which will remain in effect through April 10, 2023.

Complying with FMCSA regulations is critical to remain in operation as a trucking company, but these rulings can create challenges for fleets. In this instance, the need to transport hazardous cargo safely took precedence and FMCSA issued an amendment. Cline Wood understands the risks involved with transporting hazardous materials. We can help your trucking company assess its risks and implement solutions to address them: get in touch at safetrucking@clinewood.com.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

3 Technologies That Will Define the Future of Trucking

Posted October 16, 2018 by Administrator

For the past several years, the IAA Commercial Vehicles shows have circled around the themes of electrify, automate, and connect. Now, the trucking community is getting a glimpse into what those elements will mean for the industry’s future.

Electric Trucks

In previous years, the shows placed a premium on connectivity over electrification, but they’ve since swapped their focus. This is unsurprising given the rise of Nikola and Tesla electric vehicles as well as the positive public perception for electric transportation. As urbanization continues to spread across the country, the transportation industry has to address problems such as congestion, air quality, and more. Trucks made for an easy target; going electric means no emissions, less noise, and an easier path to creating autonomous processes to reduce traffic problems.

Automation Before Autonomous

The IAA made it a point to stress the preference for automation over fully autonomous vehicles. This is in large part because there is no reliable timetable for when autonomous vehicles will be ready for deliveries in every situation trucking can present (i.e. weather, terrain, human drivers, etc.). However, automating functions for safety and productivity are well underway. Some existing examples of automation already in use include automated emergency braking and systems that adjust trucks to keep them in their lanes.

Understanding Connectivity

Connectivity used to be at the forefront of the IAA, but its descent to the bottom of the list is unsurprising. Connectivity is already flourishing in the trucking industry after years of advancements. In fact, the progression of connectivity is what paved the way for innovations in electrification and automation. Telematics represented one of the biggest breakthroughs in connectivity and now drivers can interface with their vehicles and the vehicles around them for predictive maintenance, platooning, etc.

The presentations and displays at the past few IAA shows paint a clear picture of the future of trucking. Trucking companies need to embrace the message of electrify, automate, and connect if they want to remain relevant. To stay up to date with the latest trucking innovations and how they will affect your trucking business, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

The Importance of a Driver Employee Referral Program for Trucking Companies

Posted August 13, 2018 by Administrator

In light of the current truck driver shortage, many trucking companies are raising pay as well as using a mix of recruitment strategies to attract new driver candidates. One of the most effective recruitment policy is an employee referral program.

The retention rate of employees that are referred by an existing employee will stay with your company an average of 2.7 years, compared to 1.5 years for candidates that were recruited from job boards. Employee referrals result in the most qualified applicants at a 1 to 10 ratio; applicants recruited through another avenues average 1 to 18.

Some of the most successful trucking companies have employee referral programs. There are several advantages to hiring an applicant that has been referred by a current employee.

  • In general, the time required to interview and check references for a new hire that has been referred by an employee is less – 20 days on average for a referral as opposed to 39 days for someone hired via a job board
  • New hires know at least one person in the company, giving them someone to turn to for guidance and support
  • When an employee refers someone to the company, it helps to retain both the existing employee and the new one

If your company is not using this valuable recruitment strategy, it is a good idea to consider instituting an employee referral program. Here are 5 things to keep in mind as you design a new program or fine tune an existing one.

  1. Who can participate?

Who will be eligible to participate in your employee referral program? Is it limited to drivers, or will you include managers, interns, temps or other staff members?

  1. How will the program work?
  • Will you give a different amount to different types of applicants (i.e. experienced drivers, recent grads, less experienced drivers, students, etc.)?
  • Will you offer a one-time bonus or offer incentives for various milestones, such as the new hire completing their first load or remaining active for 90 days, etc?
  • Will you offer to earn mileage pay for each mile your referred driver covers?
  • Make sure you specify reward amounts and payout timeframe and structure.
  1. How will you track the program?

Set up an applicant tracking system that includes a referral source field (type of referral = employee) and the name of the referrer. Collect any other pertinent information, such as the date of the referral. You can use a simple tracking form such as Google Docs or an Excel spreadsheet to track the information.

  1. How will you market the program?

Consider using the following marketing tactics to get the word out about your employee referral program:

  • Launch party to build excitement
  • Pre and post launch communications in company email, newsletter or other communications systems you are currently using
  • Consider using a SMS texting service to continue to reach out to your existing driver-base
  • Make sure your hiring managers and recruiters understand the program completely and the value it brings the company
  • Don’t forget to let new hires know about the program as they can be a valuable source of new applicants.
  • Hold fun driver referral contests that give drivers an exciting reason to recommend new applicants. The rewards/prizes should be interesting and relevant to drivers. Keep the contest fun and engaging and recognize participants throughout the entire campaign.
  1. Are you using employee referral program best practices?
  • Keep the rules of the program simple and easy to understand. If it’s too complicated, people will be discouraged from wanting to participate.
  • Use an interactive system that makes it easy and personalized for employees, such as setting up a cloud-based referral system.
  • Make sure you follow through on the rewards of the program as promised.
  • Don’t be stingy with rewards – your employees are helping your company and should be rewarded accordingly.
  • Contact the referrers and thank them personally. People really appreciate the recognition and are more likely to refer in the future.

Employee referrals are a powerful source of finding potential drivers. When they have an incentive to make the effort to make a recommendation, your company will benefit with more leads, new hires and better retention rates.

Cline Wood Insurance offers customized insurance, risk products and services that will improve your bottom line. You can depend on Cline Wood to offer solutions tailored to your needs. To learn more about how Cline Wood can help your trucking company, click here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Curb Digital Addiction in Your Fleet

Posted July 16, 2018 by Administrator

Driver safety is paramount to a fleet’s success. However, no amount of safety devices can contend with a distracted driver. Over one-third of millennials check their phones at least once per hour compared to 21% of the rest of the population. In fact, most people check their phones upward of 100 times per day.

The Problem with Digital Dependency

Being tied to technology creates a multitude of problems for drivers; however, the greatest is its effect on sleep. One survey found that over half of respondents slept with their phone next to their bed, 13% slept with their phone in their bed, and 3% slept with their phone in their hand. This creates a sense of urgency for every after-hour text, phone call, or email.

New messages disturb sleep and make employees feel like they need to respond right away. Driver fatigue is one of the known leading causes of accidents and fatalities in the transportation industry so it behooves fleets to get serious about how attached drivers are to their phones.

Finding Solutions to Improve Safety

The simplest solution to the reliance on cell phones is to stop multitasking. The vast majority of people who attempt to multitask fail to be effective. For example, drivers know they shouldn’t text and drive or talk on the phone and drive. However, a ping of a new message or phone call is often a tempting lure. Drivers can download apps that prevent non-urgent texts and emails from coming through, but the problem is not just with drivers.

Fleet managers often send the wrong signal when it comes to cell phone usage. For example, if a manager checks his or her phone several times during a conversation with a driver, that individual will likely feel like the manager isn’t paying attention. This can create a negative cycle where employees don’t bring forward problems or concerns due to a perceived lack of interest from management.

Managers should also pay attention to when they send emails. It may be a manager’s preference to send emails after hours, but this practice can make employees feel pressured to respond even though they aren’t on the clock. If this is the case, managers should set clear expectations that they don’t expect employees to read or respond to emails sent after hours until the following workday.

Technology isn’t going to go away or slow down anytime soon. However, how fleets and drivers manage their use of it has a big effect on overall safety. If your fleet is struggling with transportation safety, contact the experts at Cline Wood to learn how we can help.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Will Driver Pay Incentives Bring Needed Changes to the Trucking Industry?

Posted July 9, 2018 by Administrator

Some motor carrier fleets claim they have implemented dramatic changes to their compensation packages. But adding monetary incentives is not a unique idea. Granted, pay increases attract new, younger drivers and help to retain seasoned workers at a time when the need for drivers is skyrocketing throughout the trucking industry.

Many fleet professionals believe that a higher rate of pay is critical in order to solve the driver crisis. Furthermore, performance bonuses help to ensure quality of service and provide drivers with a reward for exemplary service.

A stronger economy, coupled with regulatory changes, is helping to drive the increased demand for higher wages. Drivers are leaving the profession at a rate faster than they can be replaced. Baby boomers are reaching retirement age and younger people in the workforce tend to have far more career options than the baby-boomer generation had.

The flow of drivers out of the industry and lack of enough drivers entering the profession has created a situation where drivers are in a position to demand better pay and better working conditions. Drivers want more than a pay-per-mile increase; they want total compensation and benefit packages that include sign-on bonuses.

These days, bonuses for the following are becoming increasingly popular as recruitment tools:

  • Safety
  • Miles driven
  • Tenure
  • Minimum weekly rates
  • Layover and vacation pay.

Drivers must deal with a great deal of stress while on the road, often due to increased regulations, shipper and receiver delays as well as tighter schedule demands.

However, while fleet owners understand the pressure placed on drivers, and appreciate that drivers deserve higher rates of pay, other factors, such as stagnant freight rates, has forced the industry as a whole to keep driver compensation static.

Rising freight rates are helping fleets make up the difference between escalating wage increases and budgetary constraints. As demand for motor carrier drivers continues to expand, some companies have become so frustrated they are reducing their workforce and lowering their productivity levels.

Drivers cite a myriad of issues that are placing barriers to recruiting new workers, including:

  • Paying drivers on a per mile or per-hour basis instead of salary
  • Failing lines of communication with fleet management and owners
  • Lack of sleep
  • Time away from home
  • Unpredictable miles
  • Ineffective administration
  • Spending time looking for trailers
  • Being detained for long load and unload periods of time
  • Poorly-set appointments
  • Lack of respect for their work.

Individual fleets need to look at their own workforce and find out why their drivers are not being retained. Generally, the highest turnover rate is in the first few months following a hire. Fleets suffer because the onboarding process is expensive. In order to help reduce a high rate of turnover in the first few months, make sure you target and attract the right potential employees. Increasing wages may help to attract new drivers, but they won’t stay if they can’t handle the lifestyle and frustrations of the job.

Fleets need to think about what it takes to attract millennials. Many will demand longer vacation times as well as earning a fair living wage despite clocking in fewer hours. There is still much work to be done to improve the market for attracting and retaining qualified, high-performing younger drivers.

Cline Wood is more than just an insurance agency. We tailor insurance and risk products and services that improve your bottom line. As a Cline Wood client, we care about your business; you can depend on the knowledge and experience of Cline Wood to help analyze and solve your needs. To learn more about how Cline Wood can help your trucking business, click here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Medical Certification Submission Requirements Postponed Due to Cyber Attack on FMCSA Registry

Posted May 4, 2018 by Administrator

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has announced changes to the CDL Medical Certification reporting submission requirements, due in part to technical issues on the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners registry website.

The FMCSA Medical Program requirements are designed to ensure commercial motor carriers are physically qualified to engage in interstate commerce. Drivers are required to obtain a medical exam from a certified medical examiner that is listed in the National Registry. In a new rule that is expected to roll out June 2, 2018, medical examiners are required to submit driver exam results by midnight the following day. However, due to the technical glitch in the current system, examiners are being told to hold on to the exam results from completed physical and then upload them when the system is back online.

The agency is postponing requirements that medical information on drivers and their exam results be submitted to state agencies for three additional years. The postponement is due in part to the technical issues that resulted from unauthorized access to the system, triggering the National Registry website outage. An incident in early December 2017 caused the National Registry to be taken offline, leading to interruptions in the development of the electronic transmission process.

Delaying compliance on the submission of the records until June 22, 2021 will give the agency adequate time to make the necessary programming changes.

Drivers are still required to self-report their certification status to their state agencies, a requirement that has been in effect since January 30, 2012. Certified medical examiners are encouraged to continue to conduct DOT physicals and issue medical examination certifications. Examiners are required to pass certain tests and become listed in the registry.

FMCSA has confirmed that no personal information was exposed in the December 2017 cyber attack. The registry has been down since December and continues to remain down. A simple search by zip code is accessible, but access to the full portal is still not functioning. The attempt to access data by the cyber criminals was not successful, and no information was compromised. Roadside inspectors are continuing to check drivers’ medical certificates, but there is a backlog of exam results being uploaded into the system due to the site still being offline.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Propel Your Trucking Fleet Into the Future with IoT Technology

Posted April 10, 2018 by Administrator

The trucking industry drives the economy, literally.

Trucking fleets carry more than 70 percent of the freight that is transported throughout the U.S. Since so much cargo is being transported by tractor trailers, it is critical that trucking companies manage their fleets with as much efficiency as possible by keeping their expenses low and productivity high. Today, many trucking fleets are achieving this through the power of the Internet of Things (IoT).

Businesses in a wide range of industries are eagerly adopting IoT technology, and the trucking industry is no exception. Experts predict that 80 billion IoT devices will be online by 2025. All of these devices will be generating a great quantity of data – perhaps as much as 180 zettabytes. Companies are leveraging this wealth of data to improve customer service, increase productivity, reduce operating costs and automate processes.

In addition to these advantages, trucking companies that want to upgrade their fleets with IoT can further leverage the technology to increase safety and provide greater product and asset visibility.

Here are some innovative ways trucking fleets are using the IoT.

  1. IoT sensors

Sensors that are attached to rigs are able to collect valuable data about the vehicle. This data can then be used to gain useful insights to track, monitor, analyze and maintain all assets in real-time, wherever they are in the network.

  1. Sensor data and condition monitoring

Sensors collect and transmit key data to a central location, enabling fleets to monitor the condition of their trucks. For example, if the tire pressure on a vehicle gets low, an alert can be sent to the driver or maintenance shop so the tire can be properly inflated before there is a blow-out on the freeway.

  1. Data analysis

IoT and sensor data is useful for more than identifying maintenance issues. Data can be used to track patterns and needed areas for improvement. For example, if a certain brand or type of battery is dying too quickly, a report can detect the issue quicker than in the past.

  1. New business processes

IoT can help your company optimize your day-to-day operations. The types of logistics optimizations that could be impacted include:

  • Enhancing delivery strategies
  • Cutting travel costs
  • Reducing emissions
  • Routing optimization
  • Reduce tolls and fees
  • Fuel conservation.

How Will New Tax Reform Laws Impact Fleet Truck Drivers?

Posted March 19, 2018 by Administrator

The new tax laws that were passed in December 2017 include good news and bad news for trucking drivers, but mostly good news for independent owner-operators. While nothing changes for the tax year 2017, starting in 2018 company drivers will no longer be able to itemize their expenses. This law will dramatically change the number of itemizations a driver is entitled to deduct, especially per diem expenses, which traditionally has reduced drivers’ taxable income and put more refund money into their pocket.

In the past, drivers were able to deduct per diem and other expenses, such as:

  • Mobile phone and service
  • Work boots
  • Gloves
  • Bed linens for the sleeper
  • Other necessities required for on-the-road travel that was not provided by their company.

These itemizations disappear under the new tax law. However, don’t panic! The standard deduction that everyone is entitled to has almost doubled to $12,000, which should help offset the impact of the loss of the expense deductions, but it doesn’t offset all of it.
Luckily enough, there is a workaround.

Fleets will still be able to deduct the per diem that the company pays drivers as part of their wage. If a driver is paid per diem, a percentage of the cost will be per diem wage that is not taxed. Under the old laws, per diem paid to the driver by the company was almost always added back in because it needed to be reported to the IRS as income. Since this could be itemized by the driver, it made sense to claim this as income. But under the new law, per diem reimbursement pay can be written off by the company as part of their corporate expense. Everybody wins if the company chooses to operate this way.

Independent owner-operators and small fleet owners will still be able to itemize per diem deductions. They will also receive a 20 percent tax break, which will save them even more money. As long as trucking companies raise the amount of reimbursement per diem paid to drivers as wages, everyone will come out ahead under the new tax reform laws.

Regardless of the type of trucking company you operate, it is imperative that you seek out the services of a reputable tax preparer that is knowledgeable about the trucking industry. And, by the same token, it is vital that you seek out a reputable insurance carrier that understands the trucking industry. Click here to learn more about how the experts at Cline Wood can help you manage your risk.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Are Driving Simulators Beneficial for Truck Driving Training?

Posted February 19, 2018 by Administrator

Driving simulators are increasingly being used to train novice truck drivers. Evolving from flight simulators for aviation training, driving simulators represent the newest, emerging training tool for new drivers. Driving simulators are designed to closely simulate actual driving conditions of real vehicles and, as such, they are useful for skills mastery and performance evaluation.

Recent research indicates that skills learned in the truck simulator are easily transferable to a real truck and are learned as quickly – and sometimes faster – than learning in a real truck. The research study, “Transfer of Training in Basic Controls from a Truck Simulator to a Real Truck,” was recognized by the Transportation Research Board as the “Best 2017 Paper.”

The award-winning research focused on the following training segments:

  • Shifting non-synchronized gears
  • Straight-line maneuvers
  • Angle backing maneuvers.

The researchers found that the students that used the simulator were as proficient in straight-line backing and in 45-degree backing as students that were not trained in a simulator environment. All students that were being trained took about the same amount of time to complete the maneuvers.

Interestingly, students that learned gear-shifting skills in the simulation environment learned how to complete their assigned tasks faster than the control group. However, both groups were operating at the same proficiency level within a few days.

In general, most driving simulators have the following features:

  • 180-degree view of the field
  • Graphics software that provides a road view and change weather and traffic patterns
  • Force-loaded steering wheel that gives a feel of different terrain
  • Built-in events like a tire blow-out
  • A mix of truck and tractor configurations
  • A seat, steering wheel, 3 pedals and a gear shift
  • Technology that allows for recording student performance and playback.

Most truck driving training programs that use driving simulators are fans of the technology. However, most programs use experienced truck drivers to teach real-world knowledge and skills. Benefits of a truck driving training simulator include:

  • No real safety concerns
  • No wear and tear on the real truck
  • No fuel use during training activities.

The general consensus is that driving simulation devices are a valuable addition to – but not a replacement for – hands-on training by experienced, in-cab instructors.

Cline Wood recognizes that safety is a significant component of any business. A proper safety program is essential and can have a significant impact on the overall profitability of any commercial business. Clients of Cline Wood are given full access to a broad spectrum of safety services. We are a committed partner in managing your every day risk. To learn more about what we can do for your business, click here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Agriculture and Livestock Haulers Receive 90-Day ELD Exemption from FMCSA

Posted December 18, 2017 by Administrator

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has issued a temporary waiver of the electronics logging device (ELD) mandate for agricultural commodities and livestock carriers.

The 90-day waiver will be in effect through March 18, 2018. The FMCSA made it clear that drivers who are operating under the waiver must comply with the following conditions:

  1. Drivers must carry a copy of the waiver notice with them on board and make it available for review during inspections.
  2. Drivers who wish to utilize the waiver must have a “satisfactory” rating from FMCSA or be unrated. Motor carriers with a conditional or unsatisfactory rating are not allowed to take advantage of the waiver.
  3. Drivers using the waiver must notify FMCSA within 5 working business days if they are involved in an accident and must provide details of the incident to the agency.

FMCSA announced that the waiver was being granted to give them time to gather additional public commentary on the mandate so that they can better address the concerns of agricultural and livestock haulers related to operating under the ELD regulation.

The agency specified that it wants to investigate “certain exemption applications” related to the agricultural industry concerning the use of ELDs to document hours of service for drivers. The agency also wants to clarify the “applicability of requirements” for agricultural carriers as it relates to the original deadline.

FMCSA officials have indicated they will be providing related to the existing 150 air miles hours-of-service exemption. The guidance is expected to assist carriers in understanding how to maximize the use of the statutory exemption. The agency has indicated a desire to implement the ELD mandate using a process that improves safety without impeding commerce.

The agency has indicated they will be publishing an official notice of the waiver announcement in the Federal Register in the next few days. For more on transportation and agribusiness updates and coverages, contact Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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