Showing posts from tagged with: transportation liability

Feds to Hold Livestock Haulers Responsible for Inhumane Treatment of Animals

Posted October 12, 2016 by Administrator

livestock imageIn an unprecedented ruling, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Inspection Service has announced a new proposed policy that would hold livestock transporters responsible for the mistreatment of the animals they carry. The new rule would allow civil or criminal action to be taken against instances of animal abuse related to animals with a connection to an official slaughterhouse establishment.

The current law holds farm owners and slaughterhouses solely responsible for the care of animals in conjunction with slaughter. This policy proposal is the first time that carriers will be held accountable for the handling of the livestock they are hired to transport. This is significant because many of the truck carriers are not employed by either the farmers or the slaughterhouses and are therefore exempt from the current law. Policymakers hope that the new policy will improve the welfare of livestock during transport.

One major change policymakers have explicitly included in the proposed rule is that speeding while transporting livestock will be considered inhumane treatment. Speeding while hauling animals bound for slaughter has been known to result in the animals slipping and becoming injured due to falls. Under the proposed new ruling, FSIS can investigate and find the transportation professional liable. The FSIS believes the new ruling will improve conditions for livestock bound for slaughter by making sure the proper procedures for hauling will be enforced.

The official notice will be published in the Federal Register. The proposed policy will go into effect in 90 days unless public comment calls for a revision of the ruling. At Cline Wood we represent top agribusiness insurance carriers across the country with access to all types of insurance programs. We treat your company as if it were our own. Our goal is to go beyond simply providing you with affordable insurance. Contact us today to find out how we can help you manage your risk, which directly contributes to your bottom line.

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Distracted Walking Can Lead to More Crashes

Posted July 6, 2016 by Administrator

shutterstock_204934576 - CopyThe issues with distracted driving plagues the owners of commercial fleets. When their drivers and other motorists try to text and drive they can be the cause of multi-vehicle crashes, putting everyone on the road at risk. But what businesses may not be aware of is the risk caused by distracted walking.

Whether you manage a fleet of business vehicles or commercial trucks, you need to teach your drivers to be aware of the fact that pedestrians may not be paying attention to traffic and your employees need to be more vigilant.

4th of July Dangers

These dangers increase for holiday weekends. A record breaking 43 million Americans are expected to be traveling for 4th of July and 84% of them will be driving to their destination. More people on US highways leads to more problems as texting, surfing and other distracted driving habits increase the risk of a crash.

Increased Number of Pedestrians

When these motorists reach their destinations and get out of their vehicles they still present a hazard to drivers of your commercial fleet. Cities that are considered walkable, such as New York City, Washington DC, Chicago, and San Francisco will be inundated with additional pedestrians spending their vacation at popular destinations.

The Property Casualty Insurers Association of America (PCI) warns that distracted walking is as hazardous as distracted driving. Pedestrians transfixed by their mobile devices take longer to cross a street and may not be paying attention as they walk. If they are still trying to text while they are in the middle of an intersection they may not realize the light has changed and they are now a hazard to motorists.

An increase in distracted behavior, a record number of motorists and an increase it pedestrian tourists can make for hazardous conditions for your truckers and employees. Make sure your business is covered by contacting the experts at Cline Wood today.

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Protect Your Transportation Business from Negligent Hiring Claims

Posted February 26, 2015 by Administrator

Frequent regulatory changes have brought about a consistent rise in negligent hiring and retention claims. Yet many carriers do not fully understand the concept of negligent hiring. If you don’t understand it, how can you be sure to avoid it?

Negligent hiring is claimed by an injured party against an employer based on the premise that the employer knew or should have known about the employee’s background, and that the employee’s background would indicate dangerous or untrustworthy character. Examples of negative background information include high accident frequency, multiple major moving violations, and even substance abuse. These claims are recognized in almost every state and have resulted in payouts averaging more than $1 million dollars each.

Your trucking business can avoid these potentially costly claims by engaging in hiring practices that mitigate your exposure to liability. Improving hiring practices , but here are the basics:

  • Hire based on many factors – the more information, the better
  • Consider all aspects of hiring liability and their potential impact
  • Leverage MVRs and PSPs to ascertain the following:
    • Safety-orientation
    • Customer focus
    • Integrity
    • Independence
    • Compliance

Many steps are necessary to establish liability-oriented hiring protocols that will stand up to strict scrutiny in a court of law. To avoid spending your time and money in court, contact us.

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