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National Safety Month – Impairment

Posted June 28, 2019 by Scott Dunwiddie

 

The Scope of the Problem

Each year in the United States, over 10,000 people die in alcohol-impaired driving crashes, accounting for almost 30% of all traffic-related deaths. Of the over 1,200 traffic deaths among children ages 0 to 14 years, approximately 17% involved an alcohol-impaired driver.1 According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), “Drugs other than alcohol are involved in about 16% of motor vehicle crashes.” As more states relax or eliminate criminal laws against marijuana use, traffic incidents involving marijuana-impaired drivers have increased. Approximately 13% of all nighttime, weekend drivers have measurable amounts of marijuana in their system. Marijuana users were about 25% more likely to be involved in a crash than drivers with no evidence of marijuana use, however other factors such as age and gender may account for the increased crash risk among marijuana users.2 In addition to crash involvement, more than 1 million drivers are arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics in the U.S. each year.

At-Risk Drivers

At all levels of blood alcohol concentration (BAC), the risk of being involved in a crash is greater for young people than for older people.3 Among drivers with BAC levels of 0.08% or higher involved in fatal crashes each year, over one-fourth (26%) were ages 21 to 24 and nearly three in ten (27%) were between 25 and 34 years of age.4

Crash studies have revealed that a significant percentage of motorcyclists are riding while impaired. Among motorcyclists killed in fatal crashes each year, approximately 25% had BACs of 0.08% or greater.5 Further, the CDC found, “Motorcyclists ages 35-39 have the highest percentage of deaths with BACs of 0.08% or greater.”6

In addition to young adults and motorcyclists, drivers with prior driving while impaired (DWI) convictions often demonstrated impaired driving behaviors. In fact, according to the CDC, “Drivers with a BAC of 0.08% or higher involved in fatal crashes were 4.5 times more likely to have had a prior conviction for DWI than were drivers with no alcohol in their system. (9% and 2%, respectively)”.7

Preventing Deaths and Injuries from Impaired Driving8

Effective regulatory measures to reduce the incidence of impaired driving include:
• Actively enforcing existing BAC laws, minimum legal drinking age laws, and zero tolerance laws for drivers younger than 21 years old.
• Requiring ignition interlocks for all offenders, including first-time offenders.
• Using sobriety checkpoints.
• Putting health promotion efforts into practice that influence economic, organizational, policy, and school/community action.
• Using community-based approaches to alcohol control and DWI prevention.
• Requiring mandatory substance abuse assessment and treatment, if needed, for DWI offenders.
• Raising the unit price of alcohol by increasing taxes.

Effective personal measures to reduce the incidence of impaired driving include:
• Whenever your social plans involve alcohol and/or drugs, pre-plan so that you don’t have to drive while impaired.
• Before drinking, designate a non-drinking driver when with a group.
• Don’t let your friends drive impaired.
• If you have been drinking or using drugs, get a ride home, use a rideshare service or call a taxi.
• If you’re hosting a party where alcohol will be served, remind your guests to plan ahead and designate their sober driver.
• If you’re hosting a party, offer alcohol-free beverages, and make sure all guests leave with a sober driver.

Sources: https://medlineplus.gov/impaireddriving.html
https://www.cdc.gov/MotorVehicleSafety/Impaired_Driving/impaired-drv_factsheet.html (All endnotes)

Opioids and the Workforce

Clearing the Air on Marijuana

Opioids in the Workplace: What Employers Need to Kn

National Safety Month – Fatigue

Posted June 20, 2019 by Erin

In the commercial transportation world, competition for business is fierce and trucks are often running day and night to meet deadlines.  An unfortunate consequence of these irregular working hours on trucking company employees, and drivers in particular, is fatigue.  According to David Lombardi, a research scientist at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, “Fatigue is an increasing health and safety problem in our daily lives due to the 24-hour society with decreasing emphasis on sleep….” ¹

Effects of fatigue include:

  • Slower reaction time
  • More errors
  • Decreased cognitive ability
  • Decreased sleep quality
  • Moodiness
  • Decreased metabolism and cardiovascular health ²,³

For a trucking company, that can be a scary proposition and result in a much greater probability of catastrophic highway accidents, injuries and fatalities.

So, what can be done to help reduce the effects of fatigue?

According to the National Sleep Foundation and NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health), shift workers/drivers should:

  • Try taking a walk right before the shift starts – ideally in daylight, which can be a stimulant
  • Drink beverages with caffeine in them, such as coffee and soda, during the first half of the shift
  • Take short breaks during the shift and move around
  • Have several consecutive hours of off-duty time each day
  • Be educated on the effects of fatigue, how to avoid fatigue, and available resources 4

For more valuable insight on fatigue, please click on the article links below.  We at Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency, appreciate your dedication to safety!

1,2 Fatigue and Worker Safety. Trotto, S. (2017, February 26). Retrieved June 18, 2019, from https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/15271-fatigue-and-worker-safety

3,4 Shift Worker Health and Safety Druley, K. (2018, December 20). Retrieved June 18, 2019, from https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/17852-shift-worker-health-and-safety

NSC: 70% of Workers are Tired on the Job

 

Meet Our Claims & Risk Consulting Team

Posted June 10, 2019 by Erin

Meet our Claims & Risk Consulting Team

As a client of Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency, you have full access to a broad spectrum of risk management services, as well as a committed partner in managing your business from a safety perspective. We are very proud of, and excited about the team we’ve assembled to help educate and guide our clients regarding safety best practices.


Read Steve Page’s Consultant Spotlight here!

 


Read Kenny Ray’s Consultant Spotlight here!

 


Read Scott Dunwiddie’s Consultant Spotlight here!

We have found our most valuable resource is our ability to act as an in-house safety consultant for our clients. We work closely with our clients to understand their needs and collaborate with them to make sure we are providing REAL VALUE to their program. Our goal is to provide our resources to improve their company’s overall safety culture, therefore increasing their overall profitability.

This can be accomplished by enhancing the existing safety program by focusing on two main areas that most transportation and logistics firms struggle with:

Claims Consultation, Strategy and Advocacy
We understand the cost of claims, and we work with our clients to minimize the various exposures. Our in house claims department serves as an advocate for our clients on issues such as coverage, self-insured retentions, and document production. This department provides multi-party or one-on-one consultation related to the investigation, reserving, subrogation and timely settlement of the client’s claims. We work with our clients to evaluate their claims reporting processes to mitigate losses and aggressively adjudicate claims.

Individualized Safety and Risk Education and Consultation
Whether it be mentoring, educating or advocating, our risk consulting team is ready to work hands on with our clients to tailor our services to their insurance and risk management needs. Our team understands the risk, safety, loss prevention and claims support needs that your company has and can work with you to develop a strong safety culture to help you succeed in the current transportation industry. We partner with our clients to provide resolutions to and/or education on any number of client challenges. Here are just a few of the safety services we provide:

  • Review of current safety policies & procedures through internal DOT and OSHA compliance guidance. Identify regulatory and cultural gaps, develop corrective actions and deliver training specific to the identified needs.
  • Evaluate current driver recruiting and hiring guidelines and driver retention practices. Assist in building future hiring guidelines with further training considered to better develop new drivers.
  • Evaluating initial driver orientation and ongoing driver training for driving and WC with emphasis on defensive driving and industry-specific practices (proper lifting, trips, slips and falls, etc.).

We look forward to partnering with you to establish a high level safety culture by determining your current transportation safety strengths and weaknesses through the initiatives outlined above.

 

 

 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

 

3 Farmers Facing Jail Time for Crop Insurance Fraud

Posted December 13, 2018 by Administrator

Tobacco Fraud Nets 60 Months Jail Time

Crop insurance fraud carries heavy penalties including steep fines and jail time. However, these deterrents don’t always work as intended. Crop insurance fraud comes in a variety of forms, and the following cases highlight some of the potential abuses.

Debra Muse of Willingford, Kentucky pleaded guilty to fraud on April 16, 2018. The judge sentenced her to 60 months of jail time as well as ordered her to pay $1,656,275 in restitution. She and several cohorts filed false claims with the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) in an attempt to obtain insurance money without actual cause.

They did so by falsifying tobacco production reports, bills,and shipping documents. As a result, they received inflated payments from their insurers who then sought recompense from the federal government. Under federal law, Muse will have to serve 85% of her sentence (51 months minimum) before she is eligible for release.

LaGrange Farmer Receives 25-Month Jail Sentence for Fraud

On May 30, 2018, a judge sentenced James Wiggins, Jr. of LaGrange, NC to 25 months of jail time and ordered him to pay $5,600,433 for several offenses including identity theft, conspiring to commit money laundering, and making false statements to the FCIC. Wiggins and his co-conspirators filed false insurance claims as well as disaster relief claims and then engaged in illegal activities to try to conceal the fraud. They filed false claims alleging they lost crops to receive an insurance payout while selling the healthy crops in secret transactions.

Farmer Faces up to 30 Years per False Statement

Though not yet scheduled, Christopher Hickerson, a farmer from Lexington, KY is facing a ten-count indictment for making false statements to the FCIC. Dating back as far as 2009, Hickerson falsified his tobacco production while simultaneously claiming a significant amount of damage. Hickerson laid claim to tobacco produced by other farmers to inflate his claims. He also obtained crop insurance under other individuals’ names to capitalize on new producer insurance bonuses. For every false statement made to the FCIC, Hickerson faces 30 years in prison as well as a fine of $1,000,000.

As outlined above, crop insurance fraud is not worth the cost. At Cline Wood, we dedicate our time to helping farmers and other agribusiness leaders understand their insurance needs. To learn more about the risks facing your farm as well as how to protect against them, contact us.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh& McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions,conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Developing an Effective Hazardous Materials Training Program

Posted April 19, 2018 by Erin

As the American economy has developed over the years, the transportation of hazardous materials has become a vital service to businesses and consumers alike.  These materials are used in so many ways, including cleaning our water, helping to grow our food, running our cars, and providing medicine to our families.  However, with these types of materials come significant safety risks (including chemical burns) – to truck drivers and anyone else who might come in contact with the materials.  In fact, #2 on OSHA’s Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards for 2017 involved improper communication and training as it relates to hazardous chemicals.1

As an example of hazardous materials training in action, just recently a tanker truck carrying hydrochloric acid was involved in an accident with a train in Pennsylvania.  According to news reports, the acid spilled onto the roadway and billowed into the air.  Another truck driver familiar with hydrochloric acid was working nearby when the collision took place.  He knew what to do, grabbed his safety equipment, and rushed to the scene to give the driver of the tanker truck an oxygen mask while getting him to safety.2

To take the first step toward preventing risk of injury and becoming a safe operation, we strongly encourage you to develop a comprehensive hazardous materials training program.  Whether it’s a program that you develop from scratch or an existing training program that you enhance, an effective training program has many benefits, including3:

  • Develops a strong safety culture
  • Heightens employee safety by helping employees protect themselves
  • Improves a company’s effectiveness, efficiency, and productivity
  • Increases employee skills
  • May prevent regulatory sanctions
  • Aids in ensuring safe and secure shipments of hazardous materials
  • Reduces likelihood of catastrophic events such as fire or spill
  • Provides employees with understanding of why compliance and safety are necessary

Please click HERE to review and download a free guide from the USDOT, and get started developing your program TODAY!  For questions on this topic or to request a safety consultation contact Cline Wood’s Safety & Risk Management Team at 888-451-3900 or safetrucking@clinewood.com.

 

Scott Dunwiddie
Director of Risk Management
Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC company

 

Sources:

1 “Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards”, https://www.osha.gov/Top_Ten_Standards.html, Accessed 3/28/18

2“What You Should Know: A Guide to Developing a Hazardous Materials Training Program”, U.S. Department of Transportation – Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

3 “Road reopens, residents allowed back in homes after train crashes into truck hauling acid”, https://www.wpxi.com/news/top-stories/road-reopens-residents-allowed-back-in-homes-after-train-crashes-into-truck-hauling-acid/711807985, Accessed 3/28/18

 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

 

 

 

Attention all Kansas CDL Holders – Free Human Trafficking Training

Posted February 16, 2018 by Erin

KMCA is partnering with Truckers Against Trafficking to offer online webinar training on human trafficking. Beginning July 1, 2018, Kansas CDL holders must have certification on human trafficking training to renew their license. This online webinar is a fantastic way to get ahead of the curve to ensure you and your drivers have the required certification before your CDL expires. The training will educate and equip you to understand the human trafficking issue and, more importantly, empower you to take the steps necessary that could end up saving a life. There will be three opportunities to join an online webinar to get your TAT certification, this training is free to attend for everyone, but registration is required.

February 21, 2018 – CLICK HERE TO REGISTER – 8:30 a.m. Central Time

March 12, 2018 – CLICK HERE TO REGISTER – 2:30 p.m. Central Time

April 18, 2018 – CLICK HERE TO REIGSTER – 12:00 p.m. Central Time


Please Note: After registration a link for the training will be provided in a separate email notification from Truckers Against Trafficking.

Content is originally from Kansas Motor Carriers Association. Visit their page here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Preventing Slips, Trips and Falls

Posted June 26, 2017 by Erin

Sometimes all it takes is one time slipping on a wet surface to cause a debilitating injury to a worker’s back, a broken bone, or worse.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 800 work-related fatalities and over 300,000 total work-related injuries due to slips, trips and falls in 2015.[1]

Once an injury occurs, a worker is typically unable to work for an extended period of time, potentially meaning less income.  There could also be significant medical expenses and decreased ability to conduct your normal daily activities, making it difficult to take care of your loved ones.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

    1. ONLY WEAR STURDY, WATERPROOF WORK BOOTS
      This helps keep your feet dry and prevents them from slipping off most surfaces.  NO flip flops, slides, or sandals.
    2. MAKE SURE YOUR WORK BOOTS HAVE GOOD NON-SLIP TREAD
      This helps give you good traction in adverse weather conditions and prevents slips/falls.  If your work boots are old, chances are good the tread is worn down and it’s time for a new pair.
    3. MAKE SURE YOUR WORK BOOTS HAVE A STEEL SAFETY TOE
      This helps prevent injuries from bumps or items accidentally dropped on your foot.
    4. REVIEW YOUR SURROUNDINGS
      Look around you to see if there are any potential hazards, like potholes, water/snow on the ground, etc.
    5. USE THREE POINTS OF CONTACT
      When getting in or getting out of your truck or trailer, make sure you have either two hands and one foot, or two feet and one hand making contact with the truck the whole time.  This helps ensure stability.

     

    If you follow these basic guidelines you will drastically reduce the chance of a slip, trip or fall type of accident.  Your employer and your family will also appreciate your efforts to work safer and come home happy and healthy at the end of the workday.

    If you should have any questions regarding the information above or would like to discuss other safety topics, please don’t hesitate to contact Cline Wood at 888-451-3900 or safetrucking@clinewood.com.

    [1] Sources: https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2016/4836-fatal-work-injuries-in-the-united-states-during-2015.htm; https://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/osh2.pdf


    This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

NEW MMA MARKETLINK BENEFITS PROGRAM AVAILABLE

Posted November 10, 2015 by Administrator

Confused by all the changes in the healthcare industry? Want to know how much health insurance would cost you? Fill out a simple form and receive personalized quotes, matching you and your family’s needs for Health, Life & Supplemental Insurance. Click the MARKETLINK button below to learn more.

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Havor Lines’ driver manager wins TCA weight loss competition

Posted August 23, 2013 by Administrator

Havor Lines a Superior, Wis.,-based carrier, swept both the team and individual honors in the Truckload Carriers Association’s third Trucking’s Weight Loss Showdown. Keith Kitch, a driver manager at Havor Lines, was the individual winner, losing 22.4 percent of his body weight. The Havor team lost a total of 380 pounds, or 13.2 percent of their collective body weight. Each member of the team lost at least 5 percent of his or her own weight.

>>Read Full Trucking.com Article

Cline Wood University Article in Oklahoma Motor Carriers Magazine

Posted July 30, 2013 by Administrator

Cline Wood Agency, known for its commercial agribusiness and trucking insurance, has a new offering – Cline Wood University.

Cline Wood University covers various topics of interest related to the Trucking and Agribusiness industries.  It will be made available for all interested parties to view at any time at clinewood.com under the Cline Wood University tab.

Cline Wood recently held their first seminar, “New Hours of Service Changes – Impact on Driver Dispatch and Operations”, on April 18th with high attendance and excellent feedback from participants. The initial attendance was very strong and they expect this following to continue to grow. Cline Wood will be hosting these seminars on a monthly basis (look for a schedule of dates and topics at clinewood.com shortly). The goal of this program is to educate and inform our business partners on important topics and issues that impact our industry every day.

“I am looking forward to continuing the success of our first webinar,” said Tom Dickmeyer, CEO of Cline Wood Agency. “We saw the need to address critical issues and important topics. The attendance and positive feedback is exciting. We look forward to the opportunity to connect to those in the agribusiness and trucking industries to strengthen and build knowledge.”

For more information about Cline Wood Agency visit www.clinewood.com or call (888) 451-3900.

Founded in 1984, Cline Wood Agency serves as a national commercial property and casualty insurance agency focused exclusively on the two industries we know best; commercial trucking and agribusiness. Cline Wood Agency has three offices throughout the Mid-West with its headquarters at 4300 W 133rd Street, Leawood, Kansas. More information is available online at www.clinewood.com.


Oklahoma Motor Carriers Magazine is a part of the Oklahoma Trucking Association.

Copyright © 2019 Cline Wood.