Viewing posts categorised under: Transportation

Amendment to Delay Commercial Truck Driver ELD Mandate Fails in U.S. House of Representatives

Posted September 18, 2017 by Administrator

An amendment to delay the roll out of the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate that is slated to go into effect December 17, 2017 was recently defeated in the U.S. House of Representatives. The amendment would have stalled the EDL enforcement date for ten months.

Rep. Brian Babin (R-Texas) was sponsored by Rep. Brian Babin (R-Texas.) The amendment would have restricted funding for enforcement through the 2018 fiscal year, effectively delaying the mandate until September 30, 2018. The amendment was defeated with a 246-173 final vote.

Babin has also filed a bill in the House that will delay the ELD mandate’s enforcement date by two years to December 2019. This bill has been referred to the House of Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation. The bill is seeking the implementation of the ELD mandate by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) be delayed for two years to give drivers time to make the transition from paper logs to an electronic logging device.

The purpose of the ELD rule is to create a safer work environment for drivers. It will also make it easier and faster to track and share records of duty status (RODS) information. The ELD will synchronize with the engine of the commercial vehicle to automatically record driving time, making sure that Hours of Service (HOS) records are accurate.

There are exceptions to the ELD mandate. The following drivers are not required, by law, to use an ELD, unless they volunteer to do so.

  • Drivers who use traditional logs no more than 8 days during any 30-day period
  • So called driveaway-towaway drivers (drivers who transport an empty vehicle for sale, lease or repair)
  • Drivers of vehicles manufactured before the year 2000

An evaluation by the FMCSA studied the safety benefits for carriers that utilize an ELD. The FMCSA found that there is an 11.7% reduction in crash rates and a 50% reduction in hours-of-service violations; it is estimated that implementation of the ELD mandate will prevent 1,844 large truck crashes and save the lives of at least 26 people each year.

Motor carriers that meet the agricultural exemption or the covered farm vehicle FMCSA exemptions are not subject to the ELD rule while operating under the terms of the exemption. The duty status of the driver may be noted as either “off-duty” or “exempt.” Click here for more information on the agricultural exemption for the ELD mandate.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Multiple Factors Drive Rise in Refrigerated Commercial Trailer Sales

Posted August 28, 2017 by Administrator

The refrigerated trucking industry is of critical importance to both the trucking industry and the U.S. economy as a whole. The refrigerated trucking industry hauled 520.1 million tons of freight in 2015, which was 5 percent of all truck freight. Refrigerated freight generates $14.3 billion in revenue annually, which is 1.9 percent of all truck revenue ($748.9 billion.)

The demand for refrigerated transportation has increased since 2014, according to ACT Research Co, a commercial vehicle transportation and research company. The growth can be attributed to several factors, including new federal food handling requirements that went into effect in March 2016, as part of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA.)

The primary driver of the demand, according to the ACT Research study, is the consumer demand for fresh food and eating out. Food service businesses and food carriers are scrambling to keep up with the demand. U.S. refrigerated trailers are scrambling to keep the pipeline full and transportation moving.

In 2014, a record 46,500 refrigerated trailers where shipped by U.S. manufacturers, which is the highest to date. Then, in 2016 46,000 reefer trailers were shipped, making it the second highest in refrigerated trailer sales.

ACT is projecting 43,000 refrigerating trailer units will be sold in 2017. Refrigerated trailer sales are expected to remain solid in the near future. In addition to food, the refrigerated transport market includes electronics, pharmaceuticals and ammunition, which are shipped in refrigerated trailers.

Cline Wood represents top trucking insurance carriers across the country. To learn more about the issues that concern commercial truck carriers today, trucking insurance coverage and risk management, contact us here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

ELD Exemption for Truckers Transporting Agricultural Goods

Posted August 10, 2017 by Administrator

Many fleets are busy ensuring their trucks are compliant with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) new electronic logging device (ELD) regulation. However, one sector of the trucking industry is at an impasse. Truckers that transport livestock or agricultural goods are under different time constraints than those who transport non-perishable cargo. It is not a simple matter of delivering goods on a certain timetable; the animals’ welfare and produces’ spoilage rate affect delivery as well.

Agricultural Exemption Specifications

To address these issues, the FMCSA granted certain exemptions to these truckers for one year. The FMCSA granted this extension in order to collaborate with producers to find a workable solution. The primary exemption is for truckers transporting livestock. They do not need to track their Hours of Service (HOS) with an ELD for the duration of the one-year delay. Current FMCSA HOS regulations encompass an 11-hour driving limit, a 14-hour on duty limit, and a 60-hour limit for the entire workweek.

The FMCSA granted drivers delivering agricultural commodities an exemption as well. If the trucker can conduct his or her hauls within 150 air miles, he or she does not need to log their driving time or mileage. However, once the driver goes beyond the 150 air mile zone, he or she must use their ELD and follow all HOS rules.

The FMCSA allowed these exemptions and one-year delay to avoid crippling the agriculture industry. The U.S. DOT agency plans to work with truckers transporting agricultural goods to draft new regulations tailored to their needs. Managing an agribusiness is difficult under the best of circumstances. This delay can help agricultural transporters stay in business while developing safety improvements. To stay up to date with the latest regulations affecting agribusinesses, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Is Natural Gas the Future Fuel of the Trucking Industry?

Posted August 3, 2017 by Administrator

The importance of natural gas in the marketplace is growing, especially in the trucking and shipping industry. For the past decade, companies that use large amounts of fuel, such as FedEx, UPS, Southwest Airlines and cruise ship companies have been concerned about the lack of a national energy policy as well as the increasing dependency of the country on imported petroleum.

In 2005, the U.S. Energy Security Leadership Council was formed to develop a long-term, comprehensive policy to reduce U.S. oil dependence and improve national energy security. The Council identified three recommendations for the nation to secure America’s future energy safety.

  1. Produce as much of our own energy in the United States as possible
  2. Reduce energy consumption, and
  3. Develop alternatives to imported petroleum.

The U.S. has a massive supply of natural gas that will meet our needs far into the future. Natural gas has recently received renewed attention as an alternative fuel for the trucking industry.

Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture that consists primarily of methane. Natural gas is found in natural rock formations deep underground. About 88 percent of the natural gas consumed in the U.S. is found in the U.S. Most of the rest is found in Canada (10.5 percent). A very small amount (1.5 percent) is imported as liquefied natural gas. Since most of our natural gas resources are domestic, the potential economic impact of converting fleets to natural gas is extremely positive compared with importing millions of barrels of oil from overseas, as is currently the case.

Besides the obvious benefit of improving our economy and increasing national security, there are other benefits of natural gas. The U.S. Department of Energy has found that natural gas vehicles emit lower emissions. Natural gas vehicles produce significantly lower amounts of harmful emissions when compared with vehicles fueled with conventional diesel.

Natural gas fueled vehicles have been shown to have reduced emission rates of:

  • nitrogen oxides
  • particulate matter
  • toxic and carcinogenic pollutants, and
  • greenhouse gas carbon dioxide.

Converting even a small percentage of current trucking fleets to natural gas could significantly impact the U.S. in a positive way.

In addition to reducing fewer emissions, natural gas saves money on fuel. Currently, the cost of diesel is above the $4 per gallon mark. Natural gas currently costs about $1.89 per gallon. This is less than half of the cost of diesel. The trucking industry consumes about $53.9 billion gallons of fuel a year. If these trucks all switched to natural gas, they’d save about $108 billion.

Natural gas as fuel for the transportation industry seems too good to be true. It’s inexpensive, and its emissions are significantly lower than those emitted by petroleum. But there is a catch; any methane gas that escapes instead of burning is much more impactful than emissions from petroleum bases fuel. When it comes to air quality, more research needs to be done to understand and find a practical, sustainable solution.

In order to further study and explore solutions, The Environmental Defense Fund is conducting research to measure methane leaks at various stages of refueling as well as operations.

Natural gas is a domestic resource that can reduce fuel costs, decrease our dependence on overseas oil purchases and improve our environment. With continued collaboration and commitment to high performance standards, natural gas will be a win for future generations of shippers and motor vehicle fleets.

Cline Wood represents top trucking insurance carriers across the country. To learn more about the issues that concern commercial truck carriers today, trucking insurance coverage and risk management, contact us here.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

What Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers Need to Know about Diesel Exhaust Fluid

Posted July 19, 2017 by Administrator

In 2007, semi truck and engine manufacturers began installing DEF fuel tanks in order to meet federal emissions regulations that went into effect in 2010. The new technology, called selective catalytic reduction (SCR), is an aftertreatment that is injected in small amounts into a diesel engine’s exhaust stream. DEF stands for Diesel Exhaust Fluid. The exhaust stream, which is hot, vaporizes the DEF to form ammonia and carbon dioxide, which is passed over a catalyst and converted into nitrogen and water, which is harmless.

DEF is kept in a separate reservoir tank. DEF is composed of 32.5% high-purity urea and water. Urea is a compound of organic nitrogen that is used commonly in agriculture for fertilizer.

The SCR technology not only reduces pollution, but also saves on fuel. Since the engine no longer has to be tuned to reduce the toxic NOx, it can be adjusted for better fuel economy.

The fuel tank on your truck that has the blue cap is called the DEF fuel tank. When you remove the blue cap, you will notice there is a smaller opening than what’s on the diesel fuel tank. If at all possible, when you go into the commercial card lock or the truck stop try to get bulk DEF fuel. You don’t want to have to deal with the small jugs or containers. The smaller jugs require a funnel and are not as convenient as purchasing it in bulk. Some truck stops will only carry it in the smaller containers, but if at all possible it is best to purchase in bulk.

Once full, a DEF fuel tank will last for about six fills on diesel fuel. So you don’t have to fill it every time you refuel. Just make sure you check it regularly to ensure you don’t get stuck and end up having to use the messy jug system.

There are two fuel gauges on the dash of your rig. One is for the diesel fuel and the other one is for the DEF tank. Keep an eye on your dash gauges so you don’t run into a situation where you get too low.

The biggest concern when it comes to storing DEF is the possibility of contamination. Although DEF is non-toxic, non-polluting and non-flammable, it has to be kept in a plastic container to avoid corrosion. It also has to be kept in a temperature-controlled location and out of direct sunlight. It can be kept for years when stored properly.

If you need to store DEF, here are a few tips to safeguard it from contamination.

  1. Do not refill previously used containers.
  2. Be sure to insert the DEF nozzle into the tank’s inlet to avoid contaminating the spout.
  3. Use only dedicated DEF equipment for storing and dispensing. Do not use funnels or containers that have been used for other purposes.
  4. Do NOT use tap water if you need to rinse the fueling equipment. You must use de-mineralized water.
  5. Keep DEF away from substances such as oil, grease, water, dust, fuel, dirt, metal or detergent.

Diesel engines and systems operate better using SCR technology and fleets appreciate the fuel cost savings the DEF system offers. Cline Wood represents top trucking insurance carriers across the U.S. To learn more about the issues that concern commercial truck companies today, trucking coverage and risk management, contact us.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Webinar: Legal Implications of Electronic Logging Device Implementation and Compliance

Posted July 5, 2017 by Administrator

Join Cline Wood University and Roberts Perryman as we discuss the specifications and legal implications of electronic logging device (ELD) implementation and compliance. Subject matter expert Jason Guerra will address the impact on your trucking business. Topics include:

* The Law, Rules & Deadlines
* Compliance: Supporting Documentation and Technical Specs
* Implementation Issues & Considerations
* Exemptions Regarding Short Haul, Towing, Older Models
* Extension for Use of AOBRDs
* Avoiding Pitfalls

Date & Time: Wed, Jul 12, 2017 12:00 PM – 12:30 PM CDT

To Join: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3771330763710693123

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

How to Prepare Your Drivers for a DOT Motor Vehicle Audit

Posted June 27, 2017 by Administrator

The Department of Transportation (DOT) regularly conducts motor vehicle audits to ensure that carriers are in compliance with applicable regulations. Audits are conducted without prior notice. The types of audits that are conducted include the following:

  • Compliance Review

Checks the vehicle to determine if the equipment meets safety standards. All areas of compliance are covered.

  • Security Review

Reviews the safety plan, training of the driver and other security-related measures.

  • Hazardous Materials Reviews

Comprehensive review that covers all aspects of transporting hazardous materials, such as policies, training, shipping documentation and labeling of containers.

  • New Driver Entrants

Within 3-6 months of the issuance of a USDOT number, a new driver safety audit will be conducted.

Paying attention to details and maintaining thorough records are important keys to passing the audit. It is imperative that you keep a copy of the DOT Compliance Checklist, Level 1 DOT Commercial Vehicle Inspection as well as a current North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria publication issued by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance on board your rigs so that drivers can refer to them as needed.

Here are 4 tips to help your company fleet stay in compliance and be prepared for a DOT audit.

  1. Talk with your drivers

As a fleet owner, it is vitally important for you to build rapport with your drivers so that there is a trust relationship. If you perceive the driver is making mistakes, you need to understand why the mistakes are happening and have enough of a relationship for there to be honest dialog with the goal of resolving the issues. Your drivers are the life of your business; they are the people that move your loads. They will be the ones that either make or break your business.

The inspection officer will begin the audit by interviewing the driver. During the interview, the officer will be inspecting the interior of the cab to ensure the cab and dash instruments are in good repair. The officer will also be looking for evidence of drug and/or alcohol usage during the cab inspection.

  1. Make Sure Your Equipment is in Good Repair

Use the Level 1 DOT Commercial Vehicle Inspection Checklist to determine if your vehicle is in compliance. Pay careful attention to the seat belts, windshield wipers, emergency lights, brake lights, lighting devices of all types, emergency exits, electrical cables, braking systems, fuel systems, exhaust systems, electrical cables, etc.

  1. Keep Your Paperwork and Logs Organized and Up-to-Date

It’s vitally important that your driver’s record keeping is organized and current so that he or she can easily demonstrate to an inspector that everything is in order. Make sure they know where their fire extinguisher and triangles are, and their documents are in order. Make sure they keep their information in a place that is easy to access and that everything is complete.

  1. The Attitude of the Driver is Important

Help your drivers understand how to maintain a respectful, cooperative attitude. If a driver is argumentative, sullen or uncooperative, the inspector is likely to demand a Level 1 Inspection. A driver with a cooperative, positive attitude will have a smoother experience and the inspection will go much quicker.

Your drivers should expect an inspection at any time. Work with them to help them understand the importance of passing their inspections, and support them in developing the systems they need to keep things organized and up-to-date. Maintain a positive relationship with them and model courtesy, respect and a professional attitude at all times.

Following these general guidelines will help your drivers pass their DOT inspections in a timely, efficient manner, helping them get back on the job working for your company.

Cline Wood represents top trucking insurance carriers across the country. To learn more about the issues that concern commercial truck companies today, trucking coverage and risk management, contact us.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Preventing Slips, Trips and Falls

Posted June 26, 2017 by Erin

Sometimes all it takes is one time slipping on a wet surface to cause a debilitating injury to a worker’s back, a broken bone, or worse.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 800 work-related fatalities and over 300,000 total work-related injuries due to slips, trips and falls in 2015.[1]

Once an injury occurs, a worker is typically unable to work for an extended period of time, potentially meaning less income.  There could also be significant medical expenses and decreased ability to conduct your normal daily activities, making it difficult to take care of your loved ones.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

    1. ONLY WEAR STURDY, WATERPROOF WORK BOOTS
      This helps keep your feet dry and prevents them from slipping off most surfaces.  NO flip flops, slides, or sandals.
    2. MAKE SURE YOUR WORK BOOTS HAVE GOOD NON-SLIP TREAD
      This helps give you good traction in adverse weather conditions and prevents slips/falls.  If your work boots are old, chances are good the tread is worn down and it’s time for a new pair.
    3. MAKE SURE YOUR WORK BOOTS HAVE A STEEL SAFETY TOE
      This helps prevent injuries from bumps or items accidentally dropped on your foot.
    4. REVIEW YOUR SURROUNDINGS
      Look around you to see if there are any potential hazards, like potholes, water/snow on the ground, etc.
    5. USE THREE POINTS OF CONTACT
      When getting in or getting out of your truck or trailer, make sure you have either two hands and one foot, or two feet and one hand making contact with the truck the whole time.  This helps ensure stability.

     

    If you follow these basic guidelines you will drastically reduce the chance of a slip, trip or fall type of accident.  Your employer and your family will also appreciate your efforts to work safer and come home happy and healthy at the end of the workday.

    If you should have any questions regarding the information above or would like to discuss other safety topics, please don’t hesitate to contact Cline Wood at 888-451-3900 or safetrucking@clinewood.com.

    [1] Sources: https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2016/4836-fatal-work-injuries-in-the-united-states-during-2015.htm; https://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/osh2.pdf


    This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Technical Highlight: How Differentials and Differential Locks Work on Commercial Trucks

Posted June 20, 2017 by Administrator

What does a differential do and how does the differential lock work on big trucks? A differential is a part of the rear axle. The differential is the axle that provides power to the unit and moves it forward whether it’s a passenger vehicle, a big truck or a bus. Most passenger vehicles today are front-wheel drive so they will not have a differential; semi-truck tractors are rear-wheel drive and therefore do have differentials.

The root word of “differential” is “difference.” Basically, a differential allows the vehicle to have different speeds for each wheel that is attached to the rear axle. The purpose of having different speeds is so that when you turn a corner the outside wheel needs to accelerate at a faster rate than the inside wheel. The inside wheel is functionally “fixed” and goes at a much slower rate than the outside wheel. The wheels need to be able to turn at different speeds; thus, you have a differential.

When you have a differential you will have gears that will allow one wheel to effectively have free play and the other one to accelerate faster. Sometimes a truck will get “stuck”;  when that happens the differential will direct power out to the wheel with the least resistance. Therefore, one wheel will spin if you get stuck (like in a large mud puddle) unless you have the differential lock (diff lock) engaged.

Big rigs have what’s known as a diff lock that helps with traction and driving at slow speeds. On the back of a big truck you will usually have two axles called a set of tandem axles. Both axles in the set of tandem axles have a differential unit on them. On most trucks you will have a single diff lock that will lock up the front axle in the set so all 8 tires in the set will turn in tandem. If you are driving in snowy conditions it is recommended that you put chains on the wheels in the front because that is where the differential (diff) lock is located. When you put a chain on each wheel it will drive the vehicle forward.

Some of the Western Star Trucks will have a diff lock for each axle with two switches on the dashboard of the cab, one for each axle. There will also be an inter-axle diff lock that will lock the axle across each set of tandem axles and will lock in between both sets so all four sets of tires on the back of the semi truck will rotate at the same rate. When the diff lock is on there will not be differential speeds.

It’s important that you do not leave the diff lock on while driving at highway speeds. If you do happen to forget and leave the diff lock on while driving you will possibly wear the tires out faster. One thing to keep in mind is that you should stop the truck or travel at a very slow speed in a straight line when you engage and disengage the diff lock. You do not want to lock the differential gears up while the truck is at speed or turning and the wheels are at different speeds or you are likely to cause damage to the gears.

Cline Wood represents top trucking insurance carriers across the country. We have access to all types of insurance programs. We treat your company as if it were our own. Contact us today to find out how we can help you manage your risk, which directly contributes to your bottom line.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Scopelitis June Legislative Trends Newsletter

Posted June 14, 2017 by Erin

Cline Wood works closely with Scopelitis, Garvin, Light, Hanson & Feary (The Scopelitis Law Firm), a leading Transportation industry law firm. They have been a valuable resource to many of our customers because of their understanding and involvement in the transportation industry.

The Scopelitis Law Firm recognizes that, in order to prepare for potential risks and strategic opportunities, businesses of all sizes must stay informed regarding regulatory and legislative change. This newsletter includes a sampling of noteworthy developments or trends affecting transportation in Congress or the state legislatures during the last two months.

Trends covered in the Scopelitis June Legislative Trends Newsletter include:

  • Scopelitis Law Alert: U.S. DOL Announces Withdrawal of Joint Employment, Independent Contractor Informal Guidance
  • States Seek Infrastructure Funding
  • Lowering Roadblocks to Platooning
  • States React to Gig Economy
  • FY 2018 Presidential Budget
  • DOT Personnel Changes
  • Regulatory Reform
  • Tax Reform
  • FMCSA Withdraws Minimum Insurance Limits Rulemaking
  • Entry-Level Driver Training Rule
  • FMCSA Split-Sleeper Berth Pilot
  • Rescission of USDOL Persuader Rule Submitted to OMB

Find the full version of the newsletter by clicking here. For any additional information on their Firm, please follow Scopelitis on social media, visit their Legislative Services Practice Area page, or contact the Scopelitis legislative team – Greg Feary, Shannon Cohen, or Prasad Sharma – to further explore how they may provide the most well-tailored service for you.


The Scopelitis Legislative Trends Newsletter is intended as a report to clients and friends on legislative developments affecting the transportation industry. The published material does not constitute an exhaustive legal study and should not be regarded or relied upon as individual legal advice or opinion.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

 

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Subscribe to Our Posts

Share Buttons

Share on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook
Copyright © 2017 Cline Wood.