Viewing posts categorised under: Transportation

The “Top 5 Stable Crash Predictors” for truck drivers

Posted May 20, 2019 by Erin

The “Top 5 Stable Crash Predictors” for truck drivers, according to analysis performed by the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) are:

  1. A past crash;
  2. An improper lane/location conviction;
  3. A reckless/careless/inattentive/negligent driving conviction;
  4. An improper/erratic lane changes conviction; and,
  5. An improper lane change violation.

ATRI, a research organization affiliated with the American Trucking Associations, conducted three, large-scale ‘Predicting Truck Crash Involvement’ studies since 2005, and these top 5 stable crash predictors were identified as common, crash-predictive behaviors in each of the three studies. Go here to obtain ATRI’s latest crash predictor study: https://truckingresearch.org/2018/07/31/predicting-truck-crash-involvement-2018-update/

 

Originally Published by Scopelitis Transportation Consulting, LLC May 15, 2019. https://www.scopelitisconsulting.com/the-top-5-stable-crash-predictors-for-truck-drivers/

It’s Time to Stop Distracted Driving!

Posted April 26, 2019 by Erin

It’s no surprise that distracted driving is currently at its worst on our nation’s highways. Distracted driving incidents come up every day on the highways and interstates, but now regular occurrences are even in city streets, parking lots and neighborhoods – and April is National Distracted Driving Month!

Just count the times in the last two days you found yourself really frustrated with someone so distracted with some type of electronic device that you would have liked to really awaken them to how soon their lives, the lives of loved ones, or others on the road, could be drastically impacted!

Included (here) is a link to a video I would like you to watch. WARNING: CONTAINS GRAPHIC FOOTAGE. Some may have seen this before.  When you watch things like this, distracted driving and fatigue clearly come to mind.  This crash changed numerous families’ lives as well as the driver.  And it all could have been prevented!

Nowadays, as I find myself with many miles behind a windshield, I look for several things when approaching a tractor trailer –  just to test how distracted people in our industry might be. As I approach the tractor trailer I try to stay back a distance to set my pace and check the driver’s speed, the driver’s professionalism and how well they are controlling their vehicle in the conditions around them.  There are many that do a fantastic job and make me proud to be a safety advocate of the transportation industry.  However, there are staggering percentages on the road today that disappoint me, and make a bad name for the rest of the professional truck drivers who do an excellent job of maintaining safety best practices on the road.

So how do we fix this problem that is taking so many lives each day on our nation’s highways?

I know as you read this article, you are thinking: “I don’t have this problem”.  Well, unfortunately we all have this problem. If you really are truthful with yourself and look at the many things we all do while driving a tractor trailer, or even your personal car down the highway, street, or across the parking lot you would scare yourself.

Distractions are everywhere and in every facet of life. Whether it be visual, audible, mental, eating or even emotional distractions. These are the leading distractions in most findings of crashes as we fail to react to our surroundings in a timely manner.

Even more shocking is that many distracted driving accidents were with drivers 40 years of age or older. So we can’t just blame the younger drivers.

Distractions inhibit one’s ability to perceive hazards and react properly in time. The most common distractions for drivers are cell phones, passengers, eating/drinking, day dreaming, and objects outside the vehicle – like road signs. Turning one’s attention away from driving for any of these distractions, even for a few seconds, eliminates the ability to react properly to hazards and can lead to a severe crash.

Stopping distance is calculated by multiplying current speed (MPH) times 1.5. The result is feet traveled per second (FTS). For example, a tractor-trailer traveling at 65 MPH travels approximately 100 feet per second (65 x 1.5 = 97.5 FTS). At this speed, one can travel the length of a football field (300 ft.) in just a few seconds. 

A lot of bad things can happen in that time if you are not completely focused on the road ahead and around you.  So in this day and time, when we are given all these great electronic tools and devices and our lives have become so busy that we feel forced to accomplish multiple tasks every waking hour, how do we stop this cycle?

By reducing your distractions behind the wheel!

  • Plan ahead – You should review your trip in detail before leaving and program your GPS accordingly if you use one. If adjustments are needed in your route, pull off the highway onto an on ramp or lot and enter a new destination, or review your map before resuming your trip. If you are still having trouble call your fleet manager or night/weekend operations and they can assist you in finding what you are looking for!  If you own a smart phone install the Google Earth app, but again ONLY use it when stopped.
  • Be mentally and emotionally sharp – Get adequate rest before you head out and never rely on caffeine or other energy drinks. Avoid heavy meals and exercise regularly to boost energy and relieve stress.  We know family and personal issues are very difficult to leave outside of your truck, but try to leave those to non-driving times. Schedule call times with your family, and should your family call while driving ask them if you can call back at a safer time. We recommend while driving to not answer calls, text or pick up a hand held device for any reason.
  • Good rules of thumb to help with self-discipline:
    • Keep devices out of reach – out of sight and out of mind keeps the distractions at bay.
    • Voicemails are there for a reason – to allow you to call someone back. Most all calls can be returned once you are parked in a safe location.
    • Turn on your device auto messaging to “I’m driving right now”.
  • Be attentive to the road ahead – Keep your eyes on the road and only make quick glances to mirrors. Do you ever see a quarterback in the middle of a play stare at the side line? Well if they do it only takes one time and that’s when a 380lb linebacker does a ground check on them!  Also, when hazards are present, such as bad weather and construction zones, slow down and leave extra distance or find a safe place to park until conditions or traffic around you improves.

We want you back home safely with your family at the end of your trip and enjoying your time with them!

Many of you have worked very hard throughout your career at this point to not have been in/involved in an accident, and at Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency, our hats are off to you because you have followed your personal rules and not allowed yourself to get distracted!

So please continue to be safe and don’t let distracted driving destroy the career you’ve worked so hard to achieve!

 

Good judgment calls and decisions will bring you many safe miles!

Steve Page

Risk Consultant

 

Media Source: [Broadbent, Alex]. (2017, July 18). Semi-Truck Plows Into A Line Of Cars [Video File]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/Dei1B1n_c6Q

Work Zone Safety

Posted April 1, 2019 by Erin

At Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency, it’s our mission to partner with you in ensuring your drivers are safe, accident-free, and avoid costly claims that can have a major impact on both your drivers and your business. Below are several great safe driving tips that we strongly encourage you to share with your drivers and incorporate into your safety training.

 

Loss Lesson: Slow Down in Work Zones

Before entering a work zone, decrease your speed, merge into the correct lane well ahead of any lane closures, and be prepared to slow down or stop suddenly.25 Speed increases perception-reaction distance, braking distance, and stopping distance.17

Did You Know? Nearly a quarter of all work-zone deaths in 2006 involved a large truck.26

Did You Know? In October 2003, a CMV driver was traveling at 60 mph in a 45 mph work zone on the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway in Illinois. The truck driver rear-ended a 25-passenger bus. The crash caused a five-vehicle pileup, killing 8 women and injuring about a dozen others. As a result of the crash, the truck driver was charged and convicted of reckless homicide and sentenced to 4 years in prison.27,28

Source: FMCSA – https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/safety/driver-safety/cmv-driving-tips-too-fast-conditions

 

 

Tips to Reduce Your Chance of a Work Zone Accident

  • Pay attention to work zone signs.
  • Leave enough space between you and the motorist in front of you.
  • Be prepared to stop or slow unexpectedly.
  • Expect to stop when you see a FLAGGER AHEAD sign.
  • If stopped or slowed in a traffic queue, consider turning on your flashers to warn traffic coming up behind you.
  • Watch for traffic and workers going into or out of the work zone.
  • Get into the open lane as soon as possible at lane closures.
  • Be aware of motorists racing to get ahead of you or trying to turn in front of you at the last second.
  • Use alternative routes to avoid work zones whenever feasible.

 

Click HERE for a complete, downloadable flyer

Source: Work Zone Safety Consortium – www.workzonesafety.org

 

 

Disclaimer:

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

 

FMCSA Grants Exemption to 30-Minute Rule for Truckers Hauling Fuel

Posted December 27, 2018 by Administrator

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA’s) hours of service (HOS) regulations dictate that if drivers can’t complete their duty within twelve hours under the 100 air-mile radius exemption that they have to take a 30-minute rest break. However, this rest break poses problems for carriers transporting hazardous materials. They can’t leave the cargo unsupervised, and attending the CMV doesn’t qualify as resting. The parking shortage also prevents drivers from finding a safe and secure area to park trucks toting hazardous material.

To address these challenges, FMCSA offered exemptions to the rule for carriers transporting specified fuels. However, propane didn’t make the initial list. This put drivers transporting petroleum-based cargo in a difficult situation. While most of them load their vehicles in the morning with the intent to finish several deliveries by the end of the day, outside circumstances can prevent this from happening.

These drivers operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) on interstate highways so traffic and accidents can impede their deliveries. Since they can’t leave their hazardous cargo to rest but they also can’t push beyond the 12-hour regulation, the National Propane Gas Association (NPGA) petitioned FMCSA for an amendment. The transportation agency granted the request, which will remain in effect through April 10, 2023.

Complying with FMCSA regulations is critical to remain in operation as a trucking company, but these rulings can create challenges for fleets. In this instance, the need to transport hazardous cargo safely took precedence and FMCSA issued an amendment. Cline Wood understands the risks involved with transporting hazardous materials. We can help your trucking company assess its risks and implement solutions to address them: get in touch at safetrucking@clinewood.com.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Improve Your CSA Score in 5 Steps

Posted December 6, 2018 by Administrator

All Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) scores are available to the public, which has a direct effect on how much business a trucking company can accrue. Customers prefer companies with better scores, plain and simple. However, having a good CSA score also means fewer roadside inspections and interventions.

While CSA scores may be a significant source of frustration for fleets and owner-operators, they do serve an important purpose. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) developed the initiative with the goal to improve roadway safety for drivers, passengers, and the motoring public at large. When a fleet or independent driver falls below acceptable standards, they run the risk of fines and interventions. Fleets that want to avoid interventions and keep their hard-earned cash should adhere to the following:

  1. Make changes starting at the top. Company leadership needs to show they are serious about improving CSA scores if they want their employees to follow suit. Taping flyers up around the office won’t cut it, either. Fleet managers need to foster a culture of safety by holding regular discussions and imbuing everything they do with safety in mind.
  2. Get employees onboard. Once management makes safety a personal priority, they need to help employees do the same. While most drivers are aware of the importance of CSA scores, they aren’t always so sure of the nuances. If they don’t understand what’s expected of them or just how serious safety violations are, they won’t be able to comply.
  3. Understand the top violations. FMCSA assigns a score to every CSA violation, meaning some are worse than others are. For example, failing to carry a valid medical certificate is a one-point violation whereas problems with lights carry a six-point penalty. Tire-related violations carry an even heavier penalty at eight points per violation. Avoiding these top point-heavy violations goes a long way toward keeping CSA scores low.
  4. Update safety procedures. Trucking companies can take a hard look at their CSA score to determine how they accumulate most of their violations. From there, they can update company policy to include those areas in drivers’ pre-trip inspections. Making pre-trip inspections mandatory is also necessary to prevent avoidable violations.
  5. Challenge citations. FMCSA doesn’t write CSA violations in stone. Carriers have two years to challenge citations. If they can get a citation dismissed, FMCSA removes the points from their CSA score. Even getting a violation’s severity reduced is worth the effort because it will mean fewer points toward the overall CSA score.

Improving CSA scores is vital to keeping a trucking company in business. Poor scores mean fewer customers, heavier fines, and more frequent interventions by the Department of Transportation (DOT). However, better CSA scores also mean improved safety, which is a top priority for any fleet. To learn more about improving your fleet’s safety, email us at safetrucking@clinewood.com.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

What You Need to Know About the Top 10 Trucking Concerns

Posted November 20, 2018 by Administrator

The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) releases a survey of the industry’s biggest concerns on an annual basis. For the past two years, the driver shortage came in as the number one concern; however, there is a much bigger insight to glean from this year’s report: the divide between commercial truck drivers and motor carriers.

How Truck Drivers Rank Issues Compared to Carriers

Out of the top ten concerns, the driver shortage lands at number nine for commercial truck drivers. For drivers, their number one concern is Hours-of-Service (HOS) regulations. This is significant because while motor carriers are focusing their efforts on acquiring more drivers, they may be overlooking issues that can cause retention problems.

To put it another way, if motor carriers want to improve the driver shortage, they need to focus on the drivers they have before casting a net for potential new hires. It always costs less money to retain employees than it does to replace them. In addition, fostering a positive work environment that values communication between drivers and carriers can attract more drivers.  Looking at what drivers list as their top concerns is a great place to start.

In order to ensure maximum driver retention, carriers need to address some of the disparities between the two lists. For example, drivers list HOS rules as their number one concern, which falls to the number three slot for carriers. The ELD mandate generated a lot of discussion, but the primary issue at the heart of the debate is the existing HOS regulations. Truck drivers are stuck between customer demands and unyielding regulations that make timely deliveries next to impossible. Carriers that want to keep drivers happy need to advocate for their concerns.

Another example highlighting the divide between driver and carrier concerns is driver distraction. It is truck drivers’ fourth most prevalent concern while it falls to the seventh slot for carriers. Truck drivers have to deal with distracted motorists on a daily basis. They’re also more likely to take the blame if an incident occurs because of skewed public perception about commercial motor vehicles (CMVs). Carriers need to take steps to protect their drivers on the road as well as implement technology to protect them in the event of an accident to ensure maximum retention.

Motor carriers and drivers have diverse needs and concerns; however, diligent carriers can find ways to bridge the gap to keep both parties happy and working harmoniously. Cline Wood knows the driver shortage is weighing heavily on trucking businesses, and we strive to find workable solutions. Contact us at safetrucking@clinewood.com to learn how we can help your trucking company.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Combat Driver Fatigue in 6 Simple Steps

Posted November 6, 2018 by Administrator

Truck driving isn’t an easy job. With difficult deadlines, limited parking, and ever-changing safety regulations, it’s easy for drivers to become stressed and exhausted. This is a recipe for fatigued driving, which reduces the driver’s ability to perform due to low energy. When drivers are groggy, they can’t react physically or mentally as they could when at maximum alertness. Fleets can use the following methods to battle driver fatigue:

  1. Get adequate sleep. A good night’s sleep is imperative for safe driving. Truck drivers need to stop driving for the day to give themselves enough time to rest to resume work the following morning. Drivers should also avoid getting behind the wheel during hours they would naturally be sleeping. In particular, truck drivers should avoid operating their vehicle between midnight and six in the morning.
  2. Take naps. If a driver begins to feel tired, he or she should take a quick nap if possible. Aim for 15-30 minutes for an optimal energy boost. Any more or less, and the nap may make the driver feel more drowsy, a condition known as sleep inertia.
  3. Avoid medication that causes drowsiness. Most people know allergy medicines can make them feel drowsy. However, a plethora of medications include warnings not to operate heavy machinery while taking them. Muscle relaxers, cold medicine, and sleeping pills are all no go’s while driving a commercial motor vehicle (CMV).
  4. Practice good diet and hydration habits. Drivers should aim to eat their meals at regular hours and intervals to ensure good quality sleep. Going to bed hungry or after gorging on fast food can result in poor rest. Proper hydration is also key to remaining alert. Keep water bottles in the cab for easy access during the day.
  5. Avoid alertness tricks. Turning up the radio or rolling down the window may provide a small initial jolt of energy, but fatigue will quickly take over again. Drinking caffeinated beverages can help, but those can prevent drivers from sleeping later or cause more drowsiness when the driver experiences the inevitable caffeine crash.
  6. Know the signs. Drowsiness can sneak up on drivers, but, if they know the signs, they can pull over and rest before causing an accident. Some of the hallmarks of drowsiness include yawning, heavy eyes, blurry vision, slower reaction times, and impatience.

Following the above tips can help drivers stay alert when operating their CMV. To learn more about improving transportation safety, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Cyber Security Awareness

Posted October 31, 2018 by Erin

Cyber Security is big news these days, and for good reason.  Many large companies have been hit by hackers, and unfortunately some trucking companies have been victims as well.  Take this scenario for example:  Your server is hacked.  The hackers send an email to one of your office workers that purportedly comes from your Chief Operating Officer, and requests a large sum of money be wired to a bank account.  This is a deviation from normal protocol, but the office worker hasn’t been trained in what red flags to look for in emails, and hasn’t been encouraged to question anything suspicious.  So unfortunately the office worker proceeds with the request and wires the money.  The scam isn’t discovered until later that month when your Bookkeeper sees the entry in your bank records.  At that point you call your IT service provider to investigate where the hack originated, if any personal and/or proprietary information was also stolen, and re-install proper security measures to prevent future hacks, but by that time the damage has been done.

Fortunately there are measures your trucking company can put in place to prevent these types of scenarios.  Click HERE to learn about 15 Best Practices to Protect Your Website from Malware & Cyberhacking.  We also encourage your company to review your insurance coverages and speak with your Producer or Account Manager regarding available coverages to help reimburse your company in the event of a loss.  Below is a chart showing types of insurance coverages that may come into play depending upon each unique cyber scenario:

Source: http://www.gccapitalideas.com/2018/07/04/chart-the-cyber-insurance-matrix-explained/

 

For more information or assistance, please contact us at safetrucking@clinewood.com.  We appreciate your safety efforts!

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

 

 

Safety Committees: A Valuable Tool for Business Success

Posted October 31, 2018 by Erin

The value of a workplace safety committee is often debated between those leaders tasked with operational assignments and those tasked with safety performance. The arguments against utilizing safety committees usually include comments related to operational inefficiencies (waste of time, slows production, etc.) or committee ineffectiveness (doesn’t accomplish anything, nothing changes, etc.).   However, when a safety committee is properly established and utilized, the financial and cultural benefits to a company far outweigh any actual or perceived negative consequences. Most companies which effectively utilize safety committees will argue that said safety committee is a vital component of the overall success of the organization.

What’s In It For My Company?

There are many advantages to establishing and utilizing a safety committee, including but not limited to:

  1. Potential reduction in Workers’ Compensation premiums (varies by state).
  2. Pursue and secure high-value contracts with more lucrative customers.
  3. Reduction in out-of-pocket expenses due to injury and illness reduction.
  4. Reduction in out-of-pocket expenses due to property damage reduction.
  5. Participation by front-line workers in identifying risks to the company.
  6. Reduction in your overall injury and illness rate (OSHA Recordable).
  7. Validation of senior leadership’s commitment to a safe workplace.
  8. Increased awareness and appreciation for the company’s safety culture; and
  9. Invaluable feedback to senior leadership to aid in decision-making.

Other Considerations

While from a federal regulatory standpoint safety committees are not required for most companies, several states do require the use of safety committees if you participate in the state Workers’ Compensation Program. However, since such requirements vary from state to state, please verify any such requirement via the agency which manages your state’s Workers’ Compensation Program.

In addition, if your company holds certain state or federal contracts you may have a regulatory requirement to establish a safety committee. You may also be required to establish a safety committee if you participate in any of the most recognizable national or international safety certification programs such as the OSHA Voluntary Protection Program, the American Chemistry Council’s Responsible Care Program, or ISO 45001.  You may also have a contractual obligation to establish a safety committee by certain customers, particularly those in highly-regulated industries such as chemical or nuclear processing, oil and gas refining, hazardous materials manufacturing, and furtherance of intermodal transportation.

Final Thoughts

All that said, the ultimate decision to establish and utilize a safety committee is first and foremost a function of senior leadership, who must be fully onboard from the outset in order to successfully develop a safety committee, grow a safety culture, and successfully reduce accidents.

Be on the lookout for future articles, where we’ll drill down into the details, including: how to establish a safety committee, selection of committee members, how to conduct a safety committee meeting, and utilization of safety committee recommendations. In the meantime if you have questions about safety committees or other safety-related topics, please contact your respective Cline Wood Risk Consultant or email us at safetrucking@clinewood.com.

 

Kenny Ray, Cline Wood Risk Consultant

 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

The Holidays are approaching fast – beware of CARGO THEFT!

Posted October 31, 2018 by Erin

While you’re making preparations for company gatherings and thinking about holiday shopping, be sure to take some time to review the processes and checks your company has in place to prevent cargo theft – because thieves are already making their plans to take their presents early.  In fact, according to a Dec., 2016 Commercial Carrier Journal article, approximately $5.8 million in cargo losses were incurred during the holiday season between 2012 and 2016.1

If you’re ever been the victim of cargo theft, you’re likely very familiar with what that terminology means.  However, the Criminal Justice Information Services Advisory Policy Board developed the following legal definition: “The criminal taking of any cargo including, but not limited to, goods, chattels, money, or baggage that constitutes, in whole or in part, a commercial shipment of freight moving in commerce, from any pipeline system, railroad car, motor truck, or other vehicle, or from any tank or storage facility, station house, platform, or depot, or from any vessel or wharf, or from any aircraft, air terminal, airport, aircraft terminal or air navigation facility, or from any intermodal container, intermodal chassis, trailer, container freight station, warehouse, freight distribution facility, or freight consolidation facility….”2

Much of this cargo theft occurs at truck stops, parking lots, and warehouses – or in other words where most commercial vehicles can be found.  There are a couple common theft scenarios.  First scenario involves a thief following a driver from the warehouse until he stops, then stealing the cargo at that location.  Second scenario involves what’s generally called “fictitious pickups”, or pickups where a thief impersonates a legitimate carrier and fraudulently secures a contract to transport cargo.  The cargo is taken in this scenario with typically no trace of the thief upon discovery of the crime.3

So what can your company do to help prevent this kind of theft?  In his Dec. 2017 webinar (which can be viewed on our Recorded Webinars page HERE), NICB Special Agent Steve Covey suggests: vetting potential business associates by way of internet checks (Safersys.org, FMCSA) and word of mouth/calling other companies; contacting local Cargo Security Councils and national associations to access the latest information and resources; and, make friends with the police before your problem happens (the police want to help you prevent theft and are happy to give their input).  Other measures that can help include high visibility lighting, secured yards, high security locks, and confirming receiving facilities holiday hours to help prevent unnecessary layovers with loaded trucks.1

For more information or assistance, please contact us at safetrucking@clinewood.com.  We appreciate your safety efforts!

1source: https://www.ccjdigital.com/cargonet-freightwatch-warn-against-holiday-season-cargo-theft/

2source: “Cargo Theft, 2016”, pg. 1, 2016 Crime in the United States, U.S. Department of Justice – Federal Bureau of Investigation – Criminal Justice Information Services Division

3source: “2014 NICB Identified Cargo Thefts: NC, SC, VA”, pg. 1-2, Data Analytics Forecast Report

 

 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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