How to Curb Digital Addiction in Your Fleet

Posted July 16, 2018 by Administrator

Driver safety is paramount to a fleet’s success. However, no amount of safety devices can contend with a distracted driver. Over one-third of millennials check their phones at least once per hour compared to 21% of the rest of the population. In fact, most people check their phones upward of 100 times per day.

The Problem with Digital Dependency

Being tied to technology creates a multitude of problems for drivers; however, the greatest is its effect on sleep. One survey found that over half of respondents slept with their phone next to their bed, 13% slept with their phone in their bed, and 3% slept with their phone in their hand. This creates a sense of urgency for every after-hour text, phone call, or email.

New messages disturb sleep and make employees feel like they need to respond right away. Driver fatigue is one of the known leading causes of accidents and fatalities in the transportation industry so it behooves fleets to get serious about how attached drivers are to their phones.

Finding Solutions to Improve Safety

The simplest solution to the reliance on cell phones is to stop multitasking. The vast majority of people who attempt to multitask fail to be effective. For example, drivers know they shouldn’t text and drive or talk on the phone and drive. However, a ping of a new message or phone call is often a tempting lure. Drivers can download apps that prevent non-urgent texts and emails from coming through, but the problem is not just with drivers.

Fleet managers often send the wrong signal when it comes to cell phone usage. For example, if a manager checks his or her phone several times during a conversation with a driver, that individual will likely feel like the manager isn’t paying attention. This can create a negative cycle where employees don’t bring forward problems or concerns due to a perceived lack of interest from management.

Managers should also pay attention to when they send emails. It may be a manager’s preference to send emails after hours, but this practice can make employees feel pressured to respond even though they aren’t on the clock. If this is the case, managers should set clear expectations that they don’t expect employees to read or respond to emails sent after hours until the following workday.

Technology isn’t going to go away or slow down anytime soon. However, how fleets and drivers manage their use of it has a big effect on overall safety. If your fleet is struggling with transportation safety, contact the experts at Cline Wood to learn how we can help.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Will Driver Pay Incentives Bring Needed Changes to the Trucking Industry?

Posted July 9, 2018 by Administrator

Some motor carrier fleets claim they have implemented dramatic changes to their compensation packages. But adding monetary incentives is not a unique idea. Granted, pay increases attract new, younger drivers and help to retain seasoned workers at a time when the need for drivers is skyrocketing throughout the trucking industry.

Many fleet professionals believe that a higher rate of pay is critical in order to solve the driver crisis. Furthermore, performance bonuses help to ensure quality of service and provide drivers with a reward for exemplary service.

A stronger economy, coupled with regulatory changes, is helping to drive the increased demand for higher wages. Drivers are leaving the profession at a rate faster than they can be replaced. Baby boomers are reaching retirement age and younger people in the workforce tend to have far more career options than the baby-boomer generation had.

The flow of drivers out of the industry and lack of enough drivers entering the profession has created a situation where drivers are in a position to demand better pay and better working conditions. Drivers want more than a pay-per-mile increase; they want total compensation and benefit packages that include sign-on bonuses.

These days, bonuses for the following are becoming increasingly popular as recruitment tools:

  • Safety
  • Miles driven
  • Tenure
  • Minimum weekly rates
  • Layover and vacation pay.

Drivers must deal with a great deal of stress while on the road, often due to increased regulations, shipper and receiver delays as well as tighter schedule demands.

However, while fleet owners understand the pressure placed on drivers, and appreciate that drivers deserve higher rates of pay, other factors, such as stagnant freight rates, has forced the industry as a whole to keep driver compensation static.

Rising freight rates are helping fleets make up the difference between escalating wage increases and budgetary constraints. As demand for motor carrier drivers continues to expand, some companies have become so frustrated they are reducing their workforce and lowering their productivity levels.

Drivers cite a myriad of issues that are placing barriers to recruiting new workers, including:

  • Paying drivers on a per mile or per-hour basis instead of salary
  • Failing lines of communication with fleet management and owners
  • Lack of sleep
  • Time away from home
  • Unpredictable miles
  • Ineffective administration
  • Spending time looking for trailers
  • Being detained for long load and unload periods of time
  • Poorly-set appointments
  • Lack of respect for their work.

Individual fleets need to look at their own workforce and find out why their drivers are not being retained. Generally, the highest turnover rate is in the first few months following a hire. Fleets suffer because the onboarding process is expensive. In order to help reduce a high rate of turnover in the first few months, make sure you target and attract the right potential employees. Increasing wages may help to attract new drivers, but they won’t stay if they can’t handle the lifestyle and frustrations of the job.

Fleets need to think about what it takes to attract millennials. Many will demand longer vacation times as well as earning a fair living wage despite clocking in fewer hours. There is still much work to be done to improve the market for attracting and retaining qualified, high-performing younger drivers.

Cline Wood is more than just an insurance agency. We tailor insurance and risk products and services that improve your bottom line. As a Cline Wood client, we care about your business; you can depend on the knowledge and experience of Cline Wood to help analyze and solve your needs. To learn more about how Cline Wood can help your trucking business, click here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

HOS House Bill Proposes to Alter Regulations for Livestock and Agriculture Haulers

Posted July 2, 2018 by Administrator

There have been a series of bills proposed this year that target Hours of Service (HOS) reforms in response to the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) mandate that went into effect in December 2017. The latest bill, filed in the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday, June 21, 2018, aims to reform the regulations for livestock/agriculture haulers. The bill would also allow the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to move faster on any rulemaking that would provide drivers with split sleeper berth flexibility. The new rule would make it faster and easier for drivers to maintain records under the ELD mandate.

The new bill, called The Honest Operators Undertake Road Safety Act (H.R. 6178), was introduced by Representatives Sanford Bishop (D-Georgia), Rick Crawford (R-Arkansas) and Bruce Westerman (R-Arkansas). The bill is the first to be backed by the American Trucking Association (ATA) this year. The ATA announced its support for the legislation on Thursday.

The bill targets the livestock and agriculture hauling sector specifically, like other HOS reform bills filed recently. This bill provides relatively small reforms, instead of a complete overhaul of the HOS rules and regulations. The HOURS act would provide exemptions to truck drivers that are hauling livestock and agriculture commodities, allowing them to be exempt from HOS limits and duty status records. The bill, if passed, would apply year-round as long as the driver is within a 150 air-mile radius of the source of the livestock or agriculture product. Some of the other bills have included time-limitations during state-designated planting and harvesting seasons.

A big part of the HOURS Act is the reduction in supporting documents drivers would be required to maintain. Current regulations require drivers to keep at least eight supporting documents on hand for the previous 24-hour work period. HOS supporting documents include:

  • Fuel receipts
  • Bills of lading
  • Dispatch records.

The new regulation, if passed, would allow drivers to legally maintain only two documents per day, one verifying their start time and the other the end of their workday. The bill would also allow FMCSA to permit more flexible split sleeper options, such as 5-5, 6-4 and 7-3. Current regulations dictate a strict split sleeper berth time to 8 and 2 hours, for the required 10 hour off-duty period every 24 hours.

If FMCSA does propose a rule to alter split sleeper times, the HOURS Act would allow the agency to skip the required process of rulemaking and move directly to rule proposal and accepting public comments.

The HOURS Act would directly impact short-haul as well as long-haul drivers. A short-haul driver is defined as someone who operates within 150 air-miles of their work reporting location. Under the proposed bill, short-haul drivers would be exempt from HOS regs and the ELD mandate if they complete their work day within 14 hours. Current regulations allow this only for non-CDL drivers operating under the short-haul exemption.

To learn more about transportation industry news, trucking coverage and risk management, contact Cline Wood here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Manage Financial Risk on the Farm

Posted June 26, 2018 by Administrator

Managing a farm is a risky venture. Farmers can encounter production problems, environmental hazards, and financial risks. In fact, recent years underscored just how dramatically farming finances can fluctuate. From 2011 to 2014, farm income averaged $105 billion annually. By the close of 2015, this number plummeted to $56 billion. In an environment where profits can decrease by almost half in a short span of time, farmers need a solid plan in place to survive economic difficulties. The following suggestions can help farmers stay afloat during periods of financial uncertainty.

  1. Always pay attention to the little things. In prosperous times, it’s easy not to worry about the small stuff. A few extra dollars here, not getting the best deal there—it’s not concerning when cash flow is positive and ledger margins are in the black. However, when crunch times strike without warning, these behaviors will make a difficult situation worse. Making every dollar every day count can be the difference between surviving an economic downswing and folding under the pressure.
  2. Develop a reliable accounting system. Farmers can’t hope to build a successful agribusiness if they don’t track their finances with an appropriate system. Investing in enterprise accounting software can help farmers manage accounts payable, accounts receivable, billing, payroll, and more.
  3. Don’t rely on the value of the land. When the value of goods and services goes down so too does the value of land. Not only that, but land is not a liquid asset. Farmers can’t easily convert land into cash, and a rapid sale can result in a loss of profits. In addition, banks are less than impressed by real estate as a means of repaying loans. Instead, farmers should focus their efforts on products and services that generate cash so they can pay down debt.
  4. Make decisions. When the economy begins to turn, family businesses such as farms often feel the squeeze before major organizations operating on huge margins do. Many farmers feel crippled by the fear of making a wrong financial decision. However, inaction can prove much more lethal to a family farm than action can. For example, lenders will grow frustrated and less willing to work with farms that skirt their inquiries than those that at least respond. A willingness to navigate an uncertain future is much better than remaining frozen during an economic storm.

Managing finances on tight margins isn’t easy, but Cline Wood can help. As a top provider of agribusiness insurance, we go beyond providing coverage. We work with agribusinesses to understand their risks and implement strategies to manage them during difficult times. Contact us today to learn how we can help your agribusiness.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Reduce the Likelihood of Sexual Harassment in Agribusiness

Posted June 13, 2018 by Administrator

Sexual harassment isn’t an issue that is unique to farming. However, the conditions common to farming present a significant number of opportunities and the victims often lack resources to make it stop. A significant portion of the problem occurs when farmers contract out their labor rather than hiring their workers directly. These farmhands are often unfamiliar with harassment laws or don’t know their rights. They also fear retaliation for speaking out so they remain silent.

How to Recognize Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment isn’t always overt, as it can be verbal as well physical. It can occur before, during, or after working hours when a supervisor or co-worker makes unwelcome advances while operating within the scope of employment. Examples of sexual harassment include:

  • Unwanted sexual commentary, jokes, written notes, or derogatory remarks of a sexual nature
  • Unwanted and intentional touching of a sexual nature or on an intimate area of the body
  • Wielding a position of authority to extort sexual favors in exchange for a promotion or preferential treatment

Any sexual action that creates a hostile work environment opens an employer up to a sexual harassment lawsuit.

Employers’ and Supervisors’ Obligations to Farm Workers

Any authority figure on the farm needs to take pains to avoid committing harassing behaviors as well as identify and correct inappropriate employee conduct. Supervisors who fail to put a stop to sexual harassment can be held liable in a lawsuit for tolerating offensive behavior. As such, all farming operations need to have a complaint procedure that allows victims to report harassment without fear of retribution. Employers should also include at least one female employee as a complaint receiver as many female victims don’t feel comfortable reporting to a male.

Farms should also implement clear disciplinary guidelines for sexual harassment claims. By following procedures every time, employers can eliminate the perception of discrimination or preferential treatment. Employers should also follow up on any reports of harassment to ensure it actually stops. When cases of employee sexual harassment make it to the courtroom, judges consider if the employer learned about the problem as soon as possible, how the employer addressed it, and what steps the employer took to prevent it in the future.

Protecting Employees and the Farm

Farming operations accused of creating a hostile work environment due to sexual harassment can find themselves at the center of an expensive lawsuit. Farms often operate on tight budgets, and a lawsuit can be enough to shut it down permanently. While taking steps to prevent sexual harassment in the first place is key, farmers can also invest in insurance to protect themselves and their agribusiness. Contact Cline Wood to learn more.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How the Denham Amendment Could Impact the Trucking Industry If Passed

Posted June 11, 2018 by Administrator

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reauthorization bill that passed in the House in late April 2018 could have serious implications for the trucking industry if it passes the Senate as well.

The so-called “Denham” bill, named after it’s sponsor Representative Jeff Denham, has had mixed reactions from the trucking industry. Some organizations, such as the American Trucking Association (ATA) believes the amendment will help streamline interstate commerce by providing a federal standard for hour-of-service (HOS) rules. But other industry groups believe the amendment will rob truck drivers of needed rest and rightful compensation.

The amendment was originally a part of the FAST ACT passed by congress in December, but this amendment didn’t make the cut, so that’s why it’s been tacked on to the FAA bill.

Here is a breakdown of how the amendment could impact the industry.

The amendment seeks to pre-empt state laws related to rest breaks. It would require all truck drivers to abide by the Department of Transportation (DOT) hours-of-service regulations first.

  • The amendment would allow drivers to follow the federal guidelines for taking breaks, which are not as stringent as some states, such as California. California requires a 10-minute rest break for every two-hours worked and a 30-minute meal break every five hours worked. The federal guidelines require drivers to take a 30-minute break every 8 hours, which is now enforced by electronic logging devices (ELDs).
  • The amendment also prevents drivers from being paid for the breaks they take (California pays drivers for their breaks).
  • Drivers can still take breaks, but they would lose money by doing so.

The ATA wants a unified system that is seamless in order to facilitate interstate commerce. However, drivers’ rights and general wellbeing may be impacted if the amendment passes.

  • The amendment would permit drivers to disregard state HOS regulations, which might speed up shipment times.
  • However, the amendment could deter drivers from taking needed breaks in the interest of a reduction in compensation, which could lead to an increase in accidents, injuries, property damage and even death due to driver-fatigue.
  • The amendment would impact drivers’ wages because trucking companies would no longer be required to meet state wage requirements; they would only have to meet the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

This amendment could have a serious impact on the trucking industry.

  • Drivers may struggle to get better pay, which is especially critical as the truck driver turnover rate is approaching 100 percent.
  • Interstate commerce would be streamlined, but drivers may experience ELD implementation issues or become dissatisfied and leave the industry.
  • Drivers may not get the rest they need, which could exacerbate the sleep apnea problem in the industry as well as contribute to the high rate of commercial truck crashes.

Shippers may also be impacted. On one hand, the amendment would allow a more streamlined system for interstate commerce, which could allow shippers to get shipments out faster. On the other hand, if the amendment creates more issues for drivers and further increases the turnover rate, it could cause rates to increase. The Denham amendment has yet to pass the Senate, so the impact of the potential bill remains to be seen.

To learn more transportation industry news, trucking coverage and risk management, contact us here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

5 Things You Need to Know About Tesla’s New Semi-Truck

Posted June 5, 2018 by Administrator

Tesla’s new semi-truck has taken the transportation industry by storm. Marking its first foray into commercial trucking, Tesla’s heavy-duty vehicle is a striking divergence from the norm. This 100% electric, aerodynamic semi-truck stands out from other standard Class 8 Trucks. Tesla’s aptly named Semi boasts speed, range, and a rapid recharge time—all features that are catching the eyes of big name companies like Walmart, Pepsi, FedEx, UPS, Anheuser-Busch, and more. The following are several facts about Tesla’s Semi.

  1. How fast is Tesla’s Semi? Without any cargo, the Semi can go from 0 to 60 in five seconds. When fully loaded with 80,000 pounds worth of freight, it can achieve this feat in 20 seconds. This is even more impressive considering a standard semi-truck requires 15 seconds and 60 seconds to achieve the same speeds unloaded and loaded. It can also ascend a 5% grade with a full load at 65 mile per hour—a standard commercial truck maxes out at 45 miles per hour.
  2. How far can it travel before it needs to recharge? With a full load, the Semi can travel 500 miles before it will need to recharge. After a 30-minute recharge, it can travel an additional 400 miles.
  3. What type of transportation is the Semi suited to? With a 500-mile range, the most likely uses of the Semi will be short and medium-hauls. For example, it is ideal for transporting cargo from ports to distribution facilities.
  4. What are the Semi’s safety features? The Semi will come equipped with Tesla’s Enhanced Autopilot, which includes self-driving features such as steering around corners, staying within the lane, adjusting cruise control speed based on traffic patterns, changing lanes, and more. What’s more, the Semi will be able to platoon with other trucks.
  5. How much does a Semi cost? On a day-to-day basis, the Semi costs $1.26 per mile compared to $1.51 per mile for a standard semi-truck. It also costs less to maintain because there are fewer moving parts. As for overall costs, Tesla will charge $150-$180,000 depending on the version.

Electronic trucks represent a significant disruption to the transportation industry. Drivers and fleets need to be prepared to adapt to these new changes and challenges, and Cline Wood is here to help. As a leading provider of transportation insurance products, we go beyond providing basic insurance coverage. We are active members of the trucking community, and we strive to stay up to date with the latest innovations reshaping the industry. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help your transportation business.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Driver Safety – Preventing Heat Related Accidents

Posted May 31, 2018 by Erin

DRIVER SAFETY: PREVENTING HEAT-RELATED ACCIDENTS

Whether they’re driving, unloading, tarping, or any number of other tasks they perform on a daily basis, your drivers are working in the heat during the summer months.  They may not realize it, but the summer heat presents a serious risk to their health if they don’t take proper precautions to avoid heat exhaustion, or worse heat stroke.

At Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency, it’s our mission to partner with you in ensuring your drivers are safe, accident-free, and avoid costly claims that can have a major impact on both your drivers and your business. Below are several great heat stress tips that we strongly encourage you to share with your drivers and incorporate into your safety training.

Keep employees as cool as possible

Encourage your employees to use these tips for staying safe in the heat:

  • Drink plenty of water. In hot weather, drink enough to quench your thirst. The average adult needs eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day and even more during heat spells.
  • Dress for the weather. When outdoors, wear lightweight clothing made of natural fabrics and a well-ventilated hat.
  • Stay inside if possible. Do strenuous outdoor tasks early or late in the day.
  • Eat light. Replace heavy or hot meals with lighter, refreshing foods.

Heat exhaustion, heat stress and heat stroke are not to be messed around with. If an employee starts to experience:

  • Dizziness, weakness, nausea, headache and vomiting
  • Blurry vision
  • Body temperature rising to 101°F
  • Sweaty skin
  • Feeling hot and thirsty
  • Difficulty speaking

Get the person cooled down, out of the sun and the necessary medical assistance.

Read more about the symptoms and first aid treatments on our MMA blog and also learn more about Resources available from OSHA/NIOSH, including their Heat Safety Tool and how it can help you determine the heat index, precautions to take in the day’s heat and more.

For more information or assistance, please contact us at safetrucking@clinewood.com.  We appreciate your safety efforts!

 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

5 Serious Risks for Poultry Farms

Posted May 28, 2018 by Administrator

There are several risks involved with poultry farming. However, infection disease is the biggest and most concerning. That is why poultry farmers need to practice good biosecurity to reduce incidents of disease. The following are the most common sources of disease in poultry farming.

  1. The stock itself. The fowls can carry and transmit disease, dead birds in particular. Poultry farmers need to be careful when disposing of deceased animals to prevent the spread of infectious disease. Farmers should also take care when moving poultry stock from one area of the farm to another as this represents another opportunity for the spread of disease.
  2. Vehicles and farming equipment. Famers can unwittingly spread contagions by transporting and using contaminated equipment. For example, if a farmer transported dead birds in a wagon and then loaded that same wagon with feed later, disease may infiltrate the feed.
  3. The animals’ feed. Continuing with the above, feed can transfer disease in several ways. In addition to transporting feed in a contaminated vehicle, rodents can infiltrate it and leave behind disease. Farmers should take great care when transporting and storing their feed to prevent infection.
  4. People on the farm. Farmers may think only visitors pose a risk for spreading disease, but this is not the case. Any workers or individuals who live on the farm are also a threat. Anyone can transfer disease from their shoes as they come and go on the farm.
  5. Water. This is the main source for the spread of disease. Any feces that make it into the water can contaminate it and infect animals across the farm.

Farmers can take several steps to prevent the spread of disease. Implementing common sense biosecurity measures such as not allowing vehicles into the production area, situating production areas far from water sources, treating all drinking water before allowing animals to ingest it, and utilizing freezers for managing the disposal of dead poultry. There is no one simple method for preventing disease on poultry farms, but following the above practices can help. Contact the experts at Cline Wood to learn more about reducing risk on your poultry farm.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Count Women in Trucking When the Numbers Don’t Add Up

Posted May 21, 2018 by Administrator

The Women in Trucking Association (WIT) is a non-profit organization dedicated to encouraging the employment of women in trucking as well as promoting their accomplishments and reducing the hurdles they face. So, it should come as no surprise that WIT has a vested interested in the statistics surrounding women in the trucking industry. When the department of labor (DOL) reported that women drivers dipped to 5.1%, WIT raised an eyebrow at the statistic. After examining how DOL obtained its data, WIT realized DOL wasn’t tracking accurate job positions or counting the right women.

WIT Joins Forces with NTI

To find the most accurate data regarding women in trucking, WIT collaborated with the National Transportation Institute (NTI) to amend the questions researchers ask trucking companies. NTI added two new questions to help distinguish between women truck drivers and women leaders in transportation companies. With this new line of inquiry, NTI found that women truck drivers accounted for 7.13% in January of 2017. This percentage grew to 7.89% by the end of the year. Women in management saw similar growth from 23% at the start of 2017 to 23.75% by its close.

These numbers differ from DOL’s. For the same timeframe, DOL reported women accounted for 5.1% of truck drivers and 18.1% of leadership positions within trucking companies. WIT contends this is because what DOL counted as truck driving jobs were not always accurate reflections of traditional drivers. As a result, DOL’s numbers became less reliable. To monitor the true number of women in the trucking industry better, WIT and NTI developed the WIT Index.

Combating the Driver Shortage

While WIT and NTI took a deeper look at the number of women in trucking, the gender divide remains stark. Although WIT aims to help women achieve positions at all levels within the trucking industry, they believe more women in leadership positions will reap the most rewards. If women can see other women in positions of power, it helps remove fears of male-dominated workplaces with limited upward trajectory. This can encourage more women to apply for trucking positions and help ease the driver shortage.

Trucking companies have a diverse array of problems to contend with—the driver shortage being one of the most pressing. As a leader in transportation insurance, Cline Wood strives to find solutions that meet trucking companies’ need. Contact us today to learn how we can help your trucking business.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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