Viewing posts from: May 2017

2017 International Roadcheck Event to Focus on Cargo Securement Inspections

Posted May 26, 2017 by Administrator

This year the International Roadcheck event sponsored by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) is being held June 6-8, 2017. The event is held across North America, including the United States, Canada and Mexico, where nearly 17 trucks or buses will be inspected, on average, every minute during a 72-hour period. Inspectors will primarily be conducting the Level 1 roadside inspection, which is the most thorough, to make sure the big rigs should be on the road.

The North American Standard Level I inspection is very detailed. Here is a highlight of what the CVSA inspectors really do. It is virtually impossible to tell, just by looking at a rig, if it is in compliance or not. Visually, a vehicle can look old and still be able to pass an inspection and, vice versa, a newer vehicle can look like it should be in tip-top shape but not be in compliance. It takes a highly-trained, certified inspector to complete the comprehensive inspection.

The Level I inspection entails the following checks:

  • driver credentials
  • valid commercial license
  • no outstanding warrants
  • up-to-date log books
  • driver hours are in compliance
  • medical card is current
  • major vehicle components (front, back, sides, rear and underneath)
  • check chassis, frame and braking components

The message the CVSA International Roadcheck is sending to trucking companies and drivers throughout the event is the same message for every day of the year: make safety your very highest priority. When transporting hazmat and securing cargo, remember that keeping your truck in compliance will help to ensure that you, and everyone that shares the road with you, will get home safely. Lives, and livelihoods, depend on it. For more information about trucking safety, compliance, and coverages, contact us.

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Insurance Solutions for High Livestock Mortality Rates

Posted May 18, 2017 by Administrator

Raising livestock and poultry is a risky business. That is why farmers need adequate insurance to cover their animals from unexpected events. Farmers have a variety of options available to them when it comes to farm animal insurance. They can opt for customized coverage for the specific types of animals they raise or combine several different policies.

Fundamentals of Livestock Insurance

Farmers can often combine their livestock coverage into their overall farm package. This way, they can have adequate protection for their buildings, livestock, and poultry in the event of a death due to accident or injury. Some policies cover animal deaths due to illness as well, but this is specialized coverage.

Farmers can use the following methods to insure their animals:

  • Herd Coverage: This is the most basic and common coverage. Farmers use this type of insurance to cover a precise number of animals.
  • Blanket Coverage: This type of policy insures all farm property. It includes buildings, livestock, equipment, and so on.
  • Individual Coverage: This policy covers animals with higher worth. The policy explicitly states which animals are covered. The corresponding animals often have an identifying feature such as an ear tag.

Farmers can also purchase insurance unique to their livestock. Some examples include:

  • Cattle insurance
  • Pig insurance
  • Poultry insurance

Farm insurance packages often cover animals such as sheep and goats, so farmers do not need specific policies for these animals.

Farmers invest a lot of time and money into their animals. For many farmers, their livestock is their livelihood so they cannot afford to neglect insurance. To learn more about insuring livestock, contact the experts at Cline Wood.

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Safe Parking for Commercial Trucks

Posted May 11, 2017 by Administrator

Truckers need and deserve safe parking. Shipping and receiving facilities are sometimes in very bad neighborhoods. When there isn’t a safe place to park, drivers may be mugged, beat up or have their equipment damaged. Between 2010 and 2014, 40 big-rig drivers were killed while working, according to the Bureau of Labor statistics. And homicides are only part of the problem. Truck cargo thefts occur at the rate of at least twice daily; 86% of those when commercial vehicles are parked in unsecured location such as public parking and truck trailer drop lots.

The issue of safe and adequate parking has been an issue for decades. The FMCSA has conducted studies on the issue. One study, “Commercial Driver Rest and Parking Requirements” was originally conducted in 1996 and was updated in 2014. The study found that there are 1700 miles of interstate highway that are not within 30 miles of a truck stop or rest area. Some drivers choose to ignore important Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association (FMCSA) hours-of-service rules so they can keep driving until a legal and safe parking spot is available. The shortage of parking suitable for commercial motor vehicles puts tired drivers in a bad position.

The FHWA has established the National Coalition on Truck Parking. So far, several major trucking organizations, such as the American Trucking Association and the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association have joined the coalition. The coalition is looking at concerns such as why $231M in parking projects across the U.S. have been submitted, but only $34M has been allocated. Most of the $34M ($20M) has been awarded to pay for intelligent transportation systems technology that alerts drivers when parking spaces are available through in-cab messaging notification systems. Some drivers advocate for cities to change zoning laws to permit additional commercial vehicle parking accessibility. Other advocates want shippers to take more responsibility and allow truckers to park in their lots when resting or waiting.

Clearly, the truck driver parking shortage remains a stubborn issue that just won’t go away. Trucker parking shortage is costing the trucking industry time, money and productivity, not to mention the risk for drivers in terms of stress, fatigue, security for their equipment and, most importantly, their personal safety.

To learn more about the issues that concern truck drivers today, trucking coverage and risk management, contact us.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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Pros and Cons of Electronic Log Books for Commercial Truck Drivers

Posted May 2, 2017 by Administrator

Many commercial truck drivers that have not started using electronic log books are skeptical, if not worried, about implementing an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR) system in their vehicle. Although most drivers will admit the system is not yet perfected, many have been pleasantly surprised. The general consensus is that there are more good points about e-logs than bad.

Positive aspects often cited by drivers include:

  • the system forces you to get the proper amount of rest. Getting enough rest is important not only from a regulations point of view, but for the health and safety of the trucker and the public.
  • despite having to adhere to the hours-of-service regulations, drivers do not feel they are losing money in the long run. This was a major concern of many drivers. Most drivers report that by having the proper rest and sleep they reduce stress, which actually leads to increased productivity.
  • e-logs prevent drivers from being pushed or pressured by dispatchers requiring unreasonable delivery schedules because the driver’s hours are documented in the log.
  • if a situation arises – such as inclement weather or sleepiness, the log book becomes the driver’s ally because it documents the condition that causes them to pull over, ensuring that they will operate your vehicle safely.
  • upper management of fleets like the e-logging system because records are accurate and legible. The logs can be reviewed at any time by the company’s safety team, which saves money and time.

The major complaint heard by drivers using the EOBR is that there’s no leeway when using an e-logging system. For example, if a driver gets stuck in traffic there’s absolutely nothing they can do to get off the road safely in the time the machine allots. Drivers feel there should be some latitude built into the system for uncontrollable circumstances.

There’s no doubt that the EOBR system is the future of the trucking industry. It appears that this is a good thing because our country’s drivers will be rested and less stressed, and the roads will be safer for both drivers and the general public who share the road with them.

To learn more about the issues that concern truck drivers today, trucking coverage and risk management, contact us.

This document is not intended to be taken as advice regarding any individual situation and should not be relied upon as such. Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC shall have no obligation to update this publication and shall have no liability to you or any other party arising out of this publication or any matter contained herein. Any statements concerning actuarial, tax, accounting or legal matters are based solely on our experience as consultants and are not to be relied upon as actuarial, accounting, tax or legal advice, for which you should consult your own professional advisors. Any modeling analytics or projections are subject to inherent uncertainty and the analysis could be materially affective if any underlying assumptions, conditions, information or factors are inaccurate or incomplete or should change.

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