Viewing posts categorised under: Farm Safety

How to Reduce the Likelihood of Sexual Harassment in Agribusiness

Posted June 13, 2018 by Administrator

Sexual harassment isn’t an issue that is unique to farming. However, the conditions common to farming present a significant number of opportunities and the victims often lack resources to make it stop. A significant portion of the problem occurs when farmers contract out their labor rather than hiring their workers directly. These farmhands are often unfamiliar with harassment laws or don’t know their rights. They also fear retaliation for speaking out so they remain silent.

How to Recognize Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment isn’t always overt, as it can be verbal as well physical. It can occur before, during, or after working hours when a supervisor or co-worker makes unwelcome advances while operating within the scope of employment. Examples of sexual harassment include:

  • Unwanted sexual commentary, jokes, written notes, or derogatory remarks of a sexual nature
  • Unwanted and intentional touching of a sexual nature or on an intimate area of the body
  • Wielding a position of authority to extort sexual favors in exchange for a promotion or preferential treatment

Any sexual action that creates a hostile work environment opens an employer up to a sexual harassment lawsuit.

Employers’ and Supervisors’ Obligations to Farm Workers

Any authority figure on the farm needs to take pains to avoid committing harassing behaviors as well as identify and correct inappropriate employee conduct. Supervisors who fail to put a stop to sexual harassment can be held liable in a lawsuit for tolerating offensive behavior. As such, all farming operations need to have a complaint procedure that allows victims to report harassment without fear of retribution. Employers should also include at least one female employee as a complaint receiver as many female victims don’t feel comfortable reporting to a male.

Farms should also implement clear disciplinary guidelines for sexual harassment claims. By following procedures every time, employers can eliminate the perception of discrimination or preferential treatment. Employers should also follow up on any reports of harassment to ensure it actually stops. When cases of employee sexual harassment make it to the courtroom, judges consider if the employer learned about the problem as soon as possible, how the employer addressed it, and what steps the employer took to prevent it in the future.

Protecting Employees and the Farm

Farming operations accused of creating a hostile work environment due to sexual harassment can find themselves at the center of an expensive lawsuit. Farms often operate on tight budgets, and a lawsuit can be enough to shut it down permanently. While taking steps to prevent sexual harassment in the first place is key, farmers can also invest in insurance to protect themselves and their agribusiness. Contact Cline Wood to learn more.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

5 Serious Risks for Poultry Farms

Posted May 28, 2018 by Administrator

There are several risks involved with poultry farming. However, infection disease is the biggest and most concerning. That is why poultry farmers need to practice good biosecurity to reduce incidents of disease. The following are the most common sources of disease in poultry farming.

  1. The stock itself. The fowls can carry and transmit disease, dead birds in particular. Poultry farmers need to be careful when disposing of deceased animals to prevent the spread of infectious disease. Farmers should also take care when moving poultry stock from one area of the farm to another as this represents another opportunity for the spread of disease.
  2. Vehicles and farming equipment. Famers can unwittingly spread contagions by transporting and using contaminated equipment. For example, if a farmer transported dead birds in a wagon and then loaded that same wagon with feed later, disease may infiltrate the feed.
  3. The animals’ feed. Continuing with the above, feed can transfer disease in several ways. In addition to transporting feed in a contaminated vehicle, rodents can infiltrate it and leave behind disease. Farmers should take great care when transporting and storing their feed to prevent infection.
  4. People on the farm. Farmers may think only visitors pose a risk for spreading disease, but this is not the case. Any workers or individuals who live on the farm are also a threat. Anyone can transfer disease from their shoes as they come and go on the farm.
  5. Water. This is the main source for the spread of disease. Any feces that make it into the water can contaminate it and infect animals across the farm.

Farmers can take several steps to prevent the spread of disease. Implementing common sense biosecurity measures such as not allowing vehicles into the production area, situating production areas far from water sources, treating all drinking water before allowing animals to ingest it, and utilizing freezers for managing the disposal of dead poultry. There is no one simple method for preventing disease on poultry farms, but following the above practices can help. Contact the experts at Cline Wood to learn more about reducing risk on your poultry farm.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Four Critical Skills for Running a Successful Agribusiness

Posted April 17, 2018 by Administrator

In previous decades, farmers only needed to know how to grow and sustain crops to be successful. Now, the ability to produce a product is a given in farming. With improved technology and communication, almost anyone can grow crops with a modicum of success. Standing out above the competition, however, takes much more work. Farmers now must possess growing power and business savvy to differentiate and remain relevant.

Business Skills and Leadership in Farming

Bringing business skills into the farming industry increases the complexity but also the rewards. Farmers can no longer only rely on their skills at cultivating crops. The following are just some of the areas farmers must learn to navigate to keep ahead of rival operations:

  1. Innovative finance administration
  2. Consumer research and marketing
  3. How to apply and use agricultural technology
  4. Risk management strategies

Risk management, in particular, is a multi-layered concept. Farmers must consider how to avoid risks as well as deal with them should they occur. For example, farmers can take several measures to prevent fires; however, failing to establish a system to manage the aftermath of a fire is foolhardy. Even with the best preventative measures in place, accidents can happen. That is why farmers need to incorporate a number of insurance policies to protect their farm. Failing to invest in insurance coverage can bankrupt a farmer and destroy his or her operation.

The time has come and gone where successful farmers only needed to be good at production. Farmers that fail to improve their business expertise will find themselves falling behind those that invest in marketing, technology, and more to protect their assets. Cline Wood can help struggling farmers navigate the changing landscape of the agriculture industry while putting safeguards in place to protect their farm. Contact us today to learn more.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Four Categories of Critical Agribusiness Risk

Posted March 12, 2018 by Administrator

Farmers and farmhands expose themselves to several risks on a regular basis. Some of the top threats include heat-related illnesses, vehicle hazards, fall hazards, and more. By familiarizing themselves with these risks, farmers and their workers can ward off injuries.

Heat Risks

Heat illnesses can prove lethal; however, they are 100% avoidable. Many farms are hot and humid, which puts workers at risk for heat exposure. Heavy lifting or wearing heavy protective gear can compound this risk so it is important that workers take the proper precautions to protect themselves from heat illnesses. Farmers and workers need to ensure they stay hydrated and rest often in the shade. Dehydration happens faster than many realize, so workers should try to drink water every 15 minutes even if they do not feel thirsty.

Vehicle Hazards

Vehicle injuries account for a significant portion of farming accidents every year. Farm tractors, harvesters, and ATVs all cause accidents on farms. Rollovers are one of the most lethal farming accidents. Equipping vehicles with roll bars or roll cages whenever possible can help save lives. Other safety measures include wearing a seatbelt, prohibiting passengers from riding in farming equipment, and only operating vehicles on the appropriate terrain (e.g. do not operate ATVs on streets or paved roads).

Fall Hazards

Fall hazards are not unique to farming. However, compared to other industries, farming experiences a much higher rate of fall-related injuries. To mitigate this risk, farmers need to take three steps. Identify fall hazards, assess the likelihood of an injury occurring from each hazard, and implement control measures to eliminate or minimize the risks. Examples of control measures include eliminating the risk, substituting the risk with a less hazardous option, isolating the risk to minimize the number of employees that must interact with it, utilizing personal protective equipment (PPE) to minimize the effects of the risk, and more.

Grain Bins and Silos

Compared to the above, grain bins and silos may not seem so threatening. However, these structures can combust, cause engulfment, or dust exposure. Of those three, engulfment is most likely to prove lethal. Moving grain acts like quicksand and can engulf workers, sometimes resulting in suffocation. Establishing procedures such as never walking across moving grain can eliminate this threat.

Farmers and workers that familiarize themselves with common hazards can take steps to reduce the likelihood of those risks occurring. Cline Wood can help farmers identify the risks that are unique to their operation as well as what steps to take to mitigate them. To learn more about farming safety, contact us today.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Join Us for Grain Bin Safety Week Feb 18th-24th, 2018

Posted February 19, 2018 by Erin

Join Us for Grain Bin Safety Week

Feb. 18th – 24th, 2018

Ag Organizations Partner to Save Lives

Over the past 50 years, more than 900 cases of grain engulfment have been reported in the U.S. with a fatality rate of 62 percent. In 2010, at least 26 U.S. workers were killed in grain engulfments – the highest number on record. The most tragic fact of all: grain engulfments are highly preventable.

Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency and Nationwide are partnering with KC Supply Co, CHS Inc., National Education Center for Agricultural Safety (NECAS) and many others to increase awareness of the dangers of flowing grain and bring visibility to advancements in safety procedures and technology that can save lives through this exciting annual event.

Timed to bring safety awareness to the dangers of grain bins, a period when many farmers and grain-handling operations are planning for the upcoming season, this week-long event will highlight a different component each of the seven days:

  • Sun. Feb. 18: Personal Grain Bin Entrapment Cautionary Case
  • Mon. Feb. 19: How to Stay Safe When Freeing Bridged Grain
  • Tues. Feb. 20: Grain Bin Automation
  • Wed. Feb. 21: Procedures for Safe Grain Bin Entry
  • Thurs. Feb. 22: Choosing the Rescue Tube That’s Right for You
  • Fri. Feb. 23: GBSW 2018 Youth Initiative
  • Sat. Feb. 24: Reduce Grain Bin Fires with Quality Storage Practices

Highlights of the Week

#AgChat

Nationwide, along with partners KC Supply and NECAS, will host #AgChat on Twitter Tuesday, February 20 at 7PM CST. This moderated, online conversation will look at grain bin safety from different angles and generate insight from folks involved in the business of growing food, fuel, feed and fiber. Go to Twubs.com/agchat to view conversation or to tweet during the chat.  The site automatically enters the #agchat hashtag in every tweet and allows users to participate in real time.

Webinar – Grain Bin Safety

On Wednesday, February 21st, Nationwide will host a free, live webinar on grain bin safety that’s open to everyone. Farmers and commercial grain handlers will gain valuable insight into updated safe-work procedures, safety trainings, grain rescue practices, equipment trainings, OSHA standards and more. Space is limited so reserve your spot now. Register here.

Nominate Your Local Fire Department Rescue Tube Contest

Contest period: The contest runs from January 1 to April 30, 2018.

A popular event in conjunction with Grain Bin Safety Week (Feb. 18-24, 2018), Nationwide is again teaming up with the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety (NECAS), KC Supply and others to award emergency first responders with grain rescue tubes and hands-on rescue training to help save lives.

2018 marks the 5th year of Grain Bin Safety Week and the Nominate Your Fire Department Contest. Since its inception, the contest has received nearly 2,000 nominations and has awarded grain rescue tubes and hands-on rescue training to 48 fire departments across 18 states. Two of the tubes have been used to save the lives of two farmers.

To enter, provide your name, regular mail and email addresses, the name and address of your local fire department or emergency rescue team, and one page describing how the local fire department or rescue team and rural community would benefit from grain entrapment training and rescue tube, and how they plan to share the tube and training with nearby departments.

Completed nominations can be emailed to agcontest@nicc.edu or mailed to: NECAS, Grain Bin Safety Contest, 8342 NICC Dr., Peosta, IA 52068.

For more information about or to participate in Grain Bin Safety Week in 2018, go to GrainBinSafetyWeek.com.

 

About Nationwide Agribusiness

Nationwide Agribusiness Insurance Company, and its affiliate, Farmland Mutual Insurance Company, are members of Nationwide®. Nationwide Agribusiness, rated A+ (Superior) by The A.M. Best Company, is the country’s #1 insurer of farms and ranches*, and a leading insurer of commercial agribusiness and related businesses in the food, fuel and fiber chain. For more information, visit NationwideAgribusiness.com.

About Nationwide                                                                    

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, based in Columbus, Ohio, is one of the largest and strongest diversified insurance and financial services organizations in the U.S. and is rated A+ by both A.M. Best and Standard & Poor’s. The company provides customers a full range of insurance and financial services, including auto insurance, motorcycle, boat, homeowners, pet, life insurance, farm, commercial insurance, annuities, mortgages, mutual funds, pensions, long-term savings plans and specialty health services. For more information, visit Nationwide.com.

 

*Source: 2016 SNL Financial Report. Based on statutory data.

For official rules and prize descriptions, visit grainbinsafetyweek.com/contest/rules official

 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Convince the Next Generation to Invest in Farming

Posted February 12, 2018 by Administrator

Farming is hard work and often a risky venture. It also demands much of the farmer’s time, leaving a perception of a workaholic who garners few rewards. It is also not a glamorous job and does not appeal to the masses. With the deck stacked against them, it is a wonder farmers succeed at all. Limited interest has led many farmers to turn to the next generation, their children, to take on the family business. Unfortunately, growing up on the farm has not inspired second generations to pick up where their parents left off.

Selling the Next Generation on Farming

Second generation farmers represent an important stepping-stone between the ruthless first steps of building a farm and its potential golden years of prosperity. Second generation farmers do not have to contend with crippling farm debt, loans to pay for machines, and so on. Nevertheless, the next generation balks at the lifestyle change. Even if the assets are stable, the shift to living on a farm is significant. Their fear of failure is also paramount.

However, future farmers have a significant advantage over their parents. Back in the 1960s and 70s, there was a massive back-to-the-land movement. For one of the only times in recent history, rural growth outpaced urban growth. However, these would-be farmers were entering unknown territory blind. They had no scientific data and next to no communication options. Next generation farmers have all the benefits of an established farming operation plus a wealth of information. The explosion of information across the web has made farming success easier than ever.

Creating Succession Where None Exists

Not all farmers have obvious heirs to their enterprise. When this is the case, many wait until it is too late to establish a line of succession. If a farmer does not have a clear line of succession, that individual needs to start planning sooner rather than later. Waiting to establish an heir until retirement means extended working years and a higher chance of failure.

To do this, most farmers look to their existing workers. Many farms have shining stars amongst the plethora of employees. Once farmers begin the conversation of transference, they can draft an agreement on how to shift their chosen heir from employee to owner. Most farmers start by giving 10% ownership to their employee and sign over a small percentage each successive year.

The process is slow for a reason. All relationships take work, and grooming an heir is no exception. It is less of a complete takeover and more of a partnership. For several years, if not decades, the transference process will look more like business partners working side by side than an owner retiring. This process is difficult, but Cline Wood can help. If you are struggling with retirement or farming succession planning, contact us today.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

What You Need to Know About Used Equipment Prices

Posted January 22, 2018 by Administrator

The summer of 2014 marked the beginning of a downward trend for used equipment prices, particularly for late model equipment and large machinery. Now, after a four-year spiral, costs have bottomed out. Dealers are asking for similar prices for the same equipment as they did last year. This puts equipment and machinery at 60-65% of their value compared to 2014. While farmers looking to buy equipment may rejoice at the low prices, not everything is good news.

The Good and the Bad of Low Used Equipment Prices

The halt in plummeting prices ends the growing gap between the values of owned equipment versus new equipment. This is great for farmers looking to buy used large or late model machines as prices remain at an all-time low. Because prices have bottomed out, the used machines are likely to retain their value as well. Dealers are even providing low-interest financing options, so the time to buy used machinery is now.

However, there are drawbacks to low equipment values. Decreased equipment values tank farmers’ relative borrowing power at the bank as lenders may disagree over the true value of their farming operations. Farmers can help mitigate this issue by researching what their equipment is worth. Finding recent sales on auction sites of similar equipment can give farmers an idea of what their machinery value is.

Controlling Equipment Costs

Even though costs are at a historic low, machinery expenses across the board are rising. This is in large part because farmers are upgrading their equipment with the latest technology. Farmers need to assess their equipment needs to prevent costs from exceeding their means.

This is not always a simple task. Farmers have many questions including whether they should trade their large machines now or hold off, should they downgrade their equipment, or should they work for longer during the day. As the premier agribusiness insurance provider, Cline Wood can help farmers answer these questions and more. To learn more about managing farming expenses, contact us today.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Prevent Catastrophic Losses Due to Fire

Posted January 8, 2018 by Administrator

Fires happen on farms for a variety of reasons. Knowing the risk factors and implementing methods to reduce them go a long way toward improving safety. However, nothing short of a solid insurance policy will help recoup losses should a fire actually occur. This is the harsh lesson a Montana family is learning.

Destructive Blaze Razes Workshop

On the evening of December 5, 2017, a workshop on the Gordon Farm caught fire. By the time several fire departments responded to the blaze, the flames had overwhelmed the workshop. The structure held three generations worth of farming tools and equipment including a Ford 4000 tractor, a welder, and a grain drill. The family lost antique tools as well.

In total, the damage and losses amounted to $500,000. Making a bad situation worse, the family did not have insurance for the building or the tools. However, the family is counting their blessings. Many of the family members work in the shed well into the night. On this evening, no one was in the building and the family was able to account for everyone’s safety.

The Importance of Insurance

While the family is fundraising to help recoup some of their losses, a solid insurance policy would serve them better. The family indicated they could not afford the premiums, but it only takes one blaze to prove the value of insurance. If your farming operation is also struggling with budgeting for insurance, contact the experts at Cline Wood. We can help you find the coverage you need at the best prices.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

3 Useful Tips to Boost Safety on Dairy Farms

Posted January 2, 2018 by Administrator

Unlike other agribusinesses, employees on dairy farms spend a significant amount of time in contact with animals. If they do not take care when handling livestock, the risk of an injury skyrockets. Dairy farming is a high-risk job, so employees need to make themselves aware of their surrounding at all times. Because they work with large animals, dairy farmers are more likely to be crushed, kicked, stepped on, or fallen on by cows. By heeding the following safety reminders, dairy farmers and employees can reduce their risk of injury.

Visual and Aural Cues

Dairy cattle have binocular vision, meaning they can see almost all the way around themselves. The exceptions are a blind spot at their nose and at their rear. As such, it is best to approach dairy cattle from the side. Cattle are also sensitive to loud and high-pitched noises. Farmers and employees should approach the cattle making soft sounds to avoid scaring the animal. Unexpected loud noises can also spook animals, so avoid banging gates or making other abrupt noises.

Avoid Isolation

Cattle are herd animals so they prefer to be near other cattle. Separating them can make them nervous or stressed. This includes working with an individual animal. If a farmer or employee needs to tend to a specific cow, they should be sure to bring another one along to keep the cow calm.

Remember Past Experiences

Cattle are intelligent creatures with a long memory. If a cow had a painful experience in the barn, it may be unwilling or uncooperative when a farmer tries to bring it back to that same place. There are several warning signs to tell if a cow is agitated. It may raise its head, tail, or the hair on its back. It may also pull its ears back, show its teeth, paw at the ground, or snort.

By following the above precautions and staying aware of the cattle at all times, farmers and employees can avoid injuries. However, no amount of safety prevention can supplement a high-quality insurance policy in the event of an injury. As the leading provider of agribusiness insurance, Cline Wood can help your farming operation determine its risk level and how much coverage it needs. To learn more about protecting yourself and your farm, contact us today.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Reduce Electrical Threats on the Farm

Posted December 11, 2017 by Administrator

Unlike other farming risks, electrical threats are unforgiving. There is rarely a second chance to learn from electrical safety mistakes. Electrocution can cause severe damage and even result in death. That is why it is vital for farmers to make themselves aware of all electrical threats on their land and develop methods to manage them. On the farm, the most common electrical threats are wires and cables that provide electricity to the farm. These can be overhead or underground. Physical electrical installations pose significant risks as well.

Managing Electrical Risks

Proper education and maintenance can help prevent most electrical incidents. For example, farmers who educate their workers on underground cable locations can avoid accidents due to digging too close to the lines. Inspecting installations can also reveal maintenance issues and allow farmers to address them before they cause an accident.

Repairs

Repairing electrical problems is a risky venture in and of itself. Farmers should take care never to touch fallen wires. They should also remember that anything touching exposed electrical wires is electrified as well. For example, an entire fence can become an electric threat if a downed wire is touching it. Farmers can do their part by replacing damaged equipment, but they should leave any major electrical job to the professionals.

Dos and Don’ts of Electrical Safety

While most farmers know not to work too close to electrical poles or disturb underground cables, there are several other electrical safety tips they should follow. These include:

  • Keep emergency phone numbers on hand to address electrical issues as fast as possible
  • Stay away from fallen electrical wires and contact the appropriate authorities to manage them
  • Employ electrical contractors to manage repairs and installations
  • Remember that electrical cables and wires are always live—even fallen and low hanging wires—farmers should not approach or touch them
  • Never make assumptions about electrical safety

There are several risks on farms—some more forgiving than others are. Electricity does not often afford a second chance so it behooves farmers to take all possible electrical safety precautions. While farmers cannot prevent all risks, following the above safety measures can help. To learn more about farm safety, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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