Viewing posts categorised under: Risk Management

New Severe Winter Weather Warning to be Issued by National Weather Service

Posted November 1, 2017 by Administrator

The National Weather Service (NWS) will begin to issue a new type of snow warning this winter. Beginning in January 2018, the new warning will be specifically released in the event of a snow squall.

A snow squall is an intense snowfall event with limited duration. The snowfall itself is described as “moderate to heavy” and is accompanied by strong, gusty surface winds. Lightening sometimes accompanies a snow squall. The accumulated snow may be at a significant level.

The NWS released a statement that declared “annual highway fatalities from these events can exceed fatalities due to tornadoes.” Snow squalls contain intense snowfall rates that drop visibility and make roads slippery. The sudden change in poor weather conditions can lead to dangerous travel conditions. The short-term outpouring of snow will suddenly and severely restrict visibility and make it very difficult to safely navigate the road.

Snow squalls were the cause of a 30 vehicle pile-up on I-81 in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. There was one fatality and many serious injuries in the crash.

The Snow Squall Warning will be issued in the following conditions:

  1. A white-out situation with visibility of less than ¼ mile.
  2. Sub-freezing road temperatures that allow for a quick build-up of snowfall.
  3. Dangerous and potentially life-threatening travel conditions.

Snow squalls are very dangerous for big rigs. It’s a major cause of vehicle pile-ups. They are one of the most deadly weather events that can occur. In the past, there hasn’t been a good system for warning motorists of the hazard. This new warning system will be used to warn the public, giving them time to slow down and hopefully save lives.

The Snow Squall Warning will be issued in a similar way to Severe Thunderstorm or Severe Flooding Warnings are issued now. The alerts will be issued through the Emergency Alert System. Local regions, or “polygon-based” systems will be specified. These areas will be continually updated throughout the hazard.

The NWS will be issuing Snow Squall Warnings from the following field offices:

  • State College, Pennsylvania
  • Buffalo, New York
  • Binghamton, New York
  • Burlington, Vermont
  • Detroit
  • Pittsburgh
  • Cheyenne, Wyoming

If a Snow Squall Warning is issued in the area you are traveling, the NWS recommends that you consider avoiding or delaying your travel until the snow squall passes. If you must stay on the road, use extra caution and allow extra time. Be aware that rapid changes in visibility and slick roads may lead to accidents.

Cline Wood represents top trucking and agribusiness insurance carriers across the country. We have access to all types of insurance programs. We treat your company as if it were our own. Contact us today to find out how we can help you manage your risk, which directly contributes to your bottom line.

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FBI Warns Agricultural Industry about Increasing Cyber Risk

Posted October 11, 2017 by Administrator

In a Private Industry Notification (PIN) targeted to the agricultural industry, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Cyber Division warned the food and agriculture sector that it is increasingly becoming vulnerable to cyber attacks. As the adoption of technology and digital data increases in the farming community, cyber crime is on the rise. Smart farming practices, also known as the “Third Green Revolution” or “precision agriculture technology” has shown tremendous positive impacts on reducing the costs of farming and increasing crop yields. The report warns farmers to be aware of and understand the cyber risks associated with using modern Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and develop adequate cyber security and breach response strategies.

A Growing Threat

There is a growing threat of cyber targeting activity against the food and agriculture sector, warns the FBI. Cyber criminals are seeking to steal farm-level data in bulk. An example of how valuable this information is, government-authorized big data analytics are being used to aggregate farm-level data to track and even anticipate crop pricing and availability. Another target by cyber attackers could be to steal aggregate and/or analyzed data to exploit U.S. agriculture resources and market trends.

Other threats include:

  • Increased cyber targeting of farm-level data gathered by equipment that collects and analyzes data about soil content and past crop yields, including planting recommendations.
  • Cyber hacking of public worldwide climate and crop data used to design data visualization tools for farmers. Big data in agriculture is being used to help farmers make sustainable decisions that have an impact on food supply.
  • Susceptibility to ransomware and data destruction.
  • Drone manufacturers are focused on offering low pricing structures for farmers by using systems that are interoperable with networked devices with poor cyber security protections.

Challenges

Historically, the farming industry has lacked awareness of how to protect their data from cyber exploitation.

  • In a 2014 American Farm Bureau study of 3,400 farmers, almost half intended to invest in smart farming technologies in the next 2 years. However, 76% of the respondents expressed concerns that unauthorized individuals could hack their data and use it for commodity market speculation. Even more concerning is the finding that less than 5% of companies holding their data had a security breach response plan in place.
  • Drone manufacturers offering farmers recognize the demand for low pricing. They use interoperable data in order to keep costs low at the expense of more expensive analytics that protect against cyber attacks. Farmers have depended on drone RGB (red, green, blue) photography and thermography to monitor crop growth for the last decade. (CyberTrend, 2016.)

Recommendations

The report warns the food and agriculture industry to increase awareness of the cyber risks to farm-level data collected through precision technology and urges that farmers take the following precautionary measures:

  • Ask data management companies that store farm-level data to reveal their cyber security features and ensure adequate protections are in place.
  • Monitor employee logins, especially those that occur outside normal business hours.
  • Develop a centralized Information Technology email account that can be used to report suspicious logins, emails and other unusual activity
  • Provide ongoing training to remind and inform employees about current cyber security threats
  • Monitor outgoing data, and be ready to block unknown IP addresses
  • Monitor unusual traffic, especially from non-standard ports
  • Close unused ports
  • Create a Virtual Private Network (VPN) for remote login capability.

The FBI, in conjunction with the USDA, strongly urges members of the food and agriculture sector to refer to the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team Website for additional cyber security information and resources.

Cline Wood is here to help farmers and agricultural-related businesses protect themselves against the growing risk of cyber crime. Contact us today to learn more about how our agribusiness insurance experts can help you be prepared in today’s changing environment.

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Five Tips for Agribusinesses to Combat White Mold

Posted October 4, 2017 by Administrator

Farmers face a variety of hurdles in order to cultivate a successful crop. White mold is just one of those obstacles. This fungus thrives in cool damp environments. Foggy and brisk mornings create the perfect conditions for white mold to take root.

At first, individuals may mistake the fungus as rat droppings. It presents as firm, black, asymmetrical-shaped forms; these are sclerotia. When the environment cools and the canopy closes, the growth produces tiny mushrooms. The fungus is most likely to take hold during flowering as spores land on dead flowers and invade the plant.

How to Deal with White Mold

By the time the fungus is noticeable, the infestation is two to four weeks old. Below are several tips farmers should keep in mind when dealing with white mold.

  1. No spray can stop the mold once it has taken root. Save time and money by allowing the mold to run its course. In general, white mold does not colonize from plant to plant. It is possible, but not typical.
  2. Farmers do not need to fear for their entire farm. A field must have sclerotia present in order for the fungus to grow. However, farmers will want to take note of any infected fields, as they will always have sclerotia after an infection.
  3. Farmers should harvest infected fields last. Sclerotia lodge themselves in all areas of combine harvesters, so farmers can inadvertently contaminate other fields if they harvest from infested fields first.
  4. Once harvesting is complete, farmers should avoid tilling infected fields. Surface level sclerotia will die off faster than those buried underground will.
  5. Farmers should also stay vigilant in their weed removal. White mold can take hold in a variety of plants, including weeds, legumes, and alfalfa. For future crops, farmers should consider wheat or corn for previously infected fields, as they are more resistant to the fungus.

Dealing with mold is never a fun task, but farmers who follow the above guidelines can keep future infestations to a minimum. Farmers can also protect their venture by investing in farming insurance. As the leading provider of agribusiness insurance, Cline Wood can help farmers identify and mitigate risks to their crops and fields. To learn more, contact us today.

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Increasingly Sophisticated Weather Forecasting Technology a Boon to Trucking Industry

Posted September 26, 2017 by Administrator

Sophisticated weather forecasting technology applications help trucking fleets navigate adverse weather conditions that could pose freight delivery delays or safety risks.

New technologies provide drivers in the contintental U.S. with weather-related information to improve safety and efficiency. With these new applications, drivers can view:

  • current radar
  • precipitation on roadways
  • wind speed
  • current and extended forecasts, helping them be aware of the weather ahead.

Weather prediction resources have significantly improved since the days when the Farmers’ Almanac was the best weather forecaster source.

Rapidly improving technology has put weather forecasting and radar capabilities into the hands of those who need this information the most, which includes truck drivers. Weather technology continues to improve, current technologies are able to predict the disruptive impact of weather events and suggest actions that can be taken to mitigate the effects of the disruption.

This ability to foresee the weather and make adjustments as needed is especially useful for trucking fleets, whose daily operations can be disrupted, sometimes for days or weeks, from the effects of a hurricane, flash flood or blizzard.

According to PeopleNet, a provider of fleet management technology, weather has accounted for $3.5 billion in mobility costs and $14 billion in accident costs. Amazingly, 93% of those disasters can now be predicted using the new, cutting-edge predictive applications.

The new weather technology may be the catalyst for change for today’s competitive trucking firms, who must deal with disruptive weather events. A large-scale weather event, such as Hurricane Harvey that recently swept through the Houston, TX region, can have a disastrous effect on the transportation supply chain.

Weather is one of the biggest causes of market volatility in both the short term as well as the long term. These new technologies can help mitigate the impact such events can have throughout the supply chain. Companies are starting to use trading platforms that enable independents, fleets and third-party logistics firms to lock in rates ahead of major weather events like earthquakes.

Weather forecasting has been used to predict market price volatility for commodities since the 1980’s and is already commonly used by oil, gas and grain traders.

Enhanced notifications of road and cargo hazards can help carriers minimize losses and reduce down times. The new technology will enable drivers and equipment to maximize their potential while improving delivery efficiency during harsh weather seasons. For more on transportation safety, news, and risk, contact Cline Wood.

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Three Tips to Reduce Farming Risks

Posted September 5, 2017 by Administrator

Many individuals use the term risk when discussing farming when they really mean uncertainty. Risks are measurable; farmers can calculate and prepare for them. Uncertainties are not quantifiable which means farmers cannot gauge them. While most people do not like to dwell on the negative, farmers cannot afford to ignore risks within their operation. Below are several risks that farmers can address and mitigate straightaway.

Clear Contingency Plans

No one likes to consider his or her mortality, but it is necessary to ensure farms continue to run smoothly during adverse events. Farmers need to make sure vital employees have a backup team in place. Backup employees can be existing staff members. These substitute workers should have all necessary skills to perform the job, so farmers may need to cross train these individuals. Contingency plans are not only in place for deaths. They allow farmers to leave the farm if needed without bringing business to a halt.

Family Feuds

Farms are often a family operation, but this presents challenges. Power struggles and secrecy plague family businesses. These issues are particularly damaging during a transfer of leadership. Almost all family businesses suffer from communication problems. Some examples include authoritarianism, refusing to accept blame, and ongoing disputes. Farmers can hire consultants who specialize in family businesses to address communication issues. Bringing in a third party will help keep emotions out of business discussions.

Victims of Success

While many business owners may think there is no such thing as too much success, farmers are at an increased risk of expanding at an unsustainable rate. Before taking advantage of a growth opportunity, farmers need to analyze the costs of their current operation as well as how much money they have in reserve. Farmers need to make sure they can bear the burden of increased costs while waiting for returns. They also need to address logistical elements. For example, if a farmer purchases new land two hours away from his or her home, he or she needs to determine who will manage it.

Farmers cannot remove every threat to their operation. Some are uncontrollable, such as the environment. However, several farming risks are manageable and farmers should take steps to confront them. Cline Wood can help farmers identify risks specific to their farms and suggest methods to managing them. To learn more, contact us today.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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Hay and Straw Pose Major Fire Risks to Barns

Posted July 26, 2017 by Administrator

Most individuals look for water to put out a fire, but hay and straw are the exceptions to this rule. When hay and straw become too wet, they can increase in temperature and erupt into flames. While this is more common with hay than straw, the risk exists for both. This is because moisture causes the bacteria in hay and straw to release heat. If the bacteria dies, the bales will cool. However, if the bacteria gains a foothold, temperatures can soar over 175 degrees Fahrenheit.

How to Store Wet Bales

Farmers should store their wet bales outdoors or in a large, open area. In addition, farmers should not stack wet bales as this prevents heat and moisture from leaving. It is important to note that hay often goes through a sweat period in the initial days after baling. Temperatures can increase up to 110 degrees Fahrenheit without causing concern.

Most Common Fire Risks

Several factors influence the combustibility of hay and straw. For example, hay is most like to catch on fire during the first six weeks after baling. Other factors include:

  • Fields with wet spots
  • Moisture levels exceeding 20%
  • Bales containing more than 20% of hay preservative

How to Monitor Wet Bales

Farmers with at-risk bales of hay or straw need to keep a close watch to avoid fires. They should check the bales two times per day for the first six weeks after baling or until temperatures return to stable levels. To obtain a proper temperature reading, farmers should probe the center of the bale or at least eight feet down into oversized bales.

Determining Critical Temperatures

Below is a list of temperatures and the necessary actions farmers should take to avoid a fire.

  • <125°–No immediate action
  • 150°–This is approaching the fire hazard zone. Monitor twice per day. Farmers can take bales apart to promote airflow.
  • 160°–This is the point of a fire hazard. Farmers should check bales every two hours and take bales apart. Farmers should recruit the fire department before unstacking additional bales.
  • 175°–Bales are likely to have hot pockets at this temperature. Farmers should inform the fire department of a potential incident. Farmers can also create a tight seal on barn doors to remove oxygen.
  • 190°–Farmers need the assistance of the fire department to remove overheated bales at these temperatures. Bales may burst into flame so farmers should wet down tractors.
  • >200°–A fire is likely at this temperature. In addition to the precautions above, farmers should have fire hose lines ready to go.

While taking preventative measures is key to avoiding barn fires, they can still happen. Farmers need to invest in insurance to protect their assets in the event of a barn fire. As a leading provider of agribusiness insurance, Cline Wood can help farmers identify and manage fire risks as well as discuss their insurance needs. Contact us to learn more.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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What Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers Need to Know about Diesel Exhaust Fluid

Posted July 19, 2017 by Administrator

In 2007, semi truck and engine manufacturers began installing DEF fuel tanks in order to meet federal emissions regulations that went into effect in 2010. The new technology, called selective catalytic reduction (SCR), is an aftertreatment that is injected in small amounts into a diesel engine’s exhaust stream. DEF stands for Diesel Exhaust Fluid. The exhaust stream, which is hot, vaporizes the DEF to form ammonia and carbon dioxide, which is passed over a catalyst and converted into nitrogen and water, which is harmless.

DEF is kept in a separate reservoir tank. DEF is composed of 32.5% high-purity urea and water. Urea is a compound of organic nitrogen that is used commonly in agriculture for fertilizer.

The SCR technology not only reduces pollution, but also saves on fuel. Since the engine no longer has to be tuned to reduce the toxic NOx, it can be adjusted for better fuel economy.

The fuel tank on your truck that has the blue cap is called the DEF fuel tank. When you remove the blue cap, you will notice there is a smaller opening than what’s on the diesel fuel tank. If at all possible, when you go into the commercial card lock or the truck stop try to get bulk DEF fuel. You don’t want to have to deal with the small jugs or containers. The smaller jugs require a funnel and are not as convenient as purchasing it in bulk. Some truck stops will only carry it in the smaller containers, but if at all possible it is best to purchase in bulk.

Once full, a DEF fuel tank will last for about six fills on diesel fuel. So you don’t have to fill it every time you refuel. Just make sure you check it regularly to ensure you don’t get stuck and end up having to use the messy jug system.

There are two fuel gauges on the dash of your rig. One is for the diesel fuel and the other one is for the DEF tank. Keep an eye on your dash gauges so you don’t run into a situation where you get too low.

The biggest concern when it comes to storing DEF is the possibility of contamination. Although DEF is non-toxic, non-polluting and non-flammable, it has to be kept in a plastic container to avoid corrosion. It also has to be kept in a temperature-controlled location and out of direct sunlight. It can be kept for years when stored properly.

If you need to store DEF, here are a few tips to safeguard it from contamination.

  1. Do not refill previously used containers.
  2. Be sure to insert the DEF nozzle into the tank’s inlet to avoid contaminating the spout.
  3. Use only dedicated DEF equipment for storing and dispensing. Do not use funnels or containers that have been used for other purposes.
  4. Do NOT use tap water if you need to rinse the fueling equipment. You must use de-mineralized water.
  5. Keep DEF away from substances such as oil, grease, water, dust, fuel, dirt, metal or detergent.

Diesel engines and systems operate better using SCR technology and fleets appreciate the fuel cost savings the DEF system offers. Cline Wood represents top trucking insurance carriers across the U.S. To learn more about the issues that concern commercial truck companies today, trucking coverage and risk management, contact us.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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Webinar: Legal Implications of Electronic Logging Device Implementation and Compliance

Posted July 5, 2017 by Administrator

Join Cline Wood University and Roberts Perryman as we discuss the specifications and legal implications of electronic logging device (ELD) implementation and compliance. Subject matter expert Jason Guerra will address the impact on your trucking business. Topics include:

* The Law, Rules & Deadlines
* Compliance: Supporting Documentation and Technical Specs
* Implementation Issues & Considerations
* Exemptions Regarding Short Haul, Towing, Older Models
* Extension for Use of AOBRDs
* Avoiding Pitfalls

Date & Time: Wed, Jul 12, 2017 12:00 PM – 12:30 PM CDT

To Join: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3771330763710693123

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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Insurance Solutions for High Livestock Mortality Rates

Posted May 18, 2017 by Administrator

Raising livestock and poultry is a risky business. That is why farmers need adequate insurance to cover their animals from unexpected events. Farmers have a variety of options available to them when it comes to farm animal insurance. They can opt for customized coverage for the specific types of animals they raise or combine several different policies.

Fundamentals of Livestock Insurance

Farmers can often combine their livestock coverage into their overall farm package. This way, they can have adequate protection for their buildings, livestock, and poultry in the event of a death due to accident or injury. Some policies cover animal deaths due to illness as well, but this is specialized coverage.

Farmers can use the following methods to insure their animals:

  • Herd Coverage: This is the most basic and common coverage. Farmers use this type of insurance to cover a precise number of animals.
  • Blanket Coverage: This type of policy insures all farm property. It includes buildings, livestock, equipment, and so on.
  • Individual Coverage: This policy covers animals with higher worth. The policy explicitly states which animals are covered. The corresponding animals often have an identifying feature such as an ear tag.

Farmers can also purchase insurance unique to their livestock. Some examples include:

  • Cattle insurance
  • Pig insurance
  • Poultry insurance

Farm insurance packages often cover animals such as sheep and goats, so farmers do not need specific policies for these animals.

Farmers invest a lot of time and money into their animals. For many farmers, their livestock is their livelihood so they cannot afford to neglect insurance. To learn more about insuring livestock, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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Safe Parking for Commercial Trucks

Posted May 11, 2017 by Administrator

Truckers need and deserve safe parking. Shipping and receiving facilities are sometimes in very bad neighborhoods. When there isn’t a safe place to park, drivers may be mugged, beat up or have their equipment damaged. Between 2010 and 2014, 40 big-rig drivers were killed while working, according to the Bureau of Labor statistics. And homicides are only part of the problem. Truck cargo thefts occur at the rate of at least twice daily; 86% of those when commercial vehicles are parked in unsecured location such as public parking and truck trailer drop lots.

The issue of safe and adequate parking has been an issue for decades. The FMCSA has conducted studies on the issue. One study, “Commercial Driver Rest and Parking Requirements” was originally conducted in 1996 and was updated in 2014. The study found that there are 1700 miles of interstate highway that are not within 30 miles of a truck stop or rest area. Some drivers choose to ignore important Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association (FMCSA) hours-of-service rules so they can keep driving until a legal and safe parking spot is available. The shortage of parking suitable for commercial motor vehicles puts tired drivers in a bad position.

The FHWA has established the National Coalition on Truck Parking. So far, several major trucking organizations, such as the American Trucking Association and the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association have joined the coalition. The coalition is looking at concerns such as why $231M in parking projects across the U.S. have been submitted, but only $34M has been allocated. Most of the $34M ($20M) has been awarded to pay for intelligent transportation systems technology that alerts drivers when parking spaces are available through in-cab messaging notification systems. Some drivers advocate for cities to change zoning laws to permit additional commercial vehicle parking accessibility. Other advocates want shippers to take more responsibility and allow truckers to park in their lots when resting or waiting.

Clearly, the truck driver parking shortage remains a stubborn issue that just won’t go away. Trucker parking shortage is costing the trucking industry time, money and productivity, not to mention the risk for drivers in terms of stress, fatigue, security for their equipment and, most importantly, their personal safety.

To learn more about the issues that concern truck drivers today, trucking coverage and risk management, contact us.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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