Viewing posts categorised under: Featured

Grain Bin Safety Week 2019 – Fires and Explosions

Posted February 22, 2019 by Erin

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  Sparks and molten material in excess of 1000’ F can easily ignite nearby flammable materials, liquids or atmospheres resulting in a fire and/or explosion with potentially catastrophic consequences.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Follow these guidelines when hot work is performed:

  • Wear appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and/or clothing to minimize the potential for burns, trapped sparks and electric shock
  • Utilize fire watches during hot work operations
  • Don’t clean while performing hot work
  • Don’t allow machinery or equipment to be operated or grain to be dumped nearby hot work operations
  • Install a designated fire watch for 30 minutes at the completion of hot work. It’s a good practice to inspect hot work area periodically thereafter and once more before closing

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Grain Bin Safety Week 2019 – Lock Out Tag Out

Posted February 21, 2019 by Erin

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  Grain bin safety starts with maintaining grain quality in storage, which means learning and  practicing better stored-grain quality management,  while closely monitoring grain condition.  If you can prevent grain spoilage, you may be able to eliminate the leading cause of bin entry.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Before entering a bin, all mechanical, electrical,  hydraulic and pneumatic equipment, which presents a danger to workers inside grain storage structures, must be de-energized and disconnected; locked out and tagged; blocked off or otherwise prevented from operating by other equally-effective means or methods.  Discharge augers must be disconnected from power, locked out and tagged; and loading augers powered by  a Power Take-Off (PTO) must be shut off and disconnected to eliminate the possibility of someone turning on the auger while someone else is in the bin.

Whenever workers perform service or maintenance on machinery or equipment, they must isolate that equipment from all energy sources.  Workers must use an energy-isolating locking device to lockout equipment, or place a tagging device on it, according to established and documented procedures.

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

2019 Grain Bin Safety Week – Confined Space Entry

Posted February 20, 2019 by Erin

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  The OSHA Grain Handling Facilities standard/rule (29 CFR 1910.272) requires that prior to entering a grain bin, the employer either (1) issue an entry permit or (2) be present during the entire entry.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

The OSHA Grain Handling Facilities standard does apply to the following industry types:

  • Grain elevators
  • Feed and Flour Mills
  • Pelletizing Plants
  • Rice and Corn Mills
  • Soybean Flaking
  • Soy Cake Grinding

The OSHA Grain Handling Facilities standard does apply to the following types of grain storage structures:

  • Bins
  • Silos
  • Grain Tanks
  • Other Grain Storage Structures

Confined Space Entry Procedures also apply to:

  • Pits
  • Tanks
  • Vessels
  • Hoppers
  • Vaults

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

2019 Grain Bin Safety Week – Entrapment and Engulfment

Posted February 19, 2019 by Erin

 

 

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  These hazards include: fires and explosions from grain dust accumulation, suffocation from engulfment and entrapment in grain bins, falls from heights and crushing injuries and amputations from grain handling equipment.  According to researchers at Purdue University, more than 900 cases of grain engulfment have been reported with a fatality rate of 62% in the past 50 years. In 2010, at least 26 U.S. workers were killed in grain engulfment accidents − the highest number on record.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Storage and handling of grain creates unique hazards.  Potential hazards include engulfment and entrapment, injury from falls, and respiratory and breathing problems from inhalation of dust, molds and allergens.  Be aware of these entrapment and engulfment hazards when working around grain bins:

  • Flowing grain – Grain is flowing when a bin is being unloaded from the bin. Flowing grain can act like quicksand, pulling a person into the grain and entrapping them in a matter of seconds. Suffocation and death is often the result.
  • Bridged grain – Bridged grain occurs when the top layer crusts over a void making the bin appear full. It may look safe, but walking on the bridge may cause it to collapse, engulfing you. Break up the crusted grain from outside the bin with a long pole.
  • Columned grain – Columned grain occurs when grain is stuck to the side walls of a bin, creating very steep slopes. Avalanching can occur, engulfing anyone near the base of the column. Break up the crusted grain from outside the bin with a long pole.
  • Due to the dangers associated with grain bins, youth working on farms and agribusinesses should NEVER enter a grain bin.
  • Engulfment in grain bins can result in multiple fatalities when others attempt to rescue and become victims as well.  Rescues should only be attempted by properly trained and equipped professionals.

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

2019 Grain Bin Safety Week – Safely Entering a Grain Bin

Posted February 19, 2019 by Erin

 

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  Grain bin entry is extremely dangerous and exposes farmers and commercial grain handlers to serious hazards.  Suffocation can occur when  workers are engulfed by grain or when bins develop oxygen-deficient atmospheres.  To add to the tragedy, when other workers or family members attempt to  rescue a person in distress, they too can fall victim.  Although bin entry should always be a last resort to accomplish a task, there are times when workers must  enter a grain bin.  To help  ensure worker safety, all farmers and commercial grain handlers should strictly follow OSHA’s grain-handling standard and requirements for entering a bin, including developing and implementing a written  bin entry program.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Before any bin-entry activities can occur, OSHA  requires workers to be trained for the specific hazardous work operations they are to perform.  Workers need to understand the hazards, equipment shut-down and  lock-out procedures, air testing and how to properly  tie off when entering above grain that can engulf.  When a worker enters a grain bin from a level at or above the level of the stored grain, or whenever a worker stands on or in stored grain, the worker must use a harness and safety line that’s securely tied to a fixed, overhead-anchor point.  A lifeline attached to any location other than an overhead-anchor point is useless in preventing engulfment and may only serve as a means to locating a body.

Workers should be reminded to never walk down  grain — a practice strictly prohibited under OSHA’s  grain handling standard.  Walking down grain is when a worker walks on top of grain, while equipment is running, in an effort to make it flow.

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp and 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

FMCSA Grants Exemption to 30-Minute Rule for Truckers Hauling Fuel

Posted December 27, 2018 by Administrator

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA’s) hours of service (HOS) regulations dictate that if drivers can’t complete their duty within twelve hours under the 100 air-mile radius exemption that they have to take a 30-minute rest break. However, this rest break poses problems for carriers transporting hazardous materials. They can’t leave the cargo unsupervised, and attending the CMV doesn’t qualify as resting. The parking shortage also prevents drivers from finding a safe and secure area to park trucks toting hazardous material.

To address these challenges, FMCSA offered exemptions to the rule for carriers transporting specified fuels. However, propane didn’t make the initial list. This put drivers transporting petroleum-based cargo in a difficult situation. While most of them load their vehicles in the morning with the intent to finish several deliveries by the end of the day, outside circumstances can prevent this from happening.

These drivers operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) on interstate highways so traffic and accidents can impede their deliveries. Since they can’t leave their hazardous cargo to rest but they also can’t push beyond the 12-hour regulation, the National Propane Gas Association (NPGA) petitioned FMCSA for an amendment. The transportation agency granted the request, which will remain in effect through April 10, 2023.

Complying with FMCSA regulations is critical to remain in operation as a trucking company, but these rulings can create challenges for fleets. In this instance, the need to transport hazardous cargo safely took precedence and FMCSA issued an amendment. Cline Wood understands the risks involved with transporting hazardous materials. We can help your trucking company assess its risks and implement solutions to address them: get in touch at safetrucking@clinewood.com.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Improve Your CSA Score in 5 Steps

Posted December 6, 2018 by Administrator

All Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) scores are available to the public, which has a direct effect on how much business a trucking company can accrue. Customers prefer companies with better scores, plain and simple. However, having a good CSA score also means fewer roadside inspections and interventions.

While CSA scores may be a significant source of frustration for fleets and owner-operators, they do serve an important purpose. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) developed the initiative with the goal to improve roadway safety for drivers, passengers, and the motoring public at large. When a fleet or independent driver falls below acceptable standards, they run the risk of fines and interventions. Fleets that want to avoid interventions and keep their hard-earned cash should adhere to the following:

  1. Make changes starting at the top. Company leadership needs to show they are serious about improving CSA scores if they want their employees to follow suit. Taping flyers up around the office won’t cut it, either. Fleet managers need to foster a culture of safety by holding regular discussions and imbuing everything they do with safety in mind.
  2. Get employees onboard. Once management makes safety a personal priority, they need to help employees do the same. While most drivers are aware of the importance of CSA scores, they aren’t always so sure of the nuances. If they don’t understand what’s expected of them or just how serious safety violations are, they won’t be able to comply.
  3. Understand the top violations. FMCSA assigns a score to every CSA violation, meaning some are worse than others are. For example, failing to carry a valid medical certificate is a one-point violation whereas problems with lights carry a six-point penalty. Tire-related violations carry an even heavier penalty at eight points per violation. Avoiding these top point-heavy violations goes a long way toward keeping CSA scores low.
  4. Update safety procedures. Trucking companies can take a hard look at their CSA score to determine how they accumulate most of their violations. From there, they can update company policy to include those areas in drivers’ pre-trip inspections. Making pre-trip inspections mandatory is also necessary to prevent avoidable violations.
  5. Challenge citations. FMCSA doesn’t write CSA violations in stone. Carriers have two years to challenge citations. If they can get a citation dismissed, FMCSA removes the points from their CSA score. Even getting a violation’s severity reduced is worth the effort because it will mean fewer points toward the overall CSA score.

Improving CSA scores is vital to keeping a trucking company in business. Poor scores mean fewer customers, heavier fines, and more frequent interventions by the Department of Transportation (DOT). However, better CSA scores also mean improved safety, which is a top priority for any fleet. To learn more about improving your fleet’s safety, email us at safetrucking@clinewood.com.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

8 Financial Factors Farmers Need to Consider for 2019

Posted November 29, 2018 by Administrator

Farming has always been a risky occupation with slim margins, and 2019 will be no exception. Both livestock and crop farmers are feeling the financial squeeze, dairy farming and row-crop sectors in particular. Thankfully, not every trend is bleak. The following are several developments farmers need to be aware of to maximize their profits.

Positive Factors Affecting Farming Finances

There are several positive trends affecting the farming industry. These include:

  • Unemployment is the lowest it’s been in over five decades, coming in at 3.7%. Many agribusiness employees are also seeing an increase in salary.
  • Experts expect consumer spending to remain stable as farmers continue to produce strong yields.
  • Farmers have new opportunities at growth due to an increased interest in fresh foods, craft beer, and other ventures that call for specialty crops.
  • Farmland value is stable with some small increases. This is significant for farmers who borrowed against their equity.

Negative Factors Affecting Farming Finances

While there are several notable trends to look forward to, farmers need to be aware of the negative aspects poised to influence the industry as well.

  • Yields may be strong, but prices are not. In addition, just because a farmer can produce more doesn’t mean he or she has enough space to store it before selling it. It may behoove farmers to produce slightly less to keep production costs down.
  • Experts expect the cost for crop production to increase in 2019.
  • A decrease in crop profitability isn’t correlating to a decrease in rent. A visceral desire to control land can make rent negotiations tough, especially when there are other farmers willing to pay steep rent costs.
  • While stable farmland prices is a good thing for established farmers, it’s a challenge for those trying to get their foot in the door. Farmland value remains high, placing it out of reach for up and coming farmers.

Running a successful farming operation requires balancing risk against profit. For example, overreaching or poor planning can turn a successful yield into a financial disaster. Farmers who take the time to learn and plan for the above trends can navigate around the negative while capitalizing on the positive. To learn more about reducing your farming risk, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

What You Need to Know About the Top 10 Trucking Concerns

Posted November 20, 2018 by Administrator

The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) releases a survey of the industry’s biggest concerns on an annual basis. For the past two years, the driver shortage came in as the number one concern; however, there is a much bigger insight to glean from this year’s report: the divide between commercial truck drivers and motor carriers.

How Truck Drivers Rank Issues Compared to Carriers

Out of the top ten concerns, the driver shortage lands at number nine for commercial truck drivers. For drivers, their number one concern is Hours-of-Service (HOS) regulations. This is significant because while motor carriers are focusing their efforts on acquiring more drivers, they may be overlooking issues that can cause retention problems.

To put it another way, if motor carriers want to improve the driver shortage, they need to focus on the drivers they have before casting a net for potential new hires. It always costs less money to retain employees than it does to replace them. In addition, fostering a positive work environment that values communication between drivers and carriers can attract more drivers.  Looking at what drivers list as their top concerns is a great place to start.

In order to ensure maximum driver retention, carriers need to address some of the disparities between the two lists. For example, drivers list HOS rules as their number one concern, which falls to the number three slot for carriers. The ELD mandate generated a lot of discussion, but the primary issue at the heart of the debate is the existing HOS regulations. Truck drivers are stuck between customer demands and unyielding regulations that make timely deliveries next to impossible. Carriers that want to keep drivers happy need to advocate for their concerns.

Another example highlighting the divide between driver and carrier concerns is driver distraction. It is truck drivers’ fourth most prevalent concern while it falls to the seventh slot for carriers. Truck drivers have to deal with distracted motorists on a daily basis. They’re also more likely to take the blame if an incident occurs because of skewed public perception about commercial motor vehicles (CMVs). Carriers need to take steps to protect their drivers on the road as well as implement technology to protect them in the event of an accident to ensure maximum retention.

Motor carriers and drivers have diverse needs and concerns; however, diligent carriers can find ways to bridge the gap to keep both parties happy and working harmoniously. Cline Wood knows the driver shortage is weighing heavily on trucking businesses, and we strive to find workable solutions. Contact us at safetrucking@clinewood.com to learn how we can help your trucking company.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Cyber Security Awareness

Posted October 31, 2018 by Erin

Cyber Security is big news these days, and for good reason.  Many large companies have been hit by hackers, and unfortunately some trucking companies have been victims as well.  Take this scenario for example:  Your server is hacked.  The hackers send an email to one of your office workers that purportedly comes from your Chief Operating Officer, and requests a large sum of money be wired to a bank account.  This is a deviation from normal protocol, but the office worker hasn’t been trained in what red flags to look for in emails, and hasn’t been encouraged to question anything suspicious.  So unfortunately the office worker proceeds with the request and wires the money.  The scam isn’t discovered until later that month when your Bookkeeper sees the entry in your bank records.  At that point you call your IT service provider to investigate where the hack originated, if any personal and/or proprietary information was also stolen, and re-install proper security measures to prevent future hacks, but by that time the damage has been done.

Fortunately there are measures your trucking company can put in place to prevent these types of scenarios.  Click HERE to learn about 15 Best Practices to Protect Your Website from Malware & Cyberhacking.  We also encourage your company to review your insurance coverages and speak with your Producer or Account Manager regarding available coverages to help reimburse your company in the event of a loss.  Below is a chart showing types of insurance coverages that may come into play depending upon each unique cyber scenario:

Source: http://www.gccapitalideas.com/2018/07/04/chart-the-cyber-insurance-matrix-explained/

 

For more information or assistance, please contact us at safetrucking@clinewood.com.  We appreciate your safety efforts!

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

 

 

Copyright © 2019 Cline Wood.