Viewing posts categorised under: News

Grain Bin Safety Week 2019 – Fires and Explosions

Posted February 22, 2019 by Erin

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  Sparks and molten material in excess of 1000’ F can easily ignite nearby flammable materials, liquids or atmospheres resulting in a fire and/or explosion with potentially catastrophic consequences.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Follow these guidelines when hot work is performed:

  • Wear appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and/or clothing to minimize the potential for burns, trapped sparks and electric shock
  • Utilize fire watches during hot work operations
  • Don’t clean while performing hot work
  • Don’t allow machinery or equipment to be operated or grain to be dumped nearby hot work operations
  • Install a designated fire watch for 30 minutes at the completion of hot work. It’s a good practice to inspect hot work area periodically thereafter and once more before closing

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Grain Bin Safety Week 2019 – Lock Out Tag Out

Posted February 21, 2019 by Erin

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  Grain bin safety starts with maintaining grain quality in storage, which means learning and  practicing better stored-grain quality management,  while closely monitoring grain condition.  If you can prevent grain spoilage, you may be able to eliminate the leading cause of bin entry.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Before entering a bin, all mechanical, electrical,  hydraulic and pneumatic equipment, which presents a danger to workers inside grain storage structures, must be de-energized and disconnected; locked out and tagged; blocked off or otherwise prevented from operating by other equally-effective means or methods.  Discharge augers must be disconnected from power, locked out and tagged; and loading augers powered by  a Power Take-Off (PTO) must be shut off and disconnected to eliminate the possibility of someone turning on the auger while someone else is in the bin.

Whenever workers perform service or maintenance on machinery or equipment, they must isolate that equipment from all energy sources.  Workers must use an energy-isolating locking device to lockout equipment, or place a tagging device on it, according to established and documented procedures.

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

2019 Grain Bin Safety Week – Confined Space Entry

Posted February 20, 2019 by Erin

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  The OSHA Grain Handling Facilities standard/rule (29 CFR 1910.272) requires that prior to entering a grain bin, the employer either (1) issue an entry permit or (2) be present during the entire entry.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

The OSHA Grain Handling Facilities standard does apply to the following industry types:

  • Grain elevators
  • Feed and Flour Mills
  • Pelletizing Plants
  • Rice and Corn Mills
  • Soybean Flaking
  • Soy Cake Grinding

The OSHA Grain Handling Facilities standard does apply to the following types of grain storage structures:

  • Bins
  • Silos
  • Grain Tanks
  • Other Grain Storage Structures

Confined Space Entry Procedures also apply to:

  • Pits
  • Tanks
  • Vessels
  • Hoppers
  • Vaults

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

2019 Grain Bin Safety Week – Entrapment and Engulfment

Posted February 19, 2019 by Erin

 

 

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  These hazards include: fires and explosions from grain dust accumulation, suffocation from engulfment and entrapment in grain bins, falls from heights and crushing injuries and amputations from grain handling equipment.  According to researchers at Purdue University, more than 900 cases of grain engulfment have been reported with a fatality rate of 62% in the past 50 years. In 2010, at least 26 U.S. workers were killed in grain engulfment accidents − the highest number on record.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Storage and handling of grain creates unique hazards.  Potential hazards include engulfment and entrapment, injury from falls, and respiratory and breathing problems from inhalation of dust, molds and allergens.  Be aware of these entrapment and engulfment hazards when working around grain bins:

  • Flowing grain – Grain is flowing when a bin is being unloaded from the bin. Flowing grain can act like quicksand, pulling a person into the grain and entrapping them in a matter of seconds. Suffocation and death is often the result.
  • Bridged grain – Bridged grain occurs when the top layer crusts over a void making the bin appear full. It may look safe, but walking on the bridge may cause it to collapse, engulfing you. Break up the crusted grain from outside the bin with a long pole.
  • Columned grain – Columned grain occurs when grain is stuck to the side walls of a bin, creating very steep slopes. Avalanching can occur, engulfing anyone near the base of the column. Break up the crusted grain from outside the bin with a long pole.
  • Due to the dangers associated with grain bins, youth working on farms and agribusinesses should NEVER enter a grain bin.
  • Engulfment in grain bins can result in multiple fatalities when others attempt to rescue and become victims as well.  Rescues should only be attempted by properly trained and equipped professionals.

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

2019 Grain Bin Safety Week – Safely Entering a Grain Bin

Posted February 19, 2019 by Erin

 

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  Grain bin entry is extremely dangerous and exposes farmers and commercial grain handlers to serious hazards.  Suffocation can occur when  workers are engulfed by grain or when bins develop oxygen-deficient atmospheres.  To add to the tragedy, when other workers or family members attempt to  rescue a person in distress, they too can fall victim.  Although bin entry should always be a last resort to accomplish a task, there are times when workers must  enter a grain bin.  To help  ensure worker safety, all farmers and commercial grain handlers should strictly follow OSHA’s grain-handling standard and requirements for entering a bin, including developing and implementing a written  bin entry program.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Before any bin-entry activities can occur, OSHA  requires workers to be trained for the specific hazardous work operations they are to perform.  Workers need to understand the hazards, equipment shut-down and  lock-out procedures, air testing and how to properly  tie off when entering above grain that can engulf.  When a worker enters a grain bin from a level at or above the level of the stored grain, or whenever a worker stands on or in stored grain, the worker must use a harness and safety line that’s securely tied to a fixed, overhead-anchor point.  A lifeline attached to any location other than an overhead-anchor point is useless in preventing engulfment and may only serve as a means to locating a body.

Workers should be reminded to never walk down  grain — a practice strictly prohibited under OSHA’s  grain handling standard.  Walking down grain is when a worker walks on top of grain, while equipment is running, in an effort to make it flow.

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp and 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

FMCSA Grants Exemption to 30-Minute Rule for Truckers Hauling Fuel

Posted December 27, 2018 by Administrator

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA’s) hours of service (HOS) regulations dictate that if drivers can’t complete their duty within twelve hours under the 100 air-mile radius exemption that they have to take a 30-minute rest break. However, this rest break poses problems for carriers transporting hazardous materials. They can’t leave the cargo unsupervised, and attending the CMV doesn’t qualify as resting. The parking shortage also prevents drivers from finding a safe and secure area to park trucks toting hazardous material.

To address these challenges, FMCSA offered exemptions to the rule for carriers transporting specified fuels. However, propane didn’t make the initial list. This put drivers transporting petroleum-based cargo in a difficult situation. While most of them load their vehicles in the morning with the intent to finish several deliveries by the end of the day, outside circumstances can prevent this from happening.

These drivers operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) on interstate highways so traffic and accidents can impede their deliveries. Since they can’t leave their hazardous cargo to rest but they also can’t push beyond the 12-hour regulation, the National Propane Gas Association (NPGA) petitioned FMCSA for an amendment. The transportation agency granted the request, which will remain in effect through April 10, 2023.

Complying with FMCSA regulations is critical to remain in operation as a trucking company, but these rulings can create challenges for fleets. In this instance, the need to transport hazardous cargo safely took precedence and FMCSA issued an amendment. Cline Wood understands the risks involved with transporting hazardous materials. We can help your trucking company assess its risks and implement solutions to address them: get in touch at safetrucking@clinewood.com.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Veterans Day – Honoring All Who Served

Posted November 12, 2018 by Erin

Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC company, wants to be the first to thank our many Military men and women for their years of Military Service.  We are blessed to have many clients and associates as members of our family that have served in the military, are currently serving in the military, or have a close family member serving in the military.

We also want to recognize the family members who held the home front down while each of these men and women were away serving our country.

Without all their efforts we as Americans would not have the Freedom we have today!

Sunday, November 11, 2018 is Veterans Day – and also observed November 12, 2018.

We truly hope everyone shows you and all your family members the appreciation you deserve for our freedom, not only on this day but for the rest of your life.

Again, THANK YOU for our freedom, and for being part of our Cline Wood Marsh & McLennan Agency Family.

 

 

Cline Wood expands Risk Management Team with addition of two experienced safety professionals

Posted September 21, 2018 by Erin

CLINE WOOD EXPANDS RISK MANAGEMENT TEAM WITH ADDITION OF TWO EXPERIENCED SAFETY PROFESSIONALS

Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC company, has hired two new risk consultants to help its transportation and agribusiness clients build and enhance their safety cultures and design and implement various industry-specific risk management solutions.

Steve Page has spent over 30 years as a leader in transportation and safety management. His previous leadership positions within several realms of the trucking industry included roles focusing on safety and safety programs, compliance, FMCSR rules and regulations, and driver management/coaching. He earned the NATMI Certified Director of Safety designation in 2003 and many other awards and acknowledgments because of his work in transportation safety. Steve will primarily work with employers in the Midwest region.

Kenny Ray has spent over 30 years building a successful career in safety, security and risk management. His experience includes 25 years as a peace officer in Texas and many years with the Texas Department of Public Safety and Texas Rangers in various leadership positions. These combined with his most recent role as a transportation safety director have positioned him well to support Cline Wood clients in Texas and the Southwest.

“We are committed to helping our clients build a safety culture that helps control losses and increase the value of their companies,” said Mike Wood, president of Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC company. “Our team is made up of proven professionals who have met the challenges in the industries we represent and they will work with our clients to find solutions to those challenges. We are extremely pleased to have both Steve and Kenny join us, as they embark on a new stage of their careers.”

 

Please contact our Safety & Risk Management team with any questions at safetrucking@clinewood.com.

 

HOS House Bill Proposes to Alter Regulations for Livestock and Agriculture Haulers

Posted July 2, 2018 by Administrator

There have been a series of bills proposed this year that target Hours of Service (HOS) reforms in response to the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) mandate that went into effect in December 2017. The latest bill, filed in the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday, June 21, 2018, aims to reform the regulations for livestock/agriculture haulers. The bill would also allow the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to move faster on any rulemaking that would provide drivers with split sleeper berth flexibility. The new rule would make it faster and easier for drivers to maintain records under the ELD mandate.

The new bill, called The Honest Operators Undertake Road Safety Act (H.R. 6178), was introduced by Representatives Sanford Bishop (D-Georgia), Rick Crawford (R-Arkansas) and Bruce Westerman (R-Arkansas). The bill is the first to be backed by the American Trucking Association (ATA) this year. The ATA announced its support for the legislation on Thursday.

The bill targets the livestock and agriculture hauling sector specifically, like other HOS reform bills filed recently. This bill provides relatively small reforms, instead of a complete overhaul of the HOS rules and regulations. The HOURS act would provide exemptions to truck drivers that are hauling livestock and agriculture commodities, allowing them to be exempt from HOS limits and duty status records. The bill, if passed, would apply year-round as long as the driver is within a 150 air-mile radius of the source of the livestock or agriculture product. Some of the other bills have included time-limitations during state-designated planting and harvesting seasons.

A big part of the HOURS Act is the reduction in supporting documents drivers would be required to maintain. Current regulations require drivers to keep at least eight supporting documents on hand for the previous 24-hour work period. HOS supporting documents include:

  • Fuel receipts
  • Bills of lading
  • Dispatch records.

The new regulation, if passed, would allow drivers to legally maintain only two documents per day, one verifying their start time and the other the end of their workday. The bill would also allow FMCSA to permit more flexible split sleeper options, such as 5-5, 6-4 and 7-3. Current regulations dictate a strict split sleeper berth time to 8 and 2 hours, for the required 10 hour off-duty period every 24 hours.

If FMCSA does propose a rule to alter split sleeper times, the HOURS Act would allow the agency to skip the required process of rulemaking and move directly to rule proposal and accepting public comments.

The HOURS Act would directly impact short-haul as well as long-haul drivers. A short-haul driver is defined as someone who operates within 150 air-miles of their work reporting location. Under the proposed bill, short-haul drivers would be exempt from HOS regs and the ELD mandate if they complete their work day within 14 hours. Current regulations allow this only for non-CDL drivers operating under the short-haul exemption.

To learn more about transportation industry news, trucking coverage and risk management, contact Cline Wood here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How the Denham Amendment Could Impact the Trucking Industry If Passed

Posted June 11, 2018 by Administrator

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reauthorization bill that passed in the House in late April 2018 could have serious implications for the trucking industry if it passes the Senate as well.

The so-called “Denham” bill, named after it’s sponsor Representative Jeff Denham, has had mixed reactions from the trucking industry. Some organizations, such as the American Trucking Association (ATA) believes the amendment will help streamline interstate commerce by providing a federal standard for hour-of-service (HOS) rules. But other industry groups believe the amendment will rob truck drivers of needed rest and rightful compensation.

The amendment was originally a part of the FAST ACT passed by congress in December, but this amendment didn’t make the cut, so that’s why it’s been tacked on to the FAA bill.

Here is a breakdown of how the amendment could impact the industry.

The amendment seeks to pre-empt state laws related to rest breaks. It would require all truck drivers to abide by the Department of Transportation (DOT) hours-of-service regulations first.

  • The amendment would allow drivers to follow the federal guidelines for taking breaks, which are not as stringent as some states, such as California. California requires a 10-minute rest break for every two-hours worked and a 30-minute meal break every five hours worked. The federal guidelines require drivers to take a 30-minute break every 8 hours, which is now enforced by electronic logging devices (ELDs).
  • The amendment also prevents drivers from being paid for the breaks they take (California pays drivers for their breaks).
  • Drivers can still take breaks, but they would lose money by doing so.

The ATA wants a unified system that is seamless in order to facilitate interstate commerce. However, drivers’ rights and general wellbeing may be impacted if the amendment passes.

  • The amendment would permit drivers to disregard state HOS regulations, which might speed up shipment times.
  • However, the amendment could deter drivers from taking needed breaks in the interest of a reduction in compensation, which could lead to an increase in accidents, injuries, property damage and even death due to driver-fatigue.
  • The amendment would impact drivers’ wages because trucking companies would no longer be required to meet state wage requirements; they would only have to meet the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

This amendment could have a serious impact on the trucking industry.

  • Drivers may struggle to get better pay, which is especially critical as the truck driver turnover rate is approaching 100 percent.
  • Interstate commerce would be streamlined, but drivers may experience ELD implementation issues or become dissatisfied and leave the industry.
  • Drivers may not get the rest they need, which could exacerbate the sleep apnea problem in the industry as well as contribute to the high rate of commercial truck crashes.

Shippers may also be impacted. On one hand, the amendment would allow a more streamlined system for interstate commerce, which could allow shippers to get shipments out faster. On the other hand, if the amendment creates more issues for drivers and further increases the turnover rate, it could cause rates to increase. The Denham amendment has yet to pass the Senate, so the impact of the potential bill remains to be seen.

To learn more transportation industry news, trucking coverage and risk management, contact us here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Copyright © 2019 Cline Wood.