The Holidays are approaching fast – beware of CARGO THEFT!

Posted October 31, 2018 by Erin

While you’re making preparations for company gatherings and thinking about holiday shopping, be sure to take some time to review the processes and checks your company has in place to prevent cargo theft – because thieves are already making their plans to take their presents early.  In fact, according to a Dec., 2016 Commercial Carrier Journal article, approximately $5.8 million in cargo losses were incurred during the holiday season between 2012 and 2016.1

If you’re ever been the victim of cargo theft, you’re likely very familiar with what that terminology means.  However, the Criminal Justice Information Services Advisory Policy Board developed the following legal definition: “The criminal taking of any cargo including, but not limited to, goods, chattels, money, or baggage that constitutes, in whole or in part, a commercial shipment of freight moving in commerce, from any pipeline system, railroad car, motor truck, or other vehicle, or from any tank or storage facility, station house, platform, or depot, or from any vessel or wharf, or from any aircraft, air terminal, airport, aircraft terminal or air navigation facility, or from any intermodal container, intermodal chassis, trailer, container freight station, warehouse, freight distribution facility, or freight consolidation facility….”2

Much of this cargo theft occurs at truck stops, parking lots, and warehouses – or in other words where most commercial vehicles can be found.  There are a couple common theft scenarios.  First scenario involves a thief following a driver from the warehouse until he stops, then stealing the cargo at that location.  Second scenario involves what’s generally called “fictitious pickups”, or pickups where a thief impersonates a legitimate carrier and fraudulently secures a contract to transport cargo.  The cargo is taken in this scenario with typically no trace of the thief upon discovery of the crime.3

So what can your company do to help prevent this kind of theft?  In his Dec. 2017 webinar (which can be viewed on our Recorded Webinars page HERE), NICB Special Agent Steve Covey suggests: vetting potential business associates by way of internet checks (Safersys.org, FMCSA) and word of mouth/calling other companies; contacting local Cargo Security Councils and national associations to access the latest information and resources; and, make friends with the police before your problem happens (the police want to help you prevent theft and are happy to give their input).  Other measures that can help include high visibility lighting, secured yards, high security locks, and confirming receiving facilities holiday hours to help prevent unnecessary layovers with loaded trucks.1

For more information or assistance, please contact us at safetrucking@clinewood.com.  We appreciate your safety efforts!

1source: https://www.ccjdigital.com/cargonet-freightwatch-warn-against-holiday-season-cargo-theft/

2source: “Cargo Theft, 2016”, pg. 1, 2016 Crime in the United States, U.S. Department of Justice – Federal Bureau of Investigation – Criminal Justice Information Services Division

3source: “2014 NICB Identified Cargo Thefts: NC, SC, VA”, pg. 1-2, Data Analytics Forecast Report

 

 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

5 Crops That Perform Well in the Fall

Posted October 23, 2018 by Administrator

As temperatures start to drop lower, many farmers stop their planting efforts. This is unsurprising since many crops don’t fare well in cold weather. Freezing temperatures, frost, and snow cripple most crops, but not all of them. Root vegetables perform well despite the change in season; farmers can also take this time to jump-start their spring planting efforts. While fall planting isn’t for every farmer, the following crops offer farmers a prolonged planting season:

  1. It’s easy for farmers to obtain onion bulblets in the fall. Before temperatures drop to below freezing, farmers can reap fresh scallions. Once winter hits full force, the onions will remain dormant until temperatures increase. The crops will pop up in the spring, giving farmers a head start on the season.
  2. As a member of the same plant family as the onion, leeks perform well in the fall and winter. They perform best when planted in the early fall.
  3. Strawberries. Most farmers that cultivate strawberries purchase them for spring planting. However, farmers can increase their productivity by getting started in the fall. Most farmers pinch off the blossoms during the initial season to allow the plant to better develop its roots. By doing this in the fall, farmers can harvest the fruit at the start of the main season.
  4. Radishes. These plants grow much faster than most. Within four weeks of planting, farmers can begin harvesting. Because they thrive in cooler temperatures, farmers can plant and harvest them multiple times during the fall and winter. It also helps that cold weather enhances their flavor.
  5. Greens. Lettuce, kale, and spinach are great fall crops as cooler temperatures make the leaves taste sweeter. Like onions, farmers don’t need to fear planting them too late to harvest. They’ll sprout back up once temperatures begin to rise after winter.

Even though the above crops are excellent for fall planting, farmers do need to take steps to protect them from extreme winter temperatures. This means sprinkling a loose layer of straw over them to protect them from frost heaving. To learn more about how to protect fall crops, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

3 Technologies That Will Define the Future of Trucking

Posted October 16, 2018 by Administrator

For the past several years, the IAA Commercial Vehicles shows have circled around the themes of electrify, automate, and connect. Now, the trucking community is getting a glimpse into what those elements will mean for the industry’s future.

Electric Trucks

In previous years, the shows placed a premium on connectivity over electrification, but they’ve since swapped their focus. This is unsurprising given the rise of Nikola and Tesla electric vehicles as well as the positive public perception for electric transportation. As urbanization continues to spread across the country, the transportation industry has to address problems such as congestion, air quality, and more. Trucks made for an easy target; going electric means no emissions, less noise, and an easier path to creating autonomous processes to reduce traffic problems.

Automation Before Autonomous

The IAA made it a point to stress the preference for automation over fully autonomous vehicles. This is in large part because there is no reliable timetable for when autonomous vehicles will be ready for deliveries in every situation trucking can present (i.e. weather, terrain, human drivers, etc.). However, automating functions for safety and productivity are well underway. Some existing examples of automation already in use include automated emergency braking and systems that adjust trucks to keep them in their lanes.

Understanding Connectivity

Connectivity used to be at the forefront of the IAA, but its descent to the bottom of the list is unsurprising. Connectivity is already flourishing in the trucking industry after years of advancements. In fact, the progression of connectivity is what paved the way for innovations in electrification and automation. Telematics represented one of the biggest breakthroughs in connectivity and now drivers can interface with their vehicles and the vehicles around them for predictive maintenance, platooning, etc.

The presentations and displays at the past few IAA shows paint a clear picture of the future of trucking. Trucking companies need to embrace the message of electrify, automate, and connect if they want to remain relevant. To stay up to date with the latest trucking innovations and how they will affect your trucking business, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Assessing Risk in the Farming Industry

Posted October 9, 2018 by Administrator

Running a successful farm takes hard work and careful risk management. Farms face several unique risks that don’t affect other industries. However, assessing those risks follows the same process. While the degree of acceptable risk and the approach to handle it will differ from person to person, the framework for identifying risks remains unchanged.

Develop a Risk Heat Chart

A heat chart provides a simple visual tool to identify if a risk is significant enough and likely enough to address. The chart below is a simple illustration comparing the potential effect of a risk on the left and the likelihood of the risk occurring on the bottom. The darker the color, the more damage the risk can cause to the business.

To make a usable risk heat chart, farmers need to perform the following:

  1. Pinpoint things that can go wrong. This includes external and internal risks. This step is critical because many farmers overlook risks they think are unlikely, which can come back to haunt them later. Some external risks include fluctuating markets, law and regulations governing farming, and weather events. Internal risks can be a loss of employees due to failing health or quitting, damage to assets such as a barn fire, personal debt, and more.
  2. Estimate the potential effect. Once farmers identify risks that can affect their farm, they need to determine how much it can hurt their operation. Farmers will want to seek input from employees to gain a balanced view of the risks. Using the above heat chart, farmers can assign five categories ranging from negligible to severe for the potential effect the risk can exert on the farm.
  3. Estimate how likely the risk is. Similar to the above step, farmers need to look at their risks and determine how likely they are to happen. From there, they can assign them to one of five categories ranging from remote to probable.

Once farmers know their risks and decide how much they can affect the business and how likely they are to occur, they can plug them into the various slots on the heat chart. For example, if a farmer estimates that a drought it possible this year (category 3 risk) and the potential effect is severe (category 5), this creates a risk score of 15—one of the hottest risks on the heat chart. This tells the farmer he or she needs to develop a risk management strategy to protect their farming operation. All farms have risks they need to address, but they don’t need to do it alone. The experts at Cline Wood can help you identify all risks that could affect your farm as well as implement strategies to mitigate them. Contact us to learn more.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Keeping Truck Brakes Safe Year Round

Posted October 2, 2018 by Administrator

Following the recent Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) Brake Safety Week, brake maintenance remains a priority. With colder weather rapidly approaching, truck drivers and fleet managers need to ensure truck brakes are operational before hitting the roads in less than optimal conditions.

Brake Safety for Drivers

Truck drivers can take several steps to improve their brake safety. Some suggestions include:

  • Inspect the vehicle to identify safety risks to the driver and other motor vehicles on the road. Pre-trip inspections should last 10-15 minutes and include the truck, trailer, cab, and all equipment.
  • Go over the CSVA’s Brake Inspection Checklist. Drivers should check for damaged or missing components, worn or cracked brake pads, etc.
  • Check tire pressure regularly. When truck drivers use their brakes, it accelerates wear and tear on tire tread. By making sure tires aren’t over or underinflated, drivers can prolong the life of their brakes.
  • Practice defensive driving. Hard braking tears brakes. Sometimes, it may seem impossible to avoid hard braking when other motorists suddenly hit their brakes. However, if truck drivers maintain a good following distance, they can circumvent the situation. Other ways to avoid hard braking are to follow the speed limit, obey traffic signs, and slow down in work zones.

Brake Safety for Fleet Managers

Managing driver safety is a top priority for fleet managers, but this can be hard to do without being in the trucks with the employees. The following are several ways fleet managers can monitor and control brake safety:

  • Utilize telematics data. This information can inform fleet managers if drivers are braking hard, speeding, or other behaviors that affect brakes.
  • Create a culture of safety. Emphasize the importance of pre- and post-trip inspections to identify potential issues with brakes before they become a major problem.
  • Implement preventative maintenance. Consistent maintenance can prolong the life of brakes as well as increase driver safety.

Brake safety is an issue that concerns drivers and fleet managers alike. By making it a company-wide issue, fleets can extend the lifespan on their brakes as well as reduce the risk of a brake-related accident. To learn other ways to reduce risk in your fleet, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Estimate Corn Yield Using 2 Methods

Posted September 25, 2018 by Administrator

Farmers rely on corn yield estimates to make crop management and grain marketing decisions. However, basic methods of calculating crop yield can produce misleading results. The more simple the calculation, the greater the margin of error is. All methods of estimating corn yield require farmers to count the kernels on an ear of corn.

The simplest of methods relies on estimating how many ears per acre a farm produces. While it may be easier to estimate ears per acre and multiply that by the number of kernels per an average size ear of corn, the results will not be accurate. The following outlines two methods for estimating corn yield starting with the least accurate method.

  1. Simple but inaccurate. As mentioned above, the simplest method is the least accurate. To achieve a rough estimate of corn yield, farmers who anticipate around 26,000 ears per acre can select an average size ear of corn, count its kernels, and multiply it by 0.289 (this multiplier implies an average size kernel). Farmers should skip kernels near the top that are less than half the size of regular kernels. To do this, farmers can count the kernels in one row on the ear of corn and multiply it by the number of total rows. For example, 12 rows with 48 kernels is 576 kernels per ear (12*48 = 576). Multiplying this by 0.289 equates to approximately 166.5 bushels per acre (166.464 to be exact). This math makes several assumptions about the ears per acre as well as the average kernel size. It also excludes outliers such as pests, drought, and other stressors that can affect kernel size or overall yield.
  2. Recalculating for population and seed size. The above example assumes a crop production of around 26,000 ears per acre. However, farmers should reduce this number by 1000-2000 to account for pests and other issues that can affect the final yield number. They should also incorporate a multiplier for kernel size ranging from small to large to take weather conditions into consideration. Poor weather will yield smaller kernels and vice versa. For this particular example, farmers should use the following equations to get a better idea of what to expect:
    1. 25,000 ears per acre in a stressful year: 576*0.227=~131 bushels per acre
    2. 25,000 ears per acre in an average year: 576*0.278=~160 bushels per acre
    3. 25,000 ears per acre in a very productive year: 576*0.357=~205.5 bushels per acre

This results in a possible range of 131-205.5 bushels per acre. While the simple method’s number fell in this range, the final result could be much less or much more depending on outside factors.

If the farmer wishes to be even more conservative, he or she can reduce their expected yield by 2000 and use the following equations:

  1. 24,000 ears per acre in a stressful year: 576*0.218=~125.5 bushels per acre
  2. 24,000 ears per acre in an average year: 576*0.267=~154 bushels per acre
  3. 24,000 ears per acre in a very productive year: 576*0.342=~197 bushels per acre

This equation produces a range of 125.5-197 bushels per acre. Both of these equations result in more than 70 bushels per acre in difference and can have significant implications for a farmer’s bottom line and budget. Farmers need to prepare for all possibilities for their corn yield so as not to endanger their farming operation. To learn more ways to protect your livelihood and your farm, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Cline Wood expands Risk Management Team with addition of two experienced safety professionals

Posted September 21, 2018 by Erin

CLINE WOOD EXPANDS RISK MANAGEMENT TEAM WITH ADDITION OF TWO EXPERIENCED SAFETY PROFESSIONALS

Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC company, has hired two new risk consultants to help its transportation and agribusiness clients build and enhance their safety cultures and design and implement various industry-specific risk management solutions.

Steve Page has spent over 30 years as a leader in transportation and safety management. His previous leadership positions within several realms of the trucking industry included roles focusing on safety and safety programs, compliance, FMCSR rules and regulations, and driver management/coaching. He earned the NATMI Certified Director of Safety designation in 2003 and many other awards and acknowledgments because of his work in transportation safety. Steve will primarily work with employers in the Midwest region.

Kenny Ray has spent over 30 years building a successful career in safety, security and risk management. His experience includes 25 years as a peace officer in Texas and many years with the Texas Department of Public Safety and Texas Rangers in various leadership positions. These combined with his most recent role as a transportation safety director have positioned him well to support Cline Wood clients in Texas and the Southwest.

“We are committed to helping our clients build a safety culture that helps control losses and increase the value of their companies,” said Mike Wood, president of Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC company. “Our team is made up of proven professionals who have met the challenges in the industries we represent and they will work with our clients to find solutions to those challenges. We are extremely pleased to have both Steve and Kenny join us, as they embark on a new stage of their careers.”

 

Please contact our Safety & Risk Management team with any questions at safetrucking@clinewood.com.

 

How Will Technology Affect the Future of Freight?

Posted September 18, 2018 by Administrator

For the last half-century, truck drivers and carriers booked their oversize loads through traditional methods such as by phone, fax, or email. However, recent data suggests this is poised to change. While three-quarters of individuals have had positive experiences with traditional brokers, almost as many (73%) would like it if they never had to use one again. What this indicates is the system works, but it doesn’t work as well as drivers and carriers would prefer. Seeing an opening for opportunity, innovators jumped onto the scene.

Understanding the Proliferation of the Online Freight Marketplace

When people began booking their freight online, 77% indicated the experience was superior to traditional brokers. This is unsurprising as booking their trips online netted 61% of them more money. Of those who have not yet tried booking freight online, 81% indicated they would like to try it. When asked why they dislike traditional brokers, carriers gave the following responses:

  • 53% of drivers indicated traditional brokers were missing information or provided wrong information about the freight
  • 50% of drivers reported poor communication with traditional brokers
  • 40% of drivers received their payments late from traditional brokers
  • 29% never received payment at all from traditional brokers
  • 28% received unfair compensation from traditional brokers for their work

When asked what features they liked and required of the online marketplace, carriers indicated the following:

  • 28% of carriers indicated fast pay and no factoring fees was most important
  • 25% specified better information about freight
  • 20% prefer the online marketplace’s pricing transparency

Another benefit of the online marketplace is carriers don’t have to spend as much time locating their next load. They also often receive a higher rate of pay per mile. One of the biggest examples of the online freight marketplace is Uber Freight. Launched over a year ago, Uber Freight helps match carriers to shippers much like the traditional ride service matches riders with drivers. Uber Freight allows drivers and carriers to apply filters for location, drive distance, and more to identify loads that meet their needs.

With the shifting trucking landscape, it can be difficult for trucking companies to keep up with new technology. If your trucking business is struggling to adapt to new industry changes, Cline Wood can help. Contact us to learn more about running your business as effectively as possible.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Farmers Share the Top 3 Challenges Facing Agribusiness

Posted September 11, 2018 by Administrator

Small and medium size agribusinesses now experience significant challenges from the local level all the way up to the global stage. They must stretch to meet the growing demand to feed the global population while adhering to unforgiving emissions regulations. This means trying to grow more food on less land to reduce their ecological footprint. To understand these challenges better, CASE IH conducted a survey at the Ag Connect Expo to find out farmers’ biggest concerns. By learning about farmers’ diverse needs, the agriculture industry is better able to innovate and develop technological solutions. Some of the biggest challenges farmers face include:

  1. Meeting the worldwide need for food. As economies boom and populations proliferate, it is becoming harder for farmers to keep up with production demands.
  2. Managing the dearth of land. With less land available, prices are skyrocketing. Farmers need more land to keep up with global demands for food, but purchasing the property is cost prohibitive.
  3. Mandates and regulations. The government issues new regulations in an effort to improve safety and reduce the effect of farming on the environment. However, this means farmers must be ready to pivot and change business operations without disrupting production or increasing costs.

Other concerns farmers identified included the stability of global markets as well as the advancement and use of bio-based fuels. When asked which of the above concerns will affect their farming operation in the immediate future, government regulations was the top response. Nearly one-third of farmers anticipate that government regulations will affect their business in the next year. Tied for the second top issue, about one-quarter of farmers named the lack of land and resulting price increases as well as the instabilities of the global marketplace as their next biggest concerns.

Despite these challenges, an astounding 89% of farmers expect their operation to expand within the next five years. If you anticipate that your farming operation will grow in the near future, you will need to address the above concerns in order to succeed. Part of business planning is identifying and managing risks that can prevent your farm’s success. Contact the experts at Cline Wood to learn how we can help you reduce risk on your farm.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Solve the E-Commerce/Urban Delivery Problem

Posted September 3, 2018 by Administrator

In 2017, e-commerce sales reached $453.5 billion in revenue, and experts don’t anticipate this trend will slow down anytime soon. With a projected growth of 20% over the next two years, there is no doubt that the e-commerce industry is booming. However, this creates several complications for delivery drivers.

Top Issues Affecting Drivers in Urban Areas

Most delivery problems occur in the final 50 feet of the delivery. In urban areas, parking is already an issue, and truck drivers are struggling to find the curb space to unload their deliveries. It’s no secret that major cities have more traffic, but the rise of ride services like Uber and Lyft further complicate the already limited number of curbs. To put it in perspective, Lyft gave rides to more than 23 million people in 2017; Uber came in at four billion rides. That’s a lot of curb space and time that prevent drivers from making speedy deliveries.

Another factor compounding the urban delivery problem is dwell time. The amount of time it takes to complete a delivery affects traffic congestion in the city. The faster a driver can unload his or her deliveries, the faster he or she can be back on the road. The solution for this is three-fold.

  1. The first method to reduce dwell time is to implement better routes. Left-hand turns take more time and are likely to cause more accidents that right-hand turns. If drivers prepare their routes ahead of time to emphasize right-hand turns, they can reduce accidents and save themselves time.
  2. Another approach to reducing dwell time is to focus on new construction. By building loading bays into new builds, truck drivers have a designated location for pick-ups and deliveries.
  3. A final method that proved effective in a testing phase is to implement Common Carrier Locker Systems. These systems act as miniature distribution nodes that facilitate delivery density. Greater delivery density means lowered delivery costs and fewer stops. During a test run, Common Carrier Locker Systems reduced delivery times by 78%.

The proliferation of e-commerce orders and deliveries is creating new challenges for the trucking industry. Prolonged deliveries or failed first deliveries increase operation expenses, further shrinking already tight margins. If your trucking business is struggling to meet financial goals, Cline Wood can help. Contact us to learn innovative ways to reduce trucking costs.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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