Showing posts from tagged with: transportation safety practices

Top 10 States for hours-of-service violations

Posted September 9, 2015 by Erin

ViolationMap

As a primer for some more in-depth reporting on FMCSA’s Compliance, Safety, Accountability program set to be published later this month, here’s a look at the 10 states with the most hours-of-service violations:

http://www.ccjdigital.com/top-10-states-for-hours-of-service-violations/?utm_source=daily&utm_medium=email&utm_content=09-09-2015&utm_campaign=Commercial%20Carrier%20Journal&ust_id=b97fba2504&

 

 

 

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Cell Phone Usage While Driving Important Safety Concern for Truck Drivers

Posted May 6, 2015 by Administrator

There’s no doubt – texting while driving is a major issue, not just for the regular motorist, but for professional truck drivers as well. Looking away from the road can be deadly for any motorist, but is especially dangerous when a truck that is driving a semi becomes distracted.

Even though there is a federal law that prohibits commercial drivers from holding a phone while they drive, Congress has yet to mandate hands-free devices in all commercial vehicles. Headsets or Bluetooth devices are the two types of hands-free technology currently available on the market.

The National Transportation Safety Board is calling for legislation that will require truck manufacturers to install technology that would not allow any cell phone to be used in the vehicle at any speed, but right now this issue is not on any lawmaker’s agenda.

shutterstock_2826279smThis is surprising, even after four North Central Texas College softball players were killed in an Oklahoma bus crash last year. The driver of the 18-wheeler, who failed to apply the brakes or take evasive action before his truck crossed the median and struck the side of the bus, admitted he was distracted by his cell phone.

Even though the penalties for texting while driving are steep (drivers face a $2,700 fine plus a $233 fine from the state when caught) drivers admit they see it and that it “happens frequently.”

Local law enforcement officials have found it difficult to enforce the federal cell phone ban. This is because the commercial driver sits up higher than the highway patrolman in his or her vehicle. Some areas have built special enforcement lanes on bridges so law enforcement can view the truck cabs. But even then it can be difficult for the officer to tell if the driver is using a cell phone.

Manufacturers are not likely to implement the “no cell while driving” technology until it is required by law. The Federal Motor Carrier’s Association is in support of the anti-cell phone technology for moving semi-trucks.

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Transportation Safety & Being a Positive Presence on the Road

Posted February 5, 2015 by Administrator

Commercial trucks are typically the largest and most noticeable vehicles on the road. Being seen is seldom a challenge, but projecting a positive influence on driver safety can be much more difficulty. Some automobile drivers are oblivious while others are aggressive. There are also those who are simply anxious in the presence of a large truck. Conducting your commercial vehicle in a manner that is both safe and considerate will minimize the chances of your company receiving negative calls about you, and maximize the chances of garnering good will toward your employer and trucking professionals in general. There are many recommended behaviors to observe and avoid, including:

Positive Behaviors:
  • Using high beams when appropriate
  • Maintaining the reflective tape around the truck and trailer
  • Keeping lights and reflectors clean and well-maintained
  • Ensuring other drivers see you – make eye contact or use your horn
Detrimental Behaviors:
  • Speeding in densely populated areas
  • Merging or change lanes aggressively
  • Attempting to pass another truck until other drivers have done so
  • Driving close enough to other vehicles that it makes drivers uncomfortable
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