Showing posts from tagged with: trucking best practices

Rule to require e-logs pushed back: Here’s latest projected date

Posted September 28, 2015 by Erin

A Final Rule to require truck operators to use electronic logging devices has been delayed a month, according to a report released this week by the Department of Transportation. The rule is now forecasted to be published Oct. 30.

The rule will take effect two years following its publication, the date by which fleets, owner-operators and drivers must be using electronic logging devices that satisfy the rule’s requirements.

See more at: http://www.ccjdigital.com/rule-to-require-e-logs-pushed-back-heres-latest-projected-date/?utm_source=weekender&utm_medium=email&utm_content=09-20-2015&utm_campaign=Commercial%20Carrier%20Journal&ust_id=b97fba2504&#sthash.SLLNXfKD.dpuf

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Top 10 States for hours-of-service violations

Posted September 9, 2015 by Erin

ViolationMap

As a primer for some more in-depth reporting on FMCSA’s Compliance, Safety, Accountability program set to be published later this month, here’s a look at the 10 states with the most hours-of-service violations:

http://www.ccjdigital.com/top-10-states-for-hours-of-service-violations/?utm_source=daily&utm_medium=email&utm_content=09-09-2015&utm_campaign=Commercial%20Carrier%20Journal&ust_id=b97fba2504&

 

 

 

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FMCSA Future Enhancements to SMS Causing Carrier Concerns

Posted August 20, 2015 by Erin

Commercial vehicle associations are weighing in with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) on the Agency’s intent to incorporate several enhancements to the Safety Measurement System (SMS). Most notably, the changes will affect the Behavior Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs) scores which would be publicly available on the FMCSA/SMS website and used by the Agency to prioritize and intervene with motor carriers that pose the greatest safety risk. The American Bus Association (ABA) and the American Trucking Associations (ATA) have submitted detailed accounts of their positions on the changes FMCSA is proposing to affect, both positive and negative, and express concern for some of the methods prescribed, especially in light of the Government Accountability Office (GAO) finding that due to data and methodology issues, SMS scores are often unreliable indicators of future crash risk. The associations are in agreement that while many of the proposed changes are consistent with the goals of the Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) program, FMCSA needs to focus on refining crash data to more accurately reflect carriers’ safety performance and better crash risk connection.

 

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MCS-150 and Other Updates Available Through URS

Posted August 20, 2015 by Erin

URSlogoFederal Motor Carrier Safety Administration requires all entities under its jurisdiction to update their information every two years. You are required to provide this update every two years even if your company has not changed its information, has ceased interstate operations since the last update, or is no longer in business and you did not notify FMCSA.

http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/unified-registration-system

 

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CVSA’s 2015 Annual Brake Safety Week is September 6-12

Posted August 20, 2015 by Erin

During the week of Sept. 6-12, 2015, law enforcement agencies across North America will conduct brake system inspections on large trucks and buses to identify out-of-adjustment brakes and brake-system violations as part of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) Brake Safety Week.

Read more about CVSA’s inspection procedures at http://cvsa.org/programs/nas.php

Brake-related violations comprised the largest percentage (representing 46.2 percent) of all out-of-service violations cited during Operation Airbrake’s companion International Roadcheck campaign in 2014.

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Top 5 Best Practices for Highway Breakdowns

Posted August 18, 2015 by Administrator

shutterstock_118561318 - CopyHighway breakdowns occur every day, across the country. Observing safety best practices can save time, money, and even lives. It’s crucial for all drivers in your organization to familiarize themselves with safety practices, and to always employ them when experiencing a breakdown. Here are our top 5:

  1. Look for the safest spot on the shoulder and pull over. Wider breakdown areas are generally safer, and corners should be avoided. Stay calm and focused.
  2. Call for help. This can include roadside assistance, emergency personnel, or your corporate response team. Ascertaining your location will make this call more productive.
  3. Increase visibility beyond your hazard lights. If you can safely exit your vehicle and have roadside flares available, place them approximately 50 feet behind your car. You can also raise your hood to alert motorists that your vehicle is inoperative.
  4. Stay with your vehicle. If you’ve called for roadside service, you must be present when help arrives. If you exit your vehicle, stay away from the traffic flow. Walking along a highway is dangerous. Many people are killed each year while walking beside busy roads.
  5. Don’t try to be a mechanic. If you have insufficient experience with diagnosing engine issues or executing a tire change, proceed with extreme caution. It can be challenging to change a tire in your driveway – doing so beside a busy highway is significantly more difficult and dangerous. Before considering this, it’s best to wait for the police to arrive. They will help you determine if it’s safe to change your tire and can slow down traffic if you decide to do this.

To learn more about driver safety best practices, transportation safety, and related issues, contact us.

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Bridge Strikes a Serious Hazard for Commercial Trucks

Posted August 11, 2015 by Administrator

bridge strikesA bridge strike is where a vehicle crashes into a bridge that has a railway on it or into a bridge that is built over the railway. Bridge strikes are a crucial problem. In the U.S. there are over 1,500 strikes of bridges per year. It causes a significant problem because after the strike, trains are unable to travel over it until it is repaired and inspected. Often trains have to be diverted, trips cancelled, and travelers delayed for significant amounts of time.

Bridge strikes are a serious safety hazard. Bridge strikes have cause injuries, death, damage to the infrastructure, interruption of carrier transportation and delays in travel time.

Bridge strikes can be avoided. Better awareness of route restrictions can be communicated through highly noticeable road signs and industry-standard electronic navigation systems.

There is a penalty for failing to comply with a posted route restriction along a roadway. The maximum penalty is $11,000 for a company, $2,750 for a driver. Source: Appendix B to 49 CFR part 386, paragraphs (a)(3) and (a)(4). (Electronic Code of Federal Regulations)

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is working to address the issue of bridge strikes. They have offered the following information to help interested parties recognize the work being done to eliminate bridge strikes.

  • The FMCSA will work with its State and local partners to ensure they understand their enforcement authority against motor carriers and drivers that fail to abide by roadway signs
  • The FMCSA will work with its State partners and the truck and bus industries to distribute the Agency’s visor card “GPS Selection Guide for CMVs
  • The Agency will also work with commercial driver training school associations to encourage them to include electronic navigation system selection information in their training programs.

FMCSA’s information systems do not have crash statistics associated with the use of electronic navigation systems. However, even one truck or bus striking an overpass is one too many, which is why the Agency is taking action to ensure professional truck and bus drivers know the importance of selecting the right navigation system.

To learn more about transportation safety, risk reduction, and best practices, contact us.

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Popular Trucking Insurance & Best Practices Blogs

Posted March 27, 2015 by Administrator

Cline Wood specializes in a wide variety of coverages to suit the needs of the transportation industry, from independent owner operators to large nationwide fleets. Beyond coverages, we understand the needs, concerns, and challenges of commercial vehicle operation in 2015. To gain some useful knowledge, check out some of our popular blogs on the subject, including:

For more on these and other important topics related to transportation safety and insurance coverages, visit our blog again soon or contact us today.

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Protect Your Transportation Business from Negligent Hiring Claims

Posted February 26, 2015 by Administrator

Frequent regulatory changes have brought about a consistent rise in negligent hiring and retention claims. Yet many carriers do not fully understand the concept of negligent hiring. If you don’t understand it, how can you be sure to avoid it?

Negligent hiring is claimed by an injured party against an employer based on the premise that the employer knew or should have known about the employee’s background, and that the employee’s background would indicate dangerous or untrustworthy character. Examples of negative background information include high accident frequency, multiple major moving violations, and even substance abuse. These claims are recognized in almost every state and have resulted in payouts averaging more than $1 million dollars each.

Your trucking business can avoid these potentially costly claims by engaging in hiring practices that mitigate your exposure to liability. Improving hiring practices , but here are the basics:

  • Hire based on many factors – the more information, the better
  • Consider all aspects of hiring liability and their potential impact
  • Leverage MVRs and PSPs to ascertain the following:
    • Safety-orientation
    • Customer focus
    • Integrity
    • Independence
    • Compliance

Many steps are necessary to establish liability-oriented hiring protocols that will stand up to strict scrutiny in a court of law. To avoid spending your time and money in court, contact us.

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Transportation Safety & Being a Positive Presence on the Road

Posted February 5, 2015 by Administrator

Commercial trucks are typically the largest and most noticeable vehicles on the road. Being seen is seldom a challenge, but projecting a positive influence on driver safety can be much more difficulty. Some automobile drivers are oblivious while others are aggressive. There are also those who are simply anxious in the presence of a large truck. Conducting your commercial vehicle in a manner that is both safe and considerate will minimize the chances of your company receiving negative calls about you, and maximize the chances of garnering good will toward your employer and trucking professionals in general. There are many recommended behaviors to observe and avoid, including:

Positive Behaviors:
  • Using high beams when appropriate
  • Maintaining the reflective tape around the truck and trailer
  • Keeping lights and reflectors clean and well-maintained
  • Ensuring other drivers see you – make eye contact or use your horn
Detrimental Behaviors:
  • Speeding in densely populated areas
  • Merging or change lanes aggressively
  • Attempting to pass another truck until other drivers have done so
  • Driving close enough to other vehicles that it makes drivers uncomfortable
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