Viewing posts categorised under: Farm Safety

National Safety Month – Hazard Recognition

Posted June 6, 2019 by Erin

As part of National Safety Month, we at Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency, are highlighting key aspects of safety that you can incorporate into your existing safety program. Below are links to three safety-focused articles that expand upon principles of hazard recognition, and what can be done to not only identify exposures early on, but also to reduce or even eliminate these exposures before a serious injury or accident occurs.  As one source put it: “It’s usually the most obvious things that you miss”… “The things you walk past a thousand times and never realized they’re an issue – that’s what this is. That’s what we’re training people not to do. That’s part of the reason we feel like we’re really onto something.”¹

 

The Hierarchy of Controls

 ‘Seeing’ Safety in a New Way

 Recognizing Hidden Dangers

 

¹ Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/17952-seeing-safety-in-a-new-way (Safety+Health Magazine on 1/27/19 by Barry Battino, accessed 6/5/19)

 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Tough Winter Leads to Challenging Spring

Posted April 26, 2019 by Erin

Several ranchers have just faced one of the roughest and most challenging winters in recent years.  As a result of the dicey winter, producers are now facing an unfavorable spring.

The cold and wet conditions that were present during the winter have led to thinner-than-normal cows. When discussing those conditions, Justin Waggoner, a beef systems specialist with K-State Research and Extension, said, “…both of those [cold and wet] increase the energy requirements of the cows.” It takes more energy stores for a cow to do any of their normal, daily activities in the mud than it would if they were on dry ground. When talking specifically about the impact of the cold weather, Waggoner notes, “When those temperatures drop below 18 degrees, we can see a pretty dramatic increase in energy requirements.” [1]

When producers are trying to maintain body condition in their herd, it is helpful to focus on the protein and energy need. Waggoner explained that protein sources were usually well covered by supplementation, but quality energy sources can often be lacking. To rectify that concern, high-fiber sources of energy can often be a producer’s strongest bet. Producers are currently dealing with a hay supply that is both tight and expensive. As a result, concentrated nutrition sources – like range cubes or dried distillers grain – could play a major role in benefiting the health of producers’ herds.[1]

If a producer is unable to maintain or improve the body conditioning of their cattle, they may want to consider culling a little more aggressively than usual during this season of their operation. If you are looking for additional ways to ensure the success of your operation, let Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency help. Our team takes pride in understanding the Agribusiness industry and the unique insurance needs these operations require. We partner with our clients to provide a comprehensive safety and risk management program specific to your needs. We look forward to answering any questions you may have regarding coverage for your commercial business, email or call us today.

 

Resources:  [1] Kansas State University Research And Extension. (2019, April 3). Tough Winter Leads to Challenging Spring for Kansas Cattlemen. Retrieved from Drovers: Driving the Beef Market: tough-winter-leads-challenging-spring-kansas-cattlemen

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

 

Work Zone Safety

Posted April 1, 2019 by Erin

At Cline Wood, a Marsh & McLennan Agency, it’s our mission to partner with you in ensuring your drivers are safe, accident-free, and avoid costly claims that can have a major impact on both your drivers and your business. Below are several great safe driving tips that we strongly encourage you to share with your drivers and incorporate into your safety training.

 

Loss Lesson: Slow Down in Work Zones

Before entering a work zone, decrease your speed, merge into the correct lane well ahead of any lane closures, and be prepared to slow down or stop suddenly.25 Speed increases perception-reaction distance, braking distance, and stopping distance.17

Did You Know? Nearly a quarter of all work-zone deaths in 2006 involved a large truck.26

Did You Know? In October 2003, a CMV driver was traveling at 60 mph in a 45 mph work zone on the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway in Illinois. The truck driver rear-ended a 25-passenger bus. The crash caused a five-vehicle pileup, killing 8 women and injuring about a dozen others. As a result of the crash, the truck driver was charged and convicted of reckless homicide and sentenced to 4 years in prison.27,28

Source: FMCSA – https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/safety/driver-safety/cmv-driving-tips-too-fast-conditions

 

 

Tips to Reduce Your Chance of a Work Zone Accident

  • Pay attention to work zone signs.
  • Leave enough space between you and the motorist in front of you.
  • Be prepared to stop or slow unexpectedly.
  • Expect to stop when you see a FLAGGER AHEAD sign.
  • If stopped or slowed in a traffic queue, consider turning on your flashers to warn traffic coming up behind you.
  • Watch for traffic and workers going into or out of the work zone.
  • Get into the open lane as soon as possible at lane closures.
  • Be aware of motorists racing to get ahead of you or trying to turn in front of you at the last second.
  • Use alternative routes to avoid work zones whenever feasible.

 

Click HERE for a complete, downloadable flyer

Source: Work Zone Safety Consortium – www.workzonesafety.org

 

 

Disclaimer:

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

 

Grain Bin Safety Week 2019 – Fires and Explosions

Posted February 22, 2019 by Erin

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  Sparks and molten material in excess of 1000’ F can easily ignite nearby flammable materials, liquids or atmospheres resulting in a fire and/or explosion with potentially catastrophic consequences.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Follow these guidelines when hot work is performed:

  • Wear appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and/or clothing to minimize the potential for burns, trapped sparks and electric shock
  • Utilize fire watches during hot work operations
  • Don’t clean while performing hot work
  • Don’t allow machinery or equipment to be operated or grain to be dumped nearby hot work operations
  • Install a designated fire watch for 30 minutes at the completion of hot work. It’s a good practice to inspect hot work area periodically thereafter and once more before closing

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Grain Bin Safety Week 2019 – Lock Out Tag Out

Posted February 21, 2019 by Erin

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  Grain bin safety starts with maintaining grain quality in storage, which means learning and  practicing better stored-grain quality management,  while closely monitoring grain condition.  If you can prevent grain spoilage, you may be able to eliminate the leading cause of bin entry.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Before entering a bin, all mechanical, electrical,  hydraulic and pneumatic equipment, which presents a danger to workers inside grain storage structures, must be de-energized and disconnected; locked out and tagged; blocked off or otherwise prevented from operating by other equally-effective means or methods.  Discharge augers must be disconnected from power, locked out and tagged; and loading augers powered by  a Power Take-Off (PTO) must be shut off and disconnected to eliminate the possibility of someone turning on the auger while someone else is in the bin.

Whenever workers perform service or maintenance on machinery or equipment, they must isolate that equipment from all energy sources.  Workers must use an energy-isolating locking device to lockout equipment, or place a tagging device on it, according to established and documented procedures.

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

2019 Grain Bin Safety Week – Confined Space Entry

Posted February 20, 2019 by Erin

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  The OSHA Grain Handling Facilities standard/rule (29 CFR 1910.272) requires that prior to entering a grain bin, the employer either (1) issue an entry permit or (2) be present during the entire entry.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

The OSHA Grain Handling Facilities standard does apply to the following industry types:

  • Grain elevators
  • Feed and Flour Mills
  • Pelletizing Plants
  • Rice and Corn Mills
  • Soybean Flaking
  • Soy Cake Grinding

The OSHA Grain Handling Facilities standard does apply to the following types of grain storage structures:

  • Bins
  • Silos
  • Grain Tanks
  • Other Grain Storage Structures

Confined Space Entry Procedures also apply to:

  • Pits
  • Tanks
  • Vessels
  • Hoppers
  • Vaults

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

2019 Grain Bin Safety Week – Entrapment and Engulfment

Posted February 19, 2019 by Erin

 

 

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  These hazards include: fires and explosions from grain dust accumulation, suffocation from engulfment and entrapment in grain bins, falls from heights and crushing injuries and amputations from grain handling equipment.  According to researchers at Purdue University, more than 900 cases of grain engulfment have been reported with a fatality rate of 62% in the past 50 years. In 2010, at least 26 U.S. workers were killed in grain engulfment accidents − the highest number on record.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Storage and handling of grain creates unique hazards.  Potential hazards include engulfment and entrapment, injury from falls, and respiratory and breathing problems from inhalation of dust, molds and allergens.  Be aware of these entrapment and engulfment hazards when working around grain bins:

  • Flowing grain – Grain is flowing when a bin is being unloaded from the bin. Flowing grain can act like quicksand, pulling a person into the grain and entrapping them in a matter of seconds. Suffocation and death is often the result.
  • Bridged grain – Bridged grain occurs when the top layer crusts over a void making the bin appear full. It may look safe, but walking on the bridge may cause it to collapse, engulfing you. Break up the crusted grain from outside the bin with a long pole.
  • Columned grain – Columned grain occurs when grain is stuck to the side walls of a bin, creating very steep slopes. Avalanching can occur, engulfing anyone near the base of the column. Break up the crusted grain from outside the bin with a long pole.
  • Due to the dangers associated with grain bins, youth working on farms and agribusinesses should NEVER enter a grain bin.
  • Engulfment in grain bins can result in multiple fatalities when others attempt to rescue and become victims as well.  Rescues should only be attempted by properly trained and equipped professionals.

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

2019 Grain Bin Safety Week – Safely Entering a Grain Bin

Posted February 19, 2019 by Erin

 

The grain handling industry is a high hazard industry where workers can be exposed to numerous serious and life threatening hazards.  Grain bin entry is extremely dangerous and exposes farmers and commercial grain handlers to serious hazards.  Suffocation can occur when  workers are engulfed by grain or when bins develop oxygen-deficient atmospheres.  To add to the tragedy, when other workers or family members attempt to  rescue a person in distress, they too can fall victim.  Although bin entry should always be a last resort to accomplish a task, there are times when workers must  enter a grain bin.  To help  ensure worker safety, all farmers and commercial grain handlers should strictly follow OSHA’s grain-handling standard and requirements for entering a bin, including developing and implementing a written  bin entry program.  To educate employers, employees and the public about safety in the grain handling industry, Grain Bin Safety Week is held February 17-23, 2019.

Before any bin-entry activities can occur, OSHA  requires workers to be trained for the specific hazardous work operations they are to perform.  Workers need to understand the hazards, equipment shut-down and  lock-out procedures, air testing and how to properly  tie off when entering above grain that can engulf.  When a worker enters a grain bin from a level at or above the level of the stored grain, or whenever a worker stands on or in stored grain, the worker must use a harness and safety line that’s securely tied to a fixed, overhead-anchor point.  A lifeline attached to any location other than an overhead-anchor point is useless in preventing engulfment and may only serve as a means to locating a body.

Workers should be reminded to never walk down  grain — a practice strictly prohibited under OSHA’s  grain handling standard.  Walking down grain is when a worker walks on top of grain, while equipment is running, in an effort to make it flow.

To download a PDF of this information to share with your team, click HERE.

For more information visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com

 

 

Source: https://www.nationwide.com/agribusiness-risk-management-options.jsp and 

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Assessing Risk in the Farming Industry

Posted October 9, 2018 by Administrator

Running a successful farm takes hard work and careful risk management. Farms face several unique risks that don’t affect other industries. However, assessing those risks follows the same process. While the degree of acceptable risk and the approach to handle it will differ from person to person, the framework for identifying risks remains unchanged.

Develop a Risk Heat Chart

A heat chart provides a simple visual tool to identify if a risk is significant enough and likely enough to address. The chart below is a simple illustration comparing the potential effect of a risk on the left and the likelihood of the risk occurring on the bottom. The darker the color, the more damage the risk can cause to the business.

To make a usable risk heat chart, farmers need to perform the following:

  1. Pinpoint things that can go wrong. This includes external and internal risks. This step is critical because many farmers overlook risks they think are unlikely, which can come back to haunt them later. Some external risks include fluctuating markets, law and regulations governing farming, and weather events. Internal risks can be a loss of employees due to failing health or quitting, damage to assets such as a barn fire, personal debt, and more.
  2. Estimate the potential effect. Once farmers identify risks that can affect their farm, they need to determine how much it can hurt their operation. Farmers will want to seek input from employees to gain a balanced view of the risks. Using the above heat chart, farmers can assign five categories ranging from negligible to severe for the potential effect the risk can exert on the farm.
  3. Estimate how likely the risk is. Similar to the above step, farmers need to look at their risks and determine how likely they are to happen. From there, they can assign them to one of five categories ranging from remote to probable.

Once farmers know their risks and decide how much they can affect the business and how likely they are to occur, they can plug them into the various slots on the heat chart. For example, if a farmer estimates that a drought it possible this year (category 3 risk) and the potential effect is severe (category 5), this creates a risk score of 15—one of the hottest risks on the heat chart. This tells the farmer he or she needs to develop a risk management strategy to protect their farming operation. All farms have risks they need to address, but they don’t need to do it alone. The experts at Cline Wood can help you identify all risks that could affect your farm as well as implement strategies to mitigate them. Contact us to learn more.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

How to Reduce the Risk of Salmonella on Poultry Farms

Posted August 6, 2018 by Administrator

The CDC estimates Salmonella causes 1 million foodborne illnesses per year. Of those incidents, 19,000 result in hospitalization and more than 300 end in death. Individuals suffering from Salmonella often experience abdominal pain, diarrhea, and a fever. More often than not, individuals who contract the disease had multiple elements at play such as not cooking the poultry to the correct temperature. However, poultry farmers have a duty to reduce the risk and spread of Salmonella by adhering to best practices on the farm.

6 Ways to Reduce Bad Bacteria Contamination

Bacterial contagions come from a variety of sources. The most common include:

  • Water
  • Wild birds or pests
  • Visitors
  • Farm personnel’s hygiene and sanitation

To stop the spread of Salmonella on the farm, farmers and workers need to focus on the following areas:

  1. Cleanliness and hygiene. Growing houses are a significant source of contamination on farms. Workers need to ensure they clean these areas between flocks to prevent the spread of residual bacteria. Keeping pests such as flies and rodents under control can help with these efforts as well.
  2. Managing water sources. Water is an easy way for Salmonella bacteria to spread from bird to bird. Some tactics that prove effective are utilizing chlorinated water or organic acids.
  3. Reducing dust. Much like water, dust can contribute to the spread of Salmonella. Farmers should aim for dust levels at 3mg per cubic meter or less.
  4. Contaminated grains can result in Salmonella in the final feed product. Farmers should only purchase grain and feed from mills that adhere to rigorous quality control standards.
  5. Encouraging proper gut flora. Farmers need to establish a good gut flora balance in chicks within days of hatching. This can prevent Salmonella from colonizing them. Ways to achieve this include organic acids, enzymes, and yeast technologies.
  6. Cocci management. Coccidiosis is a disease that affects the intestines of birds and causes diarrhea. It also contributes to the spread of Salmonella so farmers need to implement effective controls to reduce instances of coccidiosis.

Raising healthy poultry free from contagion isn’t just a good farming practice; it also helps keep consumers in good health. Salmonella is just one of the risks poultry farmers have to manage. To learn more about protecting your poultry farm, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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