Amendment to Delay Commercial Truck Driver ELD Mandate Fails in U.S. House of Representatives

Posted September 18, 2017 by Administrator

An amendment to delay the roll out of the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate that is slated to go into effect December 17, 2017 was recently defeated in the U.S. House of Representatives. The amendment would have stalled the EDL enforcement date for ten months.

Rep. Brian Babin (R-Texas) was sponsored by Rep. Brian Babin (R-Texas.) The amendment would have restricted funding for enforcement through the 2018 fiscal year, effectively delaying the mandate until September 30, 2018. The amendment was defeated with a 246-173 final vote.

Babin has also filed a bill in the House that will delay the ELD mandate’s enforcement date by two years to December 2019. This bill has been referred to the House of Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation. The bill is seeking the implementation of the ELD mandate by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) be delayed for two years to give drivers time to make the transition from paper logs to an electronic logging device.

The purpose of the ELD rule is to create a safer work environment for drivers. It will also make it easier and faster to track and share records of duty status (RODS) information. The ELD will synchronize with the engine of the commercial vehicle to automatically record driving time, making sure that Hours of Service (HOS) records are accurate.

There are exceptions to the ELD mandate. The following drivers are not required, by law, to use an ELD, unless they volunteer to do so.

  • Drivers who use traditional logs no more than 8 days during any 30-day period
  • So called driveaway-towaway drivers (drivers who transport an empty vehicle for sale, lease or repair)
  • Drivers of vehicles manufactured before the year 2000

An evaluation by the FMCSA studied the safety benefits for carriers that utilize an ELD. The FMCSA found that there is an 11.7% reduction in crash rates and a 50% reduction in hours-of-service violations; it is estimated that implementation of the ELD mandate will prevent 1,844 large truck crashes and save the lives of at least 26 people each year.

Motor carriers that meet the agricultural exemption or the covered farm vehicle FMCSA exemptions are not subject to the ELD rule while operating under the terms of the exemption. The duty status of the driver may be noted as either “off-duty” or “exempt.” Click here for more information on the agricultural exemption for the ELD mandate.

National Farm Safety and Health Week to Focus on Implementing Safety Practices

Posted September 13, 2017 by Administrator

Farming has always been a hazardous job with many risks not seen in other industries. Because of this, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a proclamation in 1944 to bring more attention to the plight of the everyday farmer. The goal of this proclamation was to reduce farming injuries as their steadily increasing numbers were hindering the war effort. That proclamation is now known as National Farm Safety Week. This year, National Farm Safety Week runs from September 17 through September 23.

In spite of this increased focus, agribusinesses represent one of the most dangerous industries in the country. For example, over 400 farmers and farmhands died from work-related accidents in 2015. While these numbers are grim, the farming industry is experiencing improvements in safety and decreases in injuries. To continue this trend, the National Farm and Safety Week theme is focusing on implementing safety best practices. Below is a summary of events for the week:

  • September 18: Tractor safety
  • September 19: Farmer health and wellbeing
  • September 20: Health and safety of children
  • September 21: Confined spaces
  • September 22: Rural thoroughfare safety

Below are some highlights of each segment to help farmers improve safety and reduce risks.

Tractor Safety

  • Tractors and transportation accidents are the most common cause of death on farms. Tractors rolling over represent a significant amount of these incidents. As such, farmers should make use of roll over protective structures (ROPS).
  • Relating to farm transportation, farmers should implement safety practices to reduce run over incidents and PTO entanglements as well.
  • Farmers should also avoid risky shortcuts. The potential time saved is not worth the risk. Maintain vehicles and fix mechanical issues to reduce the temptation to make use of a dangerous bypass.

Farmer Health

Many farmers experience health issues later in life. Some are hard of hearing while others may require oxygen. However, farmers can avoid many of these health concerns by wearing personal protective equipment (PPE). This includes:

  • Respirators
  • Eye protection
  • Hearing Protection

Farmers should also look after their mental wellbeing in addition to their physical health. Isolation is a leading factor in depression so farmers should take their mental health seriously.

Health and Safety of Children

Each year, around 110 children and teenagers die from farming incidents. Causes range from machinery incidents to ATVs to drowning and more. This particular day will focus on creating areas that are safe for children to play as well as educating farmers on how to make farms safer for kids.

Confined Spaces

Farmers encounter hazardous gas and entrapment dangers when entering manure or grain pits. This particular day will focus on how to store and access grain as well as how to enter manure pits safely.

Rural Thoroughfare Safety

When farm vehicles and passenger vehicles collide, there are grievances on both sides. Instead of focusing on who is at fault, this day will concentrate on ways farmers and passengers alike can reduce the risk of an accident.

Cline Wood is dedicated to improving farm safety. As the leading provider of agribusiness insurance, we can help farmers identify and reduce risks. To learn more, contact us.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Three Tips to Reduce Farming Risks

Posted September 5, 2017 by Administrator

Many individuals use the term risk when discussing farming when they really mean uncertainty. Risks are measurable; farmers can calculate and prepare for them. Uncertainties are not quantifiable which means farmers cannot gauge them. While most people do not like to dwell on the negative, farmers cannot afford to ignore risks within their operation. Below are several risks that farmers can address and mitigate straightaway.

Clear Contingency Plans

No one likes to consider his or her mortality, but it is necessary to ensure farms continue to run smoothly during adverse events. Farmers need to make sure vital employees have a backup team in place. Backup employees can be existing staff members. These substitute workers should have all necessary skills to perform the job, so farmers may need to cross train these individuals. Contingency plans are not only in place for deaths. They allow farmers to leave the farm if needed without bringing business to a halt.

Family Feuds

Farms are often a family operation, but this presents challenges. Power struggles and secrecy plague family businesses. These issues are particularly damaging during a transfer of leadership. Almost all family businesses suffer from communication problems. Some examples include authoritarianism, refusing to accept blame, and ongoing disputes. Farmers can hire consultants who specialize in family businesses to address communication issues. Bringing in a third party will help keep emotions out of business discussions.

Victims of Success

While many business owners may think there is no such thing as too much success, farmers are at an increased risk of expanding at an unsustainable rate. Before taking advantage of a growth opportunity, farmers need to analyze the costs of their current operation as well as how much money they have in reserve. Farmers need to make sure they can bear the burden of increased costs while waiting for returns. They also need to address logistical elements. For example, if a farmer purchases new land two hours away from his or her home, he or she needs to determine who will manage it.

Farmers cannot remove every threat to their operation. Some are uncontrollable, such as the environment. However, several farming risks are manageable and farmers should take steps to confront them. Cline Wood can help farmers identify risks specific to their farms and suggest methods to managing them. To learn more, contact us today.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Multiple Factors Drive Rise in Refrigerated Commercial Trailer Sales

Posted August 28, 2017 by Administrator

The refrigerated trucking industry is of critical importance to both the trucking industry and the U.S. economy as a whole. The refrigerated trucking industry hauled 520.1 million tons of freight in 2015, which was 5 percent of all truck freight. Refrigerated freight generates $14.3 billion in revenue annually, which is 1.9 percent of all truck revenue ($748.9 billion.)

The demand for refrigerated transportation has increased since 2014, according to ACT Research Co, a commercial vehicle transportation and research company. The growth can be attributed to several factors, including new federal food handling requirements that went into effect in March 2016, as part of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA.)

The primary driver of the demand, according to the ACT Research study, is the consumer demand for fresh food and eating out. Food service businesses and food carriers are scrambling to keep up with the demand. U.S. refrigerated trailers are scrambling to keep the pipeline full and transportation moving.

In 2014, a record 46,500 refrigerated trailers where shipped by U.S. manufacturers, which is the highest to date. Then, in 2016 46,000 reefer trailers were shipped, making it the second highest in refrigerated trailer sales.

ACT is projecting 43,000 refrigerating trailer units will be sold in 2017. Refrigerated trailer sales are expected to remain solid in the near future. In addition to food, the refrigerated transport market includes electronics, pharmaceuticals and ammunition, which are shipped in refrigerated trailers.

Cline Wood represents top trucking insurance carriers across the country. To learn more about the issues that concern commercial truck carriers today, trucking insurance coverage and risk management, contact us here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Safety Tips for Storing Fuel on the Farm

Posted August 18, 2017 by Administrator

Improper handling of gasoline or diesel fuel can result in explosions, fires, and injuries on farms. Farmers can reduce these risks by taking the proper safety precautions when storing and using fuel. Below are several simple safety measures farmers can follow.

  • Do not allow children near fuel.
  • Keep fuel storage containers far from buildings and structures on the farm.
  • Perform regular maintenance on fuel containers and address any corrosion or leaks.
  • Only store fuel in appropriate containers. Do not use containers meant for food or beverages.

Farmers and farmhands can avoid most fuel-related accidents by utilizing the above safety tips. However, there are other fuel-related hazards farmers need to address as well. These include the handling of flammable liquids, refueling equipment, and managing fuel storage.

Flammable Liquids

Gas, diesel fuel, and paint solvents are just some of the flammable liquids found on farms. Individuals need to take the following precautions when handling these kinds of liquids to avoid fire or explosions.

  • Store flammable liquids far away from uncontained fires or motors that spark.
  • Be cautious with empty containers that previously held a flammable liquid. Lingering vapors can still combust. Keep these containers away from fires and sparks as well.
  • Take pains to ensure all fuel containers have accurate labels and follow all directions for using the containers.

Refueling Tractors and Gas-Powered Equipment

Proper storage and transport of fuel are useless if there is a lapse in safety protocol when refueling. Farmers and farmhands need to exercise caution when refueling. Some safety recommendations for this process include:

  • Avoid spilling fuel on skin. It can cause irritation.
  • Avoid breathing in fumes as it can result in dizziness and headaches.
  • Turn off the engine and allow it to cool before refueling.
  • Dispense fuel slowly and avoid overfilling.
  • Refuel small equipment in the open. Refueling in a small enclosure can result in fume inhalation.

Fuel Storage

There are several safe storage solutions for farmers. For example, aboveground fuel tanks are cost effective, easy to relocate, and are unaffected by minor flooding. Below are some additional fuel storage safety suggestions.

  • Keep fuel storage containers and facilities out of direct sunlight. Farmers can either use canopies or make use of natural shade. If a farmer cannot avoid sun exposure, he or she can invest in a pressure-vacuum relief valve to minimize evaporation.
  • Keep fuel storage areas clear of trash and weeds to reduce the risk of fire.

While farms may present several hazards, farmers do not need to fall victim to them. Making use of the above safety tips will reduce the risk of explosions and fires. To learn more about protecting your farm, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

ELD Exemption for Truckers Transporting Agricultural Goods

Posted August 10, 2017 by Administrator

Many fleets are busy ensuring their trucks are compliant with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) new electronic logging device (ELD) regulation. However, one sector of the trucking industry is at an impasse. Truckers that transport livestock or agricultural goods are under different time constraints than those who transport non-perishable cargo. It is not a simple matter of delivering goods on a certain timetable; the animals’ welfare and produces’ spoilage rate affect delivery as well.

Agricultural Exemption Specifications

To address these issues, the FMCSA granted certain exemptions to these truckers for one year. The FMCSA granted this extension in order to collaborate with producers to find a workable solution. The primary exemption is for truckers transporting livestock. They do not need to track their Hours of Service (HOS) with an ELD for the duration of the one-year delay. Current FMCSA HOS regulations encompass an 11-hour driving limit, a 14-hour on duty limit, and a 60-hour limit for the entire workweek.

The FMCSA granted drivers delivering agricultural commodities an exemption as well. If the trucker can conduct his or her hauls within 150 air miles, he or she does not need to log their driving time or mileage. However, once the driver goes beyond the 150 air mile zone, he or she must use their ELD and follow all HOS rules.

The FMCSA allowed these exemptions and one-year delay to avoid crippling the agriculture industry. The U.S. DOT agency plans to work with truckers transporting agricultural goods to draft new regulations tailored to their needs. Managing an agribusiness is difficult under the best of circumstances. This delay can help agricultural transporters stay in business while developing safety improvements. To stay up to date with the latest regulations affecting agribusinesses, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Is Natural Gas the Future Fuel of the Trucking Industry?

Posted August 3, 2017 by Administrator

The importance of natural gas in the marketplace is growing, especially in the trucking and shipping industry. For the past decade, companies that use large amounts of fuel, such as FedEx, UPS, Southwest Airlines and cruise ship companies have been concerned about the lack of a national energy policy as well as the increasing dependency of the country on imported petroleum.

In 2005, the U.S. Energy Security Leadership Council was formed to develop a long-term, comprehensive policy to reduce U.S. oil dependence and improve national energy security. The Council identified three recommendations for the nation to secure America’s future energy safety.

  1. Produce as much of our own energy in the United States as possible
  2. Reduce energy consumption, and
  3. Develop alternatives to imported petroleum.

The U.S. has a massive supply of natural gas that will meet our needs far into the future. Natural gas has recently received renewed attention as an alternative fuel for the trucking industry.

Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture that consists primarily of methane. Natural gas is found in natural rock formations deep underground. About 88 percent of the natural gas consumed in the U.S. is found in the U.S. Most of the rest is found in Canada (10.5 percent). A very small amount (1.5 percent) is imported as liquefied natural gas. Since most of our natural gas resources are domestic, the potential economic impact of converting fleets to natural gas is extremely positive compared with importing millions of barrels of oil from overseas, as is currently the case.

Besides the obvious benefit of improving our economy and increasing national security, there are other benefits of natural gas. The U.S. Department of Energy has found that natural gas vehicles emit lower emissions. Natural gas vehicles produce significantly lower amounts of harmful emissions when compared with vehicles fueled with conventional diesel.

Natural gas fueled vehicles have been shown to have reduced emission rates of:

  • nitrogen oxides
  • particulate matter
  • toxic and carcinogenic pollutants, and
  • greenhouse gas carbon dioxide.

Converting even a small percentage of current trucking fleets to natural gas could significantly impact the U.S. in a positive way.

In addition to reducing fewer emissions, natural gas saves money on fuel. Currently, the cost of diesel is above the $4 per gallon mark. Natural gas currently costs about $1.89 per gallon. This is less than half of the cost of diesel. The trucking industry consumes about $53.9 billion gallons of fuel a year. If these trucks all switched to natural gas, they’d save about $108 billion.

Natural gas as fuel for the transportation industry seems too good to be true. It’s inexpensive, and its emissions are significantly lower than those emitted by petroleum. But there is a catch; any methane gas that escapes instead of burning is much more impactful than emissions from petroleum bases fuel. When it comes to air quality, more research needs to be done to understand and find a practical, sustainable solution.

In order to further study and explore solutions, The Environmental Defense Fund is conducting research to measure methane leaks at various stages of refueling as well as operations.

Natural gas is a domestic resource that can reduce fuel costs, decrease our dependence on overseas oil purchases and improve our environment. With continued collaboration and commitment to high performance standards, natural gas will be a win for future generations of shippers and motor vehicle fleets.

Cline Wood represents top trucking insurance carriers across the country. To learn more about the issues that concern commercial truck carriers today, trucking insurance coverage and risk management, contact us here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Hay and Straw Pose Major Fire Risks to Barns

Posted July 26, 2017 by Administrator

Most individuals look for water to put out a fire, but hay and straw are the exceptions to this rule. When hay and straw become too wet, they can increase in temperature and erupt into flames. While this is more common with hay than straw, the risk exists for both. This is because moisture causes the bacteria in hay and straw to release heat. If the bacteria dies, the bales will cool. However, if the bacteria gains a foothold, temperatures can soar over 175 degrees Fahrenheit.

How to Store Wet Bales

Farmers should store their wet bales outdoors or in a large, open area. In addition, farmers should not stack wet bales as this prevents heat and moisture from leaving. It is important to note that hay often goes through a sweat period in the initial days after baling. Temperatures can increase up to 110 degrees Fahrenheit without causing concern.

Most Common Fire Risks

Several factors influence the combustibility of hay and straw. For example, hay is most like to catch on fire during the first six weeks after baling. Other factors include:

  • Fields with wet spots
  • Moisture levels exceeding 20%
  • Bales containing more than 20% of hay preservative

How to Monitor Wet Bales

Farmers with at-risk bales of hay or straw need to keep a close watch to avoid fires. They should check the bales two times per day for the first six weeks after baling or until temperatures return to stable levels. To obtain a proper temperature reading, farmers should probe the center of the bale or at least eight feet down into oversized bales.

Determining Critical Temperatures

Below is a list of temperatures and the necessary actions farmers should take to avoid a fire.

  • <125°–No immediate action
  • 150°–This is approaching the fire hazard zone. Monitor twice per day. Farmers can take bales apart to promote airflow.
  • 160°–This is the point of a fire hazard. Farmers should check bales every two hours and take bales apart. Farmers should recruit the fire department before unstacking additional bales.
  • 175°–Bales are likely to have hot pockets at this temperature. Farmers should inform the fire department of a potential incident. Farmers can also create a tight seal on barn doors to remove oxygen.
  • 190°–Farmers need the assistance of the fire department to remove overheated bales at these temperatures. Bales may burst into flame so farmers should wet down tractors.
  • >200°–A fire is likely at this temperature. In addition to the precautions above, farmers should have fire hose lines ready to go.

While taking preventative measures is key to avoiding barn fires, they can still happen. Farmers need to invest in insurance to protect their assets in the event of a barn fire. As a leading provider of agribusiness insurance, Cline Wood can help farmers identify and manage fire risks as well as discuss their insurance needs. Contact us to learn more.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

What Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers Need to Know about Diesel Exhaust Fluid

Posted July 19, 2017 by Administrator

In 2007, semi truck and engine manufacturers began installing DEF fuel tanks in order to meet federal emissions regulations that went into effect in 2010. The new technology, called selective catalytic reduction (SCR), is an aftertreatment that is injected in small amounts into a diesel engine’s exhaust stream. DEF stands for Diesel Exhaust Fluid. The exhaust stream, which is hot, vaporizes the DEF to form ammonia and carbon dioxide, which is passed over a catalyst and converted into nitrogen and water, which is harmless.

DEF is kept in a separate reservoir tank. DEF is composed of 32.5% high-purity urea and water. Urea is a compound of organic nitrogen that is used commonly in agriculture for fertilizer.

The SCR technology not only reduces pollution, but also saves on fuel. Since the engine no longer has to be tuned to reduce the toxic NOx, it can be adjusted for better fuel economy.

The fuel tank on your truck that has the blue cap is called the DEF fuel tank. When you remove the blue cap, you will notice there is a smaller opening than what’s on the diesel fuel tank. If at all possible, when you go into the commercial card lock or the truck stop try to get bulk DEF fuel. You don’t want to have to deal with the small jugs or containers. The smaller jugs require a funnel and are not as convenient as purchasing it in bulk. Some truck stops will only carry it in the smaller containers, but if at all possible it is best to purchase in bulk.

Once full, a DEF fuel tank will last for about six fills on diesel fuel. So you don’t have to fill it every time you refuel. Just make sure you check it regularly to ensure you don’t get stuck and end up having to use the messy jug system.

There are two fuel gauges on the dash of your rig. One is for the diesel fuel and the other one is for the DEF tank. Keep an eye on your dash gauges so you don’t run into a situation where you get too low.

The biggest concern when it comes to storing DEF is the possibility of contamination. Although DEF is non-toxic, non-polluting and non-flammable, it has to be kept in a plastic container to avoid corrosion. It also has to be kept in a temperature-controlled location and out of direct sunlight. It can be kept for years when stored properly.

If you need to store DEF, here are a few tips to safeguard it from contamination.

  1. Do not refill previously used containers.
  2. Be sure to insert the DEF nozzle into the tank’s inlet to avoid contaminating the spout.
  3. Use only dedicated DEF equipment for storing and dispensing. Do not use funnels or containers that have been used for other purposes.
  4. Do NOT use tap water if you need to rinse the fueling equipment. You must use de-mineralized water.
  5. Keep DEF away from substances such as oil, grease, water, dust, fuel, dirt, metal or detergent.

Diesel engines and systems operate better using SCR technology and fleets appreciate the fuel cost savings the DEF system offers. Cline Wood represents top trucking insurance carriers across the U.S. To learn more about the issues that concern commercial truck companies today, trucking coverage and risk management, contact us.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Farm Safety: Identifying Hazards and Managing Risk

Posted July 12, 2017 by Administrator

Investing in insurance is a necessary precaution for farmers. But farmers can take additional steps to protect their investment. For example, avoiding accidents can help minimize injuries and reduce claims. Farmers need to be aware of common hazards, implement safety measures, and train workers to recognize potential threats. While all farms are different, below are some of the most common risks farmers face.

  • Pesticides and herbicides are commonplace on farms. However, failure to use these chemicals with proper precaution can result in burns, respiratory distress, and poisoning.
  • Animals on a farm can inflict several types of injuries. These include crushing, trampling, biting, kicking, and more. Animals can transfer diseases to humans as well such as giardia and ringworm.
  • Any machine with unprotected moving parts can cause injuries. Examples include chain saws and tractors without roll over protection structures (ROPS).
  • Small spaces. Enclosed, tight spaces pose suffocation and poisoning risks. Silos and manure pits, for example, can trap toxic vapors.
  • Drowning is a very real risk on farms. This is especially true for young children in particular. Any body of water, natural or manmade, poses a risk.
  • While most farmers consider weather to be a hazard to their crops, it can also deal out damage to humans as well. Exposure to the elements can result in sunburns, dehydration, hypothermia, and more.

Farmers can take several steps to reduce these risks. Performing regular visual assessments of the farm can help farmers identify potential hazards. Educating all farmhands on risks and best safety practices can reduce injuries. Storing dangerous equipment in a safe location as well as performing regular maintenance on machinery can prevent injuries as well.

As the leading provider of agribusiness insurance, Cline Wood can help farmers identify risks and improve safety. To learn more about farming safety, contact Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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